[SOLVED] Ubee DDW36C, next door WiFi bogs down and disconnects.

GreenWitcher

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Sep 13, 2015
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So I have a Ubee DDW36C that I got from Time Warner roughly 4-5 years ago. The room next to me, across from a small hallway, is constantly having issues with the WiFi. The connection is apparently always either disconnected, or bogged down to the point of slow access. That room is currently using devices like an Apple TV and laptop (older 32-bit CPU). The same issue is also frequent with another Apple TV we have in the living room, which is just a wall and a bookshelf away from mine. Really not sure what to do at this point aside from purchasing a new modem and router with some kind of special WiFi technology that will really just penetrate those walls. It doesn't make sense to me considering this unit is capable of 80MHz Channel Bandwidth with a 5G Hz wireless network set. It also has 8 different Wireless Channels like 36/80 and 149/80. Is there a setting, if anyone knows the model, that I can set that will just make the WiFi more stable enough that these problems won't occur. Maybe I'm missing something in the firmware? If not, then what is the STRONGEST WiFi signal I can buy on the market? Pretty much at wit's end with this.
 
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You would have to look the numbers up in the FCC database to be sure but I strongly suspect that device puts out the legal maximum power. It is actually fairly rare to find anything other than say a portable battery powered router that does not use the legal maximum. The price of the microwave amplifier technology has gotten so cheap it doesn't save money to put in lower power chips.

It is much more likely it is the end device that does not put out full power since they are much more concerned with portability issues like size and battery power. With multiple devices that is less likely.

Your first thing to try is use the 2.4g band it tends to penetrate walls more easy. It might not be as fast but a stable but somewhat slower connection maybe acceptable. You should get enough speed to do normal stuff only large downloads will be affected.

You may also want to force the channel width to 40 or even 20 both on 5g and 2.4g. Using 80 increases your chance of interference from neighbors. There are only 2 blocks that can run that large and many people now have tri band routers or wifi6 routers that use both those blocks so one neighbor can be using all the radio bandwidth there is.

The wifi radios in the router may have failed. There is no way to really test this. If you do buy a new router you could use the old one as a modem and it would save you some money.
 
You would have to look the numbers up in the FCC database to be sure but I strongly suspect that device puts out the legal maximum power. It is actually fairly rare to find anything other than say a portable battery powered router that does not use the legal maximum. The price of the microwave amplifier technology has gotten so cheap it doesn't save money to put in lower power chips.

It is much more likely it is the end device that does not put out full power since they are much more concerned with portability issues like size and battery power. With multiple devices that is less likely.

Your first thing to try is use the 2.4g band it tends to penetrate walls more easy. It might not be as fast but a stable but somewhat slower connection maybe acceptable. You should get enough speed to do normal stuff only large downloads will be affected.

You may also want to force the channel width to 40 or even 20 both on 5g and 2.4g. Using 80 increases your chance of interference from neighbors. There are only 2 blocks that can run that large and many people now have tri band routers or wifi6 routers that use both those blocks so one neighbor can be using all the radio bandwidth there is.

The wifi radios in the router may have failed. There is no way to really test this. If you do buy a new router you could use the old one as a modem and it would save you some money.
 

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