Question Upgrade Help!!!

Oct 14, 2019
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Can you help me on the order of what to upgrade first on my current PC, where I can still able to use it whilst upgrading.
This will be a long time phase upgrading. My target final usage is maxed 1440p high refresh rate gaming while also can play 4K in high settings and minimal video photo editing.

Here's my current setup:
CPU: Ryzen 3 1200
CPU Cooling: Stock Ryzen Fan
Motherboard: Asus ROG Strix B350F
GPU: Palit Single Fan 1050ti
RAM: Trident Z RGB 8GB 2400hz
HDD: 2x500GB, 1x2TB
SDD: N/A
PSU: Seasonic M12II 520w Bronze
Monitor: 720p Monitor
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
First upgrade, new CPU. You current CPU is likely a bottleneck even for that 1050 ti. I'd recommend the R5 3600 or 3600x. Should be fine with your current motherboard. You could go with a higher CPU but it's probably not going to net you a heck of a lot more in terms of FPS over the 3600x.

Second upgrade, ditch that slow 2400mhz memory and get a 2 x8GB 3200-3600mhz kit. Even your current 1st gen Ryzen would be doing better with faster memory. This could be swapped with the first upgrade, however you probably won't have much success running at higher than 2933mhz with that CPU, which is why I suggest upgrading the RAM after you upgrade the CPU.

Third upgrade, before getting a higher end graphics card, would be a better PSU. The M12II units were very good once upon a time but they are hard to recommend for use with modern high end systems as they are simply outdated platforms and they lack some of the more important protections such as OTP, plus the capacity is not sufficient for any high end cards anyhow. Model recommendations here:



Capacity recommendations based on card model, here:

http://www.realhardtechx.com/index_archivos/Page362.htm

Then, graphics card should be revisited once the other upgrades are complete. Options and pricing will change too much between now and then, depending on how long "long time phase" turns out to be.
 
Oct 14, 2019
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First upgrade, new CPU. You current CPU is likely a bottleneck even for that 1050 ti. I'd recommend the R5 3600 or 3600x. Should be fine with your current motherboard. You could go with a higher CPU but it's probably not going to net you a heck of a lot more in terms of FPS over the 3600x.

Second upgrade, ditch that slow 2400mhz memory and get a 2 x8GB 3200-3600mhz kit. Even your current 1st gen Ryzen would be doing better with faster memory. This could be swapped with the first upgrade, however you probably won't have much success running at higher than 2933mhz with that CPU, which is why I suggest upgrading the RAM after you upgrade the CPU.

Third upgrade, before getting a higher end graphics card, would be a better PSU. The M12II units were very good once upon a time but they are hard to recommend for use with modern high end systems as they are simply outdated platforms and they lack some of the more important protections such as OTP, plus the capacity is not sufficient for any high end cards anyhow. Model recommendations here:



Capacity recommendations based on card model, here:

http://www.realhardtechx.com/index_archivos/Page362.htm

Then, graphics card should be revisited once the other upgrades are complete. Options and pricing will change too much between now and then, depending on how long "long time phase" turns out to be.
Can I go 3700x 1st with my current mobo? I don't care if it doesn't improve fps that much for now. My target partner as of now base on reading and watching articles, reviews, is 3700x + 2080 super.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
I don't see why not. The 3700x is actually 40w LESS TDP than the 2700x, which I've seen used without issue on that board, and is actually almost identical to the Ryzen 7 1700 in terms of being 65w with 8 cores and 16 threads, and that CPU was widely used, even overclock, on that same B350-F. I don't see an issue really so long as you have an appropriate BIOS version installed that supports it AND I would recommend that you invest in better cooling. I would not recommend using any of the Wraith coolers with that configuration and on that board. Even if it was a Crosshair, I'd still recommend a better cooler AND that you pay some attention to the case cooling as well. Keeping those VRM/mosfets cool and keeping the CPU cooler and GPU card supplied with plenty of fresh ambient air should be a priority.
 
Oct 14, 2019
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I don't see why not. The 3700x is actually 40w LESS TDP than the 2700x, which I've seen used without issue on that board, and is actually almost identical to the Ryzen 7 1700 in terms of being 65w with 8 cores and 16 threads, and that CPU was widely used, even overclock, on that same B350-F. I don't see an issue really so long as you have an appropriate BIOS version installed that supports it AND I would recommend that you invest in better cooling. I would not recommend using any of the Wraith coolers with that configuration and on that board. Even if it was a Crosshair, I'd still recommend a better cooler AND that you pay some attention to the case cooling as well. Keeping those VRM/mosfets cool and keeping the CPU cooler and GPU card supplied with plenty of fresh ambient air should be a priority.
I'm just worrying if there's any compatibility issues with my current mobo. I always update my bios every few months. For the memory is there a huge difference on 3200 vs 3600, here it has around $40 difference. And for the psu if I get 850 should it be gold if i'm gonna pair it with 2080 super, or 850 bronze is enough? Thanks for your informative answers.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
For the difference in performance on Ryzen, the extra 40 bucks for the 3600mhz sticks might actually be worth it. Even 3200mhz sticks would give you good enough performance though so go with what you can afford based on whether or not it means you'll have to skimp someplace else in the build. Honestly, I'd rather see a really high quality PSU and only 3200mhz memory than I would a cheaper PSU with faster sticks. The PSU is more important, especially with a high end graphics card.

Gold, means nothing in terms of quality or performance. Please read the recommendations I linked to earlier. I make very clear recommendations and clarifications in that guide.

If you get a 2080 Super, then a GOOD 750w or a VERY GOOD 650w would be an appropriate capacity. You don't need an 850w unit for that configuration unless you are planning to seriously overclock the graphics card and add a LOT of extra stuff including 7 or more fans, MANY internal and external storage devices, lots of RGB, and probably some kind of CPU overclocking, which is pretty much fruitless on Zen2 anyhow.

I think 750w, if the model is a good one, should be the maximum you'd ever need and likely 650w is the perfect capacity if you don't plan to overclock anything. Those numbers change if you go with a mediocre or crappy power supply though.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Yeah, that's all pretty standard fare. No issues there at all. I'd go with a very good 650w unit (Seasonic Prime, EVGA G2/P2, Corsair RMx/RMi) or a good 750w unit like the Seasonic Focus Plus, Corsair TXm, RM (non-x or i), EVGA GQ, Antec High current gamer Pro or True power classic. All of which are outlined in the guide Iinked before.
 
Oct 14, 2019
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Thank You again, I re-read the capacity per gpu model you linked. I thought I read that 2080 Super needs 800w I was mistaken it for the 2080 SLI that needs higher wattage.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
I don't see any reason to upgrade the motherboard unless something goes wrong with yours that forces you to replace it OR if there is some feature on a newer board that you want or need, and don't have on your current board.
 

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