Question Undervolting on A520 with a 5600X

Jun 29, 2021
11
0
10
0
Hey!
I have a question. Is it possible to undervolt with this chipset?
Do I HAVE to use PBO to undervolt because its not available on A520.
Is there any other way to do it and what would the options be called ?
Thanks for the help in advance.
 
Hey!
I have a question. Is it possible to undervolt with this chipset?
Do I HAVE to use PBO to undervolt because its not available on A520.
Is there any other way to do it and what would the options be called ?
Thanks for the help in advance.
Look for VCore voltage setting in your BIOS. People with A320 have said they don't have it so it's unlikely yours will.

The performance uplift doing it provides is, if anything, very small. You're way better off just putting a really decent cooler on it and making sure the case is well ventilated too, especially if it's an air cooler.
 
Jun 29, 2021
11
0
10
0
Look for VCore voltage setting in your BIOS. People with A320 have said they don't have it so it's unlikely yours will.

The performance uplift doing it provides is, if anything, very small. You're way better off just putting a really decent cooler on it and making sure the case is well ventilated too, especially if it's an air cooler.
Well I have a 212 EVO on the 5600X inside a FSP CMT211A with 3 intake fans and 1 out.
And on idle the CPU does like 55-60c. Weirder than i'd like.
 
Cinebench R23 after running both tests CPU maxes out at around 75c
That's a great temp and nothing to worry about.

Ryzen's, especially 3rd and 4th gen, are known for oddly high temps at 'idle'. That's because of two reasons: they have dozens of temp sensors scattered around the CPU dies and they boost an individual core aggressively for even the slightest process. The temp readout is the highest temp at the moment so there's bound to be a short spike in temp somewhere on the CPU. It's highly localized, though, and not really significant until it's in a all-core heavy workload.

It's kinda like reading the temp of every oven in New York city. At any given moment someone's heating a pizza so you'll always see a high temp; but it's not enough to worry about overheating the power lines until every oven is heating pizza at the same time.
 
Last edited:

Howardohyea

Proper
May 13, 2021
219
53
170
2
Look for VCore voltage setting in your BIOS. People with A320 have said they don't have it so it's unlikely yours will.

The performance uplift doing it provides is, if anything, very small. You're way better off just putting a really decent cooler on it and making sure the case is well ventilated too, especially if it's an air cooler.
the A series board doesn't offer any OC capabilities so I doubt VCore is available on any board.

Also I don't know why people say undervolt will get more performance, the only thing I can think of is preventing it thermal throttling. And using PBO is technically overclock, not undervolt
 
....
Also I don't know why people say undervolt will get more performance, the only thing I can think of is preventing it thermal throttling. And using PBO is technically overclock, not undervolt
With 5000 series PBO can provide a performance improvement when you use something called the curve optimizer. By undervolting slightly when you do that it can keep the CPU cooler and not pull back on boost clocks.

The actual performance improvements seen with PBO isn't very even though. It's generally only seeing it holding rated clocks 'longer', subjectively speaking, with minor improvements in benchmarks. Also, it won't pull back as far as base clock on extreme heavy load. But it's hard to say it's really not as much due to use of really good cooling since one effect of PBO is to raise heat output a lot so you need improved cooling. Ryzen's boost algorithm is so temperature sensitive that if you keep it cool it's as effective as "overclocking" all on it's own.

Thermal throttling occurs when the CPU exceeds safe thermal limits (95C for 5600X) and it pulls clock back hard (something like 800Mhz I think) to allow the CPU to cool off. That's way, way worse than simply limiting boost.

People call PBO overclocking but it really doesn't do that at all; it let's the CPU draw more power and current than specified limits which lets it boost to it's rated clocks longer. The limits (TDP, EDC and TDC) are established as much, if not more, to protect motherboard VRM's. The processor's boost algorithm is left intact and keeping the processor within defined, safe, limits of temperature, clocks and voltage (called FIT). The only time that changes is by increasing something called the PBO Scalar setting.
 
Last edited:

ASK THE COMMUNITY