News U.S. National Security Agency Issues Up on Crypto-Resistant Encryption

R_1

Glorious
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"The agency's interest in quantum computing is such, even, that as a part of the document trove leaked by Edward Snowden, it was revealed that the agency invested $79.7 million in a research program titled “Penetrating Hard Targets” - which aimed to explore whether a quantum computer " it ends there abruptly. end of paragraph 4. delete comment after correction thanks
 

GenericUser

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Nov 20, 2010
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Shouldn't the title be "...Quantum-Resistant Encryption" instead of Crypto-Resistant Encryption? Or am I missing something? Crypto resistant makes it sound like the encryption is resistant to itself or something.
 

Sippincider

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Apr 21, 2020
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What happens when something that's been quantum-encrypted with infinite combinations, gets attacked by a quantum-decrypter that runs all the combinations at once?

The Universe folds onto itself with a divide-by-zero error?
 

husker

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What happens when something that's been quantum-encrypted with infinite combinations, gets attacked by a quantum-decrypter that runs all the combinations at once?

The Universe folds onto itself with a divide-by-zero error?
Doing my best Neil Degrasse Tyson impersonation, I would say: Actually, some infinities are larger than other infinities. So the system (the encryption or the attacker) that uses the largest infinity will win out in the end. How can one infinity be larger than another, you ask? One common explanation is this: The list of whole numbers (1, 2, 3, ...) is infinite. But the number of real numbers between any 2 whole numbers is also infinite. So the list of all real numbers between all whole numbers contains an infinity of infinities, and therefore is larger than the first infinity.
 

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