News Ubisoft’s In-game NFTS Have Made Just $400

Endymio

Notable
Aug 3, 2020
554
164
1,070
2
It might be too early to dismiss the Ubisoft Quartz / Digits /NFT experiment. ...
This may well qualify as the understatement of the year, given these NFTs have only been available for a few days, and apparently only available in just one of Ubi's games, and that a version in beta. I understand their plan is to extend these across much of the Ubi line of games.
 

korekan

Prominent
Jan 15, 2021
65
2
535
0
can we bring the NFT to other platform?
if not isn't its already there with "lootboxes" thing?
 

Endymio

Notable
Aug 3, 2020
554
164
1,070
2
NFT's could have a cool factor to them, but the big companies only want to figure out the best way to monetize them ...
Ah, but that's the beauty of the free market. The best way to monetize anything is to provide a product that satisfies customers, at a price they're willing to pay.
 

bigdragon

Distinguished
Oct 19, 2011
870
235
19,360
0
I don't understand how Ubisoft's NFT implementation is fundamentally different from Steam's market for in-game items -- something that's been around for a decade or longer. Publishers and developers can already monetize their games and create markets without supporting GPU-hoarding, market-distorting, environment-damaging, crypto stuff. Even Blizzard's ill-fated, real money auction house accomplished the same item monetization without supporting crypto.
 

Endymio

Notable
Aug 3, 2020
554
164
1,070
2
I don't understand how Ubisoft's NFT implementation is fundamentally different from Steam's market for in-game items...Publishers and developers can already monetize their games and create markets without supporting GPU-hoarding, market-distorting, environment-damaging, crypto stuff.
A whole host of misconceptions here. Besides the misrepresentations about mining-based crypto, Ubisoft is running on the Tezos blockchain, which is proof-of-stake based, and thus doesn't require mining. Still further, the point of an NFT is to allow transactions to occur without the approval and existence of a central authority, such as that required by Steam's implementation.
 

DataMeister

Honorable
May 7, 2016
28
3
10,535
0
Seems like the classic example of a company wanting to create something valuable by artificial scarcity and the customer deciding they aren't interested.
 
Reactions: SSGBryan

ASK THE COMMUNITY