Build Advice Upgrade from i7-5th gen to i7-13th gen ?

naguib nader

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i m thinking of upgrading my current i7-5th rig to 13th as its nearly 9 years now
i m trying to figure out whether its worth it or not to do so

my current rig
Intel Core i7-5820
Asus x99-a
2*8 ddr4
RTX2080
Seasonic 850w Bronze

i m only aiming at upgrading MB-CPU-RAM
ASUS PRIME Z790 P WIFI DDR5
INTEL CORE I7 13700KF
CORSAIR VENGEANCE 32GB (2X16GB) DDR5 4800MHZ

will my old PSU be enough for the new build or i will have to change it as well
thnx in advance any advice will be much appreciated
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
What is the actual model of your 850w Seasonic and is it 9 years old too?

Whether it's "worth it" depends a lot on what you do and don't do.

What resolution are you gaming at with that 2080? How many displays? What types of games and what level of quality settings?

What country are you in and what is your budget for the upgrades?
 

naguib nader

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What is the actual model of your 850w Seasonic and is it 9 years old too?
yes i bought it with my rig

Whether it's "worth it" depends a lot on what you do and don't do.
Mostly gaming

What resolution are you gaming at with that 2080? How many displays? What types of games and what level of quality settings?
2k 120 MHz , just one single monitor , all kind of games nothing specific

What country are you in and what is your budget for the upgrades?
Egypt around 30k
 

Why_Me

Champion
i m thinking of upgrading my current i7-5th rig to 13th as its nearly 9 years now
i m trying to figure out whether its worth it or not to do so

my current rig
Intel Core i7-5820
Asus x99-a
2*8 ddr4
RTX2080
Seasonic 850w Bronze

i m only aiming at upgrading MB-CPU-RAM
ASUS PRIME Z790 P WIFI DDR5
INTEL CORE I7 13700KF
CORSAIR VENGEANCE 32GB (2X16GB) DDR5 4800MHZ

will my old PSU be enough for the new build or i will have to change it as well
thnx in advance any advice will be much appreciated
You can save some money if you wait until January 3rd when Intel is due to release the i5 13400 / 13400F and the i7 13700 / 13700F along with the less expensive B760 boards.
 

naguib nader

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You can save some money if you wait until January 3rd when Intel is due to release the i5 13400 / 13400F and the i7 13700 / 13700F along with the less expensive B760 boards.
due to current circumstances waiting is risky to avoid any drop may happened in currency change rate then i will have to pay double or maybe triple my current budget
 
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Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
So, if your PSU is 9 years old, and especially since you're investing in all new hardware, my recommendation would be that you also need to replace the power supply as well. Assuming it was one of Seasonic's good models, and I have no idea if it is or not since you still haven't said what model it is (Again, it is ON the specifications label on one or another of the sides of the power supply), it would still be a very good idea to replace it even if you weren't changing any hardware at all.

9 years ago Seasonic, and basically nobody, had any power supply models with a 10 year warranty yet. The majority of very high end models had maybe a 5 year warranty with just a very small handful perhaps having as much as a 7 year warranty. Any time you are beyond the warranty period and are investing in all new core hardware or new platform, it's very unwise to trust that hardware to a power supply that has already exceeded or is very close to the end of the safe and useful lifespan the manufacturer felt it could be trusted as reliable for. If the manufacturer doesn't want to trust that a unit will last past five years, I am certainly not going to do so with any of my highly valued hardware. Perhaps as a temporary backup or for a low priority/low cost system but not for my expensive gaming machine with hundreds or thousands of dollars worth of hardware in it.

It simply isn't worth it to save 70-125 bucks.
 
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naguib nader

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So, if your PSU is 9 years old, and especially since you're investing in all new hardware, my recommendation would be that you also need to replace the power supply as well. Assuming it was one of Seasonic's good models, and I have no idea if it is or not since you still haven't said what model it is (Again, it is ON the specifications label on one or another of the sides of the power supply), it would still be a very good idea to replace it even if you weren't changing any hardware at all.

9 years ago Seasonic, and basically nobody, had any power supply models with a 10 year warranty yet. The majority of very high end models had maybe a 5 year warranty with just a very small handful perhaps having as much as a 7 year warranty. Any time you are beyond the warranty period and are investing in all new core hardware or new platform, it's very unwise to trust that hardware to a power supply that has already exceeded or is very close to the end of the safe and useful lifespan the manufacturer felt it could be trusted as reliable for. If the manufacturer doesn't want to trust that a unit will last past five years, I am certainly not going to do so with any of my highly valued hardware. Perhaps as a temporary backup or for a low priority/low cost system but not for my expensive gaming machine with hundreds or thousands of dollars worth of hardware in it.

It simply isn't worth it to save 70-125 bucks.
my psu model is seasonic m12ii 850 bronze
i m only aiming in upgrading CPU-MB-RAM bundle that's why i will keep parts of my old rig
u mean my current 9 years old psu will not handle my new rig in case of upgrading so if i need to upgrade i need to change my psu as well if i get your point right correct me if i get you wrong
& there is no chance of my old psu will handle the new rig with 2080
i m planning to change it but the pirority is for CPU-MB-RAM bundle then next step will be GPU with PSU
 
850 watts should be fine unless you were to get a more power hungry video card. I don't know if power supplies wear out as they get older.

Do you still have all the cables that came with the power supply. Not sure if the motherboard will run or not with only 1 8 pin cpu power connector. A 13700k on a "Z" motherboard can pull a lot of power in the default.
If your old board uses 2 cpu power cables then it is not a issue.
It was somewhat surprising that a power supply that old had 4 total cpu/gpu power connectors.
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
I don't know if power supplies wear out as they get older.
Yes, they ABSOLUTELY wear out as they get older. Even those using ALL high quality Japanese capacitors, will still wear out. A unit using cheap caps might be good for 2-5 years of fairly rigorous usage while one with a very high quality internal component selection and excellent build quality with a good layout and sufficient cooling might last anywhere from 5-10 years depending on when it was made and who made it.
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
my psu model is seasonic m12ii 850 bronze
i m only aiming in upgrading CPU-MB-RAM bundle that's why i will keep parts of my old rig
u mean my current 9 years old psu will not handle my new rig in case of upgrading so if i need to upgrade i need to change my psu as well if i get your point right correct me if i get you wrong
& there is no chance of my old psu will handle the new rig with 2080
i m planning to change it but the pirority is for CPU-MB-RAM bundle then next step will be GPU with PSU
No, I'm not saying it "can't handle it". I'm saying, you shouldn't even risk it.

What is the point of spending almost a thousand dollars on new hardware just to have a power supply that's been in use for at least 9 years and might well have questionable performance, increased ripple, almost certainly not the kind of good voltage regulation it once had and potentially protections that might be prone to not working anymore simply due to age. While I'm not saying any one of those is actually a problem with YOUR unit, I AM saying that nobody familiar with power supplies would think it's a good idea to use ANY 9 year old power supply with 1000 dollars worth of brand new high end hardware.

Risking that kind of investment over another 100-125 dollar investment is just plain foolish.
 

Eximo

Titan
Ambassador
Running temperature of the PSU is a major factor in aging. Below is the rule of thumb for capacitors.

Actual useful lifespan = [Lifespan at 105 °C] ∙2x where X is (Lifespan temperature - actual operating temperature)/ 10
(Something like 5000 hours would be a typical high end capacitor at 105C)

So say 55C which would be a pretty normal temperature for a PSU, you would be looking at 50,000 hours. And you assume roughly 10,000 hours per year. That is still only 5 years, but that would be 24/7 at a pretty high load, full time. If you only use the system under load, say 8 hours a day, you can triple that. (but you do introduce heat cycles, which is a whole other topic)

More efficient power supplies will operate at lower temperatures, and underloaded PSUs will run even cooler.

Bronze isn't bad, but pretty far from the likes of Gold, Platinum, and Titanium (These cut waste heat by almost a factor of 2). Bronze rating would not have the highest end possible capacitors and other components either.

As an aside, you should also consider replacing all the fans in a 9 year old system.

Safer to buy a new PSU than not. That warranty comes with some liability if the PSU fries your components as well.
 
What graphics card are you planning on getting for that upgrade down the road? Is that going to be soon enough that we can guess the wattage of a PSU you will need? For a new PSU I would get something from or manufactured by Seasonic, Corsair, EVGA, or Superflower. Most likely you will need at minimum a 650w PSU for current parts and up to an 850w unit for a future graphics card.
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
At minimum. I'd prefer to see something like a 750w unit, a good one, with that build. That CPU can potentially pull over 230w at full load or over 300w when overclocked. And for future cards, don't even guess because some of them like the 4090 can pull over 400w for itself and that IS NOT factoring in any transient spikes. Even the RTX 4080 can pull around 230w by itself. If one of these cards is potentially in your future you'd want to see more like a very, very good 850-1200w unit.

But regardless, none of that is even relevant to the question at hand, which is, whether the current PSU is a safe bet for continued use with the new hardware and while it MIGHT be ok, it's rolling the dice. You MIGHT be ok driving your car down the highway at 65mph with a temporary spare doughnut on it too, but I sure as hell wouldn't want to be in it while you do it.
 
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At minimum. I'd prefer to see something like a 750w unit, a good one, with that build. That CPU can potentially pull over 230w at full load or over 300w when overclocked. And for future cards, don't even guess because some of them like the 4090 can pull over 400w for itself and that IS NOT factoring in any transient spikes. Even the RTX 4080 can pull around 230w by itself. If one of these cards is potentially in your future you'd want to see more like a very, very good 850-1200w unit.

But regardless, none of that is even relevant to the question at hand, which is, whether the current PSU is a safe bet for continued use with the new hardware and while it MIGHT be ok, it's rolling the dice. You MIGHT be ok driving your car down the highway at 65mph with a temporary spare doughnut on it too, but I sure as hell wouldn't want to be in it while you do it.
In my opinion he needs a new PSU. This was the basis of trying to find a potential future GPU to give him a PSU recommendation. That PSU was just "Okay" for its time. 9 years later its going to have issues with higher power components either right away or within a year I would bet. We really need some websites for Egypt to find a recommendation for a PSU as well, at least I do.
 

naguib nader

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No, I'm not saying it "can't handle it". I'm saying, you shouldn't even risk it.

What is the point of spending almost a thousand dollars on new hardware just to have a power supply that's been in use for at least 9 years and might well have questionable performance, increased ripple, almost certainly not the kind of good voltage regulation it once had and potentially protections that might be prone to not working anymore simply due to age. While I'm not saying any one of those is actually a problem with YOUR unit, I AM saying that nobody familiar with power supplies would think it's a good idea to use ANY 9 year old power supply with 1000 dollars worth of brand new high end hardware.

Risking that kind of investment over another 100-125 dollar investment is just plain foolish.
i managed to bring the box & take a few images for it as u were asking for the model hopefully those pics will help
https://ibb.co/vxN95zm
https://ibb.co/kMcBLmj
https://ibb.co/3zgvB5s
https://ibb.co/s2FhmsX
 

naguib nader

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Running temperature of the PSU is a major factor in aging. Below is the rule of thumb for capacitors.

Actual useful lifespan = [Lifespan at 105 °C] ∙2x where X is (Lifespan temperature - actual operating temperature)/ 10
(Something like 5000 hours would be a typical high end capacitor at 105C)

So say 55C which would be a pretty normal temperature for a PSU, you would be looking at 50,000 hours. And you assume roughly 10,000 hours per year. That is still only 5 years, but that would be 24/7 at a pretty high load, full time. If you only use the system under load, say 8 hours a day, you can triple that. (but you do introduce heat cycles, which is a whole other topic)

More efficient power supplies will operate at lower temperatures, and underloaded PSUs will run even cooler.

Bronze isn't bad, but pretty far from the likes of Gold, Platinum, and Titanium (These cut waste heat by almost a factor of 2). Bronze rating would not have the highest end possible capacitors and other components either.

As an aside, you should also consider replacing all the fans in a 9 year old system.

Safer to buy a new PSU than not. That warranty comes with some liability if the PSU fries your components as well.
i didn't know but i m never faced any issue along 9 years till this moment
the reason as i m not upgrading my rig at one of course i m limited to budget taking into consideration current circumstances , inflation & currency may drop at any moment
so its my first step to upgrade MB-CPU-RAM
then second step will be GPU-PSU and any other necessary parts
 

naguib nader

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What graphics card are you planning on getting for that upgrade down the road? Is that going to be soon enough that we can guess the wattage of a PSU you will need? For a new PSU I would get something from or manufactured by Seasonic, Corsair, EVGA, or Superflower. Most likely you will need at minimum a 650w PSU for current parts and up to an 850w unit for a future graphics card.
thats my second upgrade when it took place it will PSU with at least 1000 watt or even more watt with GPU
but not gonna happened soon till i have the budget to do so i m not decieded yet which GPU i ll go for it
 

naguib nader

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At minimum. I'd prefer to see something like a 750w unit, a good one, with that build. That CPU can potentially pull over 230w at full load or over 300w when overclocked. And for future cards, don't even guess because some of them like the 4090 can pull over 400w for itself and that IS NOT factoring in any transient spikes. Even the RTX 4080 can pull around 230w by itself. If one of these cards is potentially in your future you'd want to see more like a very, very good 850-1200w unit.

But regardless, none of that is even relevant to the question at hand, which is, whether the current PSU is a safe bet for continued use with the new hardware and while it MIGHT be ok, it's rolling the dice. You MIGHT be ok driving your car down the highway at 65mph with a temporary spare doughnut on it too, but I sure as hell wouldn't want to be in it while you do it.
if i take a step down with CPU & go for i5-13600KF which is less power demanding than the i7 13700KF it's still be rolling dice situation or at least will be more safer
& give me more space in terms of time till upgrade the PSU
 

naguib nader

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850 watts should be fine unless you were to get a more power hungry video card. I don't know if power supplies wear out as they get older.

Do you still have all the cables that came with the power supply. Not sure if the motherboard will run or not with only 1 8 pin cpu power connector. A 13700k on a "Z" motherboard can pull a lot of power in the default.
If your old board uses 2 cpu power cables then it is not a issue.
It was somewhat surprising that a power supply that old had 4 total cpu/gpu power connectors.
i have all the cables came with the PSU
if i take a step down regarding the CPU and go for i5-13700KF which is less power demanding than the i7-13700KF then its will be more safer i think
 
i have all the cables came with the PSU
if i take a step down regarding the CPU and go for i5-13700KF which is less power demanding than the i7-13700KF then its will be more safer i think
I assume you mean i5-13600.

What you can also do is go into the bios and cap the power the 13700 chip is allowed to use. From the benchmarks I have seen you can set the power limit lower and still get very good clock rates on these chips. Not sure I myself just started to really look at this after getting sucked into building a new pc for a friend.
It seems for things like gaming you can get very high single core clock rates and not excessive power consumption.

For a pc upgrade for myself I am waiting till january to see where the new 3xd chips from amd are cost/performance wise.
 

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