Question Unknown reason my NVMe won’t boot after Windows Install

Jul 4, 2022
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For reference:
-Motherboard is Aorus B550M Pro-P
-USB Flash is a 32GB SanDisk USB3.0
-Bios version is f15c
-NVMe drive is a WD Black SN750 1TB plugged into my motherboards M2A slot, and it’s the only drive in my PC at the moment.
-Processor is a Ryzen 7 5800x
-Windows 10, sourced from Microsoft on the Windows Media Tool

I’ve been stuck trying to figure out why I can’t properly boot up Windows after I successfully install it off of my USB drive. I’ve disabled TPM 2.0, CSM Support and Secure Boot, and I even updated my BIOS.
Along with that, I’ve also:
-Went into my Elevated Command Script and used ‘bootrec /scanos’ to confirm my windows was installed.
-Rebuilt the BCD both from the file source AND the bootrec command
-Created multiple partitions, both Primary and EFI
-Used bcdboot to make boot files UEFI

All of this to no avail. Please help!
 
Last edited:
Jul 4, 2022
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My apologies, I should have specified.
My processor is a Ryzen 7 5800x and I’m trying to install Windows 10 sourced from Microsoft Media Tool.
 

dwd999

Honorable
In addition is there a video card installed? Also after you updated the bios, did you set all of its settings to Default and was Secure Boot enabled? Going back to the beginning, is this a new drive, does it have a GPT identifier was it blank other than the GPT identifier? And after the installer completed the first phase of installation, did you pull the usb and what happened then? Did the motherboard not reboot at that time?
 
Jul 4, 2022
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In addition is there a video card installed? Also after you updated the bios, did you set all of its settings to Default and was Secure Boot enabled? Going back to the beginning, is this a new drive, does it have a GPT identifier was it blank other than the GPT identifier? And after the installer completed the first phase of installation, did you pull the usb and what happened then? Did the motherboard not reboot at that time?
Yes I have a 3070 installed. After the update I loaded my BIOS to optimized settings and Secure Boot is active as well as CSM being disabled. Yes it’s a new drive with a GPT identifier ( in ‘diskpart’ the drive shows as GPT) and upon pulling the USB out after the install it took me to my motherboards BIOS and doesn’t show my NVMe drive.
 

dwd999

Honorable
Yes I have a 3070 installed. After the update I loaded my BIOS to optimized settings and Secure Boot is active as well as CSM being disabled. Yes it’s a new drive with a GPT identifier ( in ‘diskpart’ the drive shows as GPT) and upon pulling the USB out after the install it took me to my motherboards BIOS and doesn’t show my NVMe drive.
Perhaps you could wait until later to load your bios optimized settings and just use the default settings for the install process.
 
Jul 4, 2022
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Perhaps you could wait until later to load your bios optimized settings and just use the default settings for the install process.
I tried this option, again to no avail. I have recently realized that I had a storage space for the SSD and I’m guessing that’s why it was able to find my drive on Windows Installer, and upon deleting that storage space it’s no longer recognized on said installer, but my system BIOS can recognize it. Any tips?
 

dwd999

Honorable
I tried this option, again to no avail. I have recently realized that I had a storage space for the SSD and I’m guessing that’s why it was able to find my drive on Windows Installer, and upon deleting that storage space it’s no longer recognized on said installer, but my system BIOS can recognize it. Any tips?
The installer can be kind of quirky; I find it works easiest and fastest for me when I prepare my drive in advance. I use the Gparted app to make sure my drive has a GPT identifier and that all of the drive's space is unallocated so that I don't have to worry about deleting any leftover partitions during installation. The last resort possibility is that the m.2 is just defective and should be returned. Or it could be a motherboard problem which you would have to diagnose using other ssds if you have any.
 
Jul 4, 2022
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The installer can be kind of quirky; I find it works easiest and fastest for me when I prepare my drive in advance. I use the Gparted app to make sure my drive has a GPT identifier and that all of the drive's space is unallocated so that I don't have to worry about deleting any leftover partitions during installation. The last resort possibility is that the m.2 is just defective and should be returned. Or it could be a motherboard problem which you would have to diagnose using other ssds if you have any.
At this point would it be easier to upgrade to windows 11 and get the download media for that?
 
I’ve been stuck trying to figure out why I can’t properly boot up Windows after I successfully install it off of my USB drive. I’ve disabled TPM 2.0, CSM Support and Secure Boot, and I even updated my BIOS.
If you installed windows in legacy mode, then you can not turn off CSM.

Please boot from windows installation media into command prompt (press Shift+F10),
execute following commands and show a screenshot with command output
(upload to imgur.com and post link)
diskpart
list disk
select disk 0
list volume
 

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