Build Advice Upgrading after 12 years, Please help me choose the right parts for my new PC

Teekiii

Reputable
Jan 19, 2017
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Hi Everyone,
Please know that the help you're going to offer means a LOT to me ! really, I appreciate the time and effort you gonna put in this topic :)
I will try to make this topic as clear as possible,
I'm a graphic designer / mechanical engineer and I'm using my current PC since 2009! it's really old but it did it's job through out the past decade
(it was a high end pc back then and it was my architect sister's PC). I never had the chance or the money to buy my own P.C.

Anyway now I do, so now you can imagine how important this is to me, I love to do my research when I'm about to buy anything so I spent the last 3 days watching and reading a ton of infos so that I can choose wisely within my "Budget Limits", I had a good I idea about the market and the technology nowadays.
-----------

My main target:
I need a PC that would last as long as possible with me as I'm not likely to upgrade for the next (5-6) years, so a future proof component is a must.

Main use:
1- Graphic Design:
. - Adobe Products ofc Photoshop / Illustrator / After Effects / InDesign / XD etc.
. - Cinema 4d / SolidWorks / AutoCAD.
. - KeyShot

. Also most important thing that I'm intending to expand my experience in 3D field so I will use Corona and Unreal Engine also.

2- Gaming ( as I won't be able to buy the PS5 any sooner) : I Play games like Battlefield / Need for speed / PES / FIFA / RD2 / God of War.

----------
I've divided the components into the normal list.
each section contains the options and the price in Egyptian pound (I live there) and its equivalent in US dollar.
P.s: I shop from this website its has good prices and clean interface with good search filters, so feel free to browse with me (https://www.elnekhelytechnology.com/)


CPU:
AMD RYZEN 9 3900XT 12-Core 24-Threads------------------------- 8,800 EGP / 559.82 $
AMD RYZEN 9 5900X 12-Core 24-Threads------------------------- 10,200 EGP / 648.89 $ [Update: Chosen]

Question 1: I'm confused between them the only reason I want the 5900X it because its 4th gen which I understand to be better and more future proof, right? but it's quite expensive so is it worth it?


GPU:
Gigabyte GeForce RTX 2060 OC 6G-----------------------------10,200 EGP / 648.89 $ [Update: Chosen]

The GPUs in Egypt are unbelievably expensive, I already made up my mind on this one as its the most budget friendly , the other option will be Super edition with 8G but I can't seem to find it new here, yet

Question 2: Will this card run the games mentioned earlier in a good manner ALSO and help me with my type of work 3D-2D graphic Design? or should I Get the 2060 super 8Gb at any cost? known that is available but in used condition 5-6 month for 12,000 EGP / 763.85$ should get one or is it risky?



Motherboard:
ASUS X570-P PRIME ARGB ATX----------------------------- 3,300 EGP / 209.93 $ [Update: Chosen]
GIGABYTE X570 UD AM4 AMD ----------------------------- 3,150 EGP / 200.39 $

OMG it took my hours to decide which motherboard is good for my built, there are plethora of boards out there, anyway I want a future proof board with a price that doesn't exceed 3000 EGP but I only found that options in B550 which doesn't support the 4th gen of ryzen so I narrowed down to these two.

Question 3: Which one is better? am I right about that decision, preferring the X570 to B550?


RAM:
Corsair VENGEANCE LPX 16GB 3200MHz Cl16 DDR4 Memory -----------------------------1,600 EGP / 101.79 $ [Update: Chosen]
Kingston HyperX Predator DDR4 16GB 3200MHz Cl16 Gaming Memory------------------- 1,600 EGP / 101.79 $

I will grab a pair of them to get 32Gb in total, I just went with the Crosair because I read it has a better cooling due to its body material, any way

Update: Why corsair? its 30 mm Heigh the Kingston is over 40 mm, so corsair is shorter leaving more room for the NH-D15 Cooler, Plus it has aluminum cover that means better cooling, though they may never get high temperature

Question 4: Same price, same specs which is better?


Case:
Gigabyte C200 GLASS RGB Mid Tower Case------------------------- 800 EGP / 50.89 $ [Update: replaced with mesh case for better AF]
Lian Li - Lancool II Mesh RGB ---------------------------------------------1,800 EGP / 116.8 $ [Update: Chosen]


Question 5: its a Mid Tower case would that be a problem in the general cooling of the built? Should I get case fans?



Storage:
Samsung 970 Evo Plus 250GB NVMe M.2 PCIe Gen 3.0 x 4, NVMe 1.3-----------------------------1,200 EGP / 76.39 $ [Update: Chosen]
[or]
Samsung 970 Evo Plus 500GB NVMe M.2 PCIe Gen 3.0 x 4, NVMe 1.3-----------------------------1,900 EGP / 120.94 $
[and]
Seagate Barracuda 2TB 7200 RPM SATA HDD ----------------------------------------------------------1,100 EGP / 70 $

When it comes to storage its a mess, I really don't know what comb will work best for me, what I know is that I will need a 2 TB space (1 Tb for graphic resources and software + 1 Tb for personal data, games, etc)
I choose the HDD for the 2tb storage because I don't want to live with the fear of the SSD lifetime and its sudden death, I think HDD will live longer as long as its protected as my current WD lived for almost 12yrs,
Question 6: is that right thinking? of should I get a SSD for storage instead?

The reason for the additional PCIe NVMe is for the OS, a 250 will be just fine for me for an OS, so why the 500 option? that's because of the gaming issue, where should I install my games will decide which of these two spaces (250 or 500 Gb) should I get, I read that installing a game on the NMVe SSD should work better but it will shorten the lifetime of the SSD due to heating and write/read times, so
Question 7: What should I do about this mess ?


Other Components

PSU:
EVGA BR 500W 80 Plus Bronze Power Supply------------------------- 850 EGP / 54 $ [Update: Low quality, replaced with 80+ 650Watt]
Cooler Master MWE 650W 80 PLUS Gold V2 Full Modular---------2000 EGP / 130 $ [Update: Chosen]

I used online calculators to estimate the wattage I'm going to need, and I guess 80+ bronze is fine, right?
Question 8: is this one good or not ?


Coolers:
[AIO]
Deepcool GAMMAXX L120 V2 RGB CPU Liquid Coolers----------950 EGP / 60.44 $
[or Air]
Cooler Master Hyper 212 LED Turbo Cpu Cooler-------------------750 EGP / 47.71 $
Deepcool GAMMAXX 400 PRO Cpu Cooler------------------------- 650 EGP / 41.35 $

I watched a lot of videos to decide but still can't
Question 9: Which one is better? will this single fanned AIO be as good as the Hyper 212?

Updated: chosen the NH-D15 though its exoensive but it turned out its a must due to the ryzen 5900x TDP

Noctua NH D15 Chromax.Black--------------------2,200 EGP / 143 $ [Update:Chosen]

Monitor:

I have no clue at all! honestly I can't decide which one is good for me,don't laugh at this but I have this LG 21 inch flatron w2234s and this monitor has a very correct color! as a graphic designer this is crucial to me
even a little bit of tone shift or a low contrast can blow the whole thing for me, I've seen a lot of monitors and this monitor is very accurate though its very old.
so basically I need a very accurate monitor with a very good contrast and a detailed menue so I can change the profiles and customize them. Also size matters, I need it to be big
so that I don't suffer with menus and timeline in AE or 3D programs also for multitasking, so we're talking curved 32 inch because 27 inch wouldn't be so great right?

the budget is limited by 6,000 EGP / 381 $, and the market options can be found on these shops:
https://www.elnekhelytechnology.com/monitors
https://elbadrgroupeg.store/index.php?route=product/category&path=66
https://www.amazon.eg/-/en/gp/browse.html?node=26082314031&ref_=nav_em_pc_desktops_0_2_4_4

Also I found this one but honestly the red color will be much of distraction for me while designing
https://www.elnekhelytechnology.com/monitors/msi-32-inch-optix-ag32cv?mfp=20f-monitor-screen-size[28-inch,32-inch]&sort=p.price&order=ASC

Question 10: What do you recommend?


This will be everything, Please answer the questions you know the best in a corresponding numbers to my question,
Also Please keep in mind that this is a huge deal for me as I work a full time freelancer so I'll spend most of my day on this PC, and I really appreciate all the time and the effort you're putting in this,
Thank you. :)
 
Last edited:

Eximo

Titan
Ambassador
  1. How much CPU you buy is really up to you. Generally the 5800X is considered too expensive compared to the 5600X, only two cores more. 12 cores on the other hand is much better for multitasking.
  2. RTX 2060 is an alright card, certainly capable of gaming at 1080p in every game on the market.
  3. Boards are more or less interchangeable. ASUS offers a little more power input, but doesn't look like the VRMs are much better than the Gigabyte. If it has all the features you want, no problem with either.
  4. Ryzen 5000 series should be able to support 3600 memory speeds easily enough, that would be my recommendation there. 3200 is fine though, ignore the marketing about cooling, DDR4 doesn't really need cooling at all, heatspreaders are mostly for appearance. (DDR5 should be another story, as they moved power regulation to the sticks)
  5. Chassis has a fairly restricted front, so isn't amazing for airflow, but should be alright with the component selection. I would not consider overclocking or much larger GPUs in that chassis. (perhaps a reverse flow setup using the top and rear as intakes and the front as exhaust, maybe)
  6. Hard drives are still cheaper for bulk storage, but hard to beat a 1TB SATA SSD for a nice combo of speed/cost. Hard drives and SSDs can both fail at any time, the key is to have a proper backup solution. Another disk that you can keep separate from the system that is backed up regularly, or some type of cloud storage.
  7. Get a large M.2 NVMe drive for the OS, your applications, and games. Add additional SATA storage as you go when you run out of NVMe slots.
  8. That is not a very good PSU. You should be looking at 550-650W gold rated power supplies for quality and longevity. EVGA Supernova comes to mind if that brand is available to you. Corsair RM or RMx series, Seasonic, Superflower Leadex.
  9. Those are all budget coolers, not really suitable for a 5800X or 5900X, you should consider something from be quiet! like the Dark Rock series, Noctua NH12, DH15, or a 240mm all in one cooler. 120mm are barely better than the other coolers you listed for a lot more money.
  10. IPS panels with a good Adobe sRGB rating or other color accuracy rating are good for the type of work you are doing. Size is good for the work, but also high resolution. I would say 1440p as a minimum at 27" and 4K for 32"
 

logainofhades

Titan
Moderator
For cad work, yes I would say the 5900x is worth it.

I agree that a 2060 is a fine 1080p card.

B550 supports 4th gen Ryzen. This would be my pick, as I have one in my secondary rig. https://www.elnekhelytechnology.com/motherboards/gigabyte-b550-aorus-elite-v2?mfp=1f-brand,gigabyte/2f-cpu-socket,amd-am4/3f-motherboard-chipset,amd-b550&sort=p.price&order=ASC

Ram, I would just get a 2x16gb kit, from the start. DDR4 3600 CL16 is the sweet spot for 3rd and 4th gen ryzen. Looking at prices, this is the best one I see. https://www.elnekhelytechnology.com/ram/g-skill-trident-z-royal-gold-rgb-16gb-2×16-ddr4-3600-cl16-1-35v-1?mfp=5f-ram-size[32gb-(2x16)],6f-ram-speed[3600mhz]&sort=p.price&order=ASC

That case is going to be restrictive, for airflow, and would need fans added. You could go with this one, and avoid buying extra fans. https://www.elnekhelytechnology.com/cases/deepcool-matrexx-50-mesh-4fs?sort=p.price&order=ASC

That is not a quality PSU. Something like this would be far better. https://www.elnekhelytechnology.com/psu/corsair-tx650m-650-watt-80-plus-gold-certified-psu?mfp=15f-psu-watt[600w---799w,800w---999w],16f-psu-certificate[80-plus-gold,80-plus-platinum]&sort=p.price&order=ASC

I agree on cooler, for a 5900x, you are going to want a bigger/better cooler.

I agree with above, on monitor too.
 

Aeacus

Glorious
Ambassador
CPU:
AMD RYZEN 9 3900XT 12-Core 24-Threads------------------------- 8,800 EGP / 559.82 $
AMD RYZEN 9 5900X 12-Core 24-Threads------------------------- 10,200 EGP / 648.89 $
Both of these CPUs are great for your design/3D work due to the many cores and threads they have.

However, since you plan to use your new PC as long as possible, you are going to move from Windows 10 to Windows 11 at some point (maybe not now but probably 4 years into the future, when Win10 support ends). With this, at least at current moment, there is an issue.

Here's latest news, from JayzTwoCents, regarding Win11 and AMD CPUs:

View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mg5xJtmCZbI


Having ~30% performance drop with AMD CPUs, when going from Win10 to Win11 is huge issue.
It may be solved due time (before Win10 support ends) or it may not. But it's something to keep in mind.

GPU:
Gigabyte GeForce RTX 2060 OC 6G-----------------------------10,200 EGP / 648.89 $
For gaming, it's fine.

I'm more worried about the 3D rendering part, since when you use GPU render, that needs more VRAM and CUDA cores. The more - the better. Real world difference is the time it takes to render 3D graphics, where less powerful GPU = longer rendering time.

Motherboard:
ASUS X570-P PRIME ARGB ATX----------------------------- 3,300 EGP / 209.93 $
GIGABYTE X570 UD AM4 AMD ----------------------------- 3,150 EGP / 200.39 $
Here is good article about best AMD MoBos at current date,
link: https://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/best-motherboards,3984-2.html

X570 vs B550 comes down to features what MoBo offers. For your workstation rig, X570 chipset would be preferred for additional features and build quality that goes into it. Especially since you plan to use your PC as long as possible.

RAM:
Corsair VENGEANCE LPX 16GB 3200MHz Cl16 DDR4 Memory -----------------------------1,600 EGP / 101.79 $
Kingston HyperX Predator DDR4 16GB 3200MHz Cl16 Gaming Memory------------------- 1,600 EGP / 101.79 $
It comes down to the RAM timings.
Also, Kingston RAM is taller in height, so, if you're planning to use CPU cooler that overhangs RAM slots, Corsair RAM offers better compatibility.

Case:
Gigabyte C200 GLASS RGB Mid Tower Case------------------------- 800 EGP / 50.89 $
Since choosing a PC case is personal choice, i have no comments about your choice.

Though, if you don't like the RGB strip it has, you can turn off the RGB or even don't connect it to the power source, so, it won't lit up.

As far as cooling goes, it comes with 1x 120mm fan, mounted as rear exhaust. That isn't enough and you'd need to buy more fans for your PC cooling.
PC case supports 2x 120/140 fans on top and 3x 120mm or 2x 140mm fans on front.

I checked your store and case fan selection is bad. It is really bad, where only 3 brand fans are offered, only in 120mm size. And where all the fans have RGB on them, where performance wise, all are poor fans. Many of them aren't in stock either.

So, the best from the worst, and what is in stock, would be Cougar Vortex RGB HPB or SPB. The only difference between the two, is that HPB has 18 LEDs while SPB has 24 LEDs per fan.
Corsair iCUE SP120 RGB PRO has the best performance of all offered fans but sadly, it isn't in stock.

You can buy two sets of 3x 120mm fans, Cougar HPB or SPB and when removing PC case stock fan, you can install all the fans in your PC case. I don't think you need to connect RGB to make the fans work. But if you have to, you can turn the RGB off.

Storage:
Samsung 970 Evo Plus 250GB NVMe M.2 PCIe Gen 3.0 x 4, NVMe 1.3-----------------------------1,200 EGP / 76.39 $
[or]
Samsung 970 Evo Plus 500GB NVMe M.2 PCIe Gen 3.0 x 4, NVMe 1.3-----------------------------1,900 EGP / 120.94 $
[and]
Seagate Barracuda 2TB 7200 RPM SATA HDD ----------------------------------------------------------1,100 EGP / 70 $
Choice of picking 970 Evo Plus is a good one, since it's the best consumer M.2 NVMe SSD with balanced price to performance ratio.

250 GB is enough for OS and few games. 500 GB is better when you plan to hold some of your projects on there as well.
Since you're unsure of the storage arrangement, how about this:
*OS - 970 Evo Plus, 250 GB
  • Work/games - 860 Evo, 2 TB
  • Backup - HDD, WD Blue, 2 TB, 5400 RPM
I know that this 3 drive setup costs a lot more than your initial idea but since your aim is longevity, while having 2 TB drive for work/games, having this setup would give you very fast OS load times (thanks to 970 Evo Plus), fast work projects and games load times (860 Evo), while you have a backup drive as well, where to store the crucial info/ past projects. 5400 RPM drive, while having slower read/write times, than 7200 RPM drive, also consumes less power and has longer lifespan. And latter is the main point of your build.

Here's some further reading about 7200 RPM vs 5400 RPM,
link: https://pureinfotech.com/difference-5400-7200-rpm-hard-drives/

PSU:
EVGA BR 500W 80 Plus Bronze Power Supply------------------------- 850 EGP / 54 $
Now, this needs to be changed for sure.

RTX 2060 is 160W GPU, R9 5700X is 105W CPU, adding the rest of the build to it at ~150W = ~400W. But that doesn't include peak powers your CPU and GPU can get. Here, and with your build, minimum PSU wattage i'd be comfortable using, would be 650W unit. Since that offers the comfortable buffer of at least 200W.

With PSU wattage cleared, now comes the most important part: PSU build quality.
PSU is the most important component in the PC since it powers everything. And when cheap and low quality PSU blows up, it has the magical ability to fry everything it is connected to.
Solely for that risk alone (loosing your entire PC since you cheaped out on PSU), are you willing to take this risk? I'm not.

Checked your store and selection of PSUs is also poor. However, there are good PSUs there.
Cheapest PSU, i'd be comfortable using, would be EVGA 650 G2,
link: https://www.elnekhelytechnology.com/psu/evga-650w-80-plus-gold-fully-modular-power-supply-1

Coolers:
[AIO]
Deepcool GAMMAXX L120 V2 RGB CPU Liquid Coolers----------950 EGP / 60.44 $
[or Air]
Cooler Master Hyper 212 LED Turbo Cpu Cooler-------------------750 EGP / 47.71 $
Deepcool GAMMAXX 400 PRO Cpu Cooler------------------------- 650 EGP / 41.35 $
As far as AIOs vs air coolers go, you won't gain any cooling performance if you go with AIO over air cooler since both are cooled by ambient air.
For equal cooling performance between AIOs and air coolers, rad needs to be 240mm or 280mm. Smaller rads: 120mm and 140mm are almost always outperformed by mid-sized air coolers. Single slot rads are good in mini-ITX builds where you don't have enough CPU cooler clearance to install mid-sized CPU air cooler.

Here are the positive sides of both (air and AIO) CPU cooling methods;

Pros of air coolers:
less cost
less maintenance
less noise
far longer longevity
no leakage risks
doesn't take up case fan slots
additional cooling for the RAM
CPU cools down faster after heavy heat output

Pros of AIOs:
no RAM clearance issues*
no CPU clearance issues
CPU takes longer time to heat up during heavy heat output (about 30 mins)
* on some cases, top mounted rad can give RAM clearance issues

While how the CPU cooler looks inside the PC depends on a person. Some people prefer to see small AIO pump in the middle of their MoBo with tubing going to the rad while others prefer to see big heatsink with fans in the middle of their MoBo.

Main difference between AIO and air cooler is that with AIO, you'll get more noise at a higher cost while cooling performance remains the same.
Here's also one good article for you to read where king of air coolers (Noctua NH-D15) was put against 5x high-end AIOs, including king of AIOs (NZXT x61 Kraken),
link: http://www.relaxedtech.com/reviews/noctua/nh-d15-versus-closed-loop-liquid-coolers/1

Personally, i'd go with air coolers every day of the week. With same cooling performance, the pros of air coolers outweigh the pros of AIOs considerably. While, for me, the 3 main pros would be:
1. Less noise.
Since i like my PC to be quiet, i can't stand the loud noise AIO makes. Also, when air gets trapped inside the AIO (some AIOs are more prone to this than others), there's additional noise coming from inside the pump.
2. Longevity.
Cheaper AIOs usually last 2-3 years and high-end ones 4-5 years before you need to replace it. While with air coolers, their life expectancy is basically unlimited. Only thing that can go bad on an air cooler is the fan on it. If the fan dies, your CPU still has cooling in form of a big heatsink. Also, new 120mm or 140mm fan doesn't cost much and it's easy to replace one. While with AIOs, the main thing that usually goes bad is the pump itself. And when that happens, your CPU has no cooling whatsoever. Since you can't replace pump on an AIO, you need to buy whole new AIO to replace the old one out.
3. No leakage risks.
Since there's liquid circling inside the AIO, there is always a risk that your AIO can leak. While it's rare, it has happened. It's well known fact that liquids and electronics don't mix.


Because you plan to get 12 core and high power draw CPU, it also will produce a lot of heat. For such CPU, and when it comes to air cooling, only big boys are sufficient enough. Deepcool Gammax 400 Pro is mid-sized CPU cooler and good for mid-range CPUs. But for your high-end CPU, it is not enough. What is enough, is Noctua NH-D15 chromax.black,
link: https://www.elnekhelytechnology.com/fans-coolers/noctua-nh-d15-chromax-black

I checked the clearances and it fits barely, where CPU cooler height is 165mm with fans installed and your Gigabyte case also has up to 165mm of CPU cooler clearance.

Monitor:

I have no clue at all! honestly I can't decide which one is good for me,don't laugh at this but I have this LG 21 inch flatron w2234s and this monitor has a very correct color! as a graphic designer this is crucial to me
even a little bit of tone shift or a low contrast can blow the whole thing for me, I've seen a lot of monitors and this monitor is very accurate though its very old.
so basically I need a very accurate monitor with a very good contrast and a detailed menue so I can change the profiles and customize them. Also size matters, I need it to be big
so that I don't suffer with menus and timeline in AE or 3D programs also for multitasking, so we're talking curved 32 inch because 27 inch wouldn't be so great right?
Size wise, and since you've used 21" thus far, even 24" is upgrade. But 27" is better. Oh, if you are sitting behind desk, ~1m from monitor, 32" would give you ability to see individual pixels. So, it's up to you and how much money you have.


To pick a monitor, it's good when you know more about different monitor panel types. There are 3x kinds of monitor panels: TN, VA and IPS. Actually there are more (variations of the main three) but i focus on these main ones.

TN panel is oldest of the three and also cheapest. Where TN panel excels is it's performance, most notably response time (1ms).
Though, TN panel also has it's downsides. Prominent ones are: poor color accuracy (washed out colors), very narrow view angle and poor contrast ratio (max 1000:1).

Gaming wise, TN panel monitor is best suited for fast-paced games (FPS, racing etc), where you don't care as much about pretty colors as you do about smoothness of movements.

IPS panel has been around for some time and is also the most expensive of the three.
Where IPS panel excels is it's color accuracy, which is the best of the three. Also, it has widest viewing angles of the three.
But where IPS panel falls short is response time. IPS technology by design can't be any faster than 4ms (compared to the 1ms most TN panels are). Another area where IPS panel falls short is it's poor contrast ratio which is equal to a TN panel (max 1000:1), despite it's great color accuracy. This is most prominent when looking at black image and where black isn't black but instead gray or some form of blue. Refresh rates aren't IPS panel strong side either and many IPS panels are 60Hz, especially on higher resolutions. There are some 1440p 165Hz and 4K 120Hz IPS panel monitors out there but they are few and far apart, also costing a fortune.

Gaming wise, IPS panel monitor is best suited for slow-paced games (RPG, strategy etc), where you have time to see all those pretty colors and where smoothness of movements isn't that important.

VA panel is the newest of the three and price wise, it falls between TN and IPS. VA panel was created to take the best of both worlds (TN and IPS) and combine them.
Where VA panel excels is it's contrast ratio (min 3000:1), where you'd see the deepest and richest blacks. Also, it doesn't fall short on other aspects as well. VA panel color accuracy isn't as good as it is for IPS panel but it's close to the levels of IPS panel (considerably better than TN panel). It's viewing angle is also a notch smaller than that of an IPS panel but again, considerably better than that of a TN panel. Refresh rate wise, VA panel is more capable on different resolutions than IPS panel. Response time is another area where VA panel does good. While VA panel can't naturally be any faster than 4ms (just like IPS panel), it can achieve the magical 1ms response thanks to the software solution in it.
With VA panel monitors making waves lately, there aren't any major downsides of them. Availability used to be issue but not anymore.

Gaming wise, VA panel monitor is suited for all kinds of games. VA panel is like Jack of all trades but master of none.


So, if you want best contrast go with VA panel.

E.g: MSI 27 inch Optix G27C4 165hz 1ms Curved,
link: https://www.elnekhelytechnology.com/monitors/msi-27-inch-optix-g27c4
 

Teekiii

Reputable
Jan 19, 2017
51
4
4,535
0
For cad work, yes I would say the 5900x is worth it.

I agree that a 2060 is a fine 1080p card.

B550 supports 4th gen Ryzen. This would be my pick, as I have one in my secondary rig. https://www.elnekhelytechnology.com/motherboards/gigabyte-b550-aorus-elite-v2?mfp=1f-brand,gigabyte/2f-cpu-socket,amd-am4/3f-motherboard-chipset,amd-b550&sort=p.price&order=ASC

Ram, I would just get a 2x16gb kit, from the start. DDR4 3600 CL16 is the sweet spot for 3rd and 4th gen ryzen. Looking at prices, this is the best one I see. https://www.elnekhelytechnology.com/ram/g-skill-trident-z-royal-gold-rgb-16gb-2×16-ddr4-3600-cl16-1-35v-1?mfp=5f-ram-size[32gb-(2x16)],6f-ram-speed[3600mhz]&sort=p.price&order=ASC

That case is going to be restrictive, for airflow, and would need fans added. You could go with this one, and avoid buying extra fans. https://www.elnekhelytechnology.com/cases/deepcool-matrexx-50-mesh-4fs?sort=p.price&order=ASC

That is not a quality PSU. Something like this would be far better. https://www.elnekhelytechnology.com/psu/corsair-tx650m-650-watt-80-plus-gold-certified-psu?mfp=15f-psu-watt[600w---799w,800w---999w],16f-psu-certificate[80-plus-gold,80-plus-platinum]&sort=p.price&order=ASC

I agree on cooler, for a 5900x, you are going to want a bigger/better cooler.

I agree with above, on monitor too.
First of all, I really appreciate the time and effort you've to reply, really much appreciated.
So considering your precious feedback & also a nice guy from reddit's feed back I've decided to make these updates

CASE:
LIAN LI - Lancool-II-Mesh-rgb its 1000 EGP / 65$ more expensive but its airflow worth it !

PSU:
Cooler Master MWE 650W 80 PLUS Gold V2 Full Modular Power Supply BTW its the same as the one you've picked the Corsair TX650M, Which one is better?

Cooler:
I would go with this one for now Cooler Master Hyper 212 unless you recommend sth better but budget friendly

For the ram I really think I'm going to need that 32Gb for video editing and other graphic stuff, I may upgrade to 64 gigs in the future so I'm going to need the other 2 slots, so I think its okay to get the 2x16gb with 3200 CL16, Right?

Now for the Motherboard, though I've spent a lot of time reading on this issue (B550 Vs X570) It seems, after your comment, that I can't make the right decision, So I want a direct answer, take in consideration that I Will get the 59000X
which is better, and has more/better/futur proof options GIGABYTE B550 AORUS ELITE V2 OR ASUS X570-P PRIME ARGB ATX assume that they have the same price.

And I'll take you advice, with the CPU, I will get the 5900X
and Also for the GPU thanks for letting me know that the 2060 is a good one, I really had some doubts and I was afraid that it may not run the upcoming games, especially Battlefield 2042, properly, But I guess it will run them in a decent way, Right?

For the monitor part, I didn't really get what you meant.

after all that effort, THANK YOU !
 

Teekiii

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  1. How much CPU you buy is really up to you. Generally the 5800X is considered too expensive compared to the 5600X, only two cores more. 12 cores on the other hand is much better for multitasking.
  2. RTX 2060 is an alright card, certainly capable of gaming at 1080p in every game on the market.
  3. Boards are more or less interchangeable. ASUS offers a little more power input, but doesn't look like the VRMs are much better than the Gigabyte. If it has all the features you want, no problem with either.
  4. Ryzen 5000 series should be able to support 3600 memory speeds easily enough, that would be my recommendation there. 3200 is fine though, ignore the marketing about cooling, DDR4 doesn't really need cooling at all, heatspreaders are mostly for appearance. (DDR5 should be another story, as they moved power regulation to the sticks)
  5. Chassis has a fairly restricted front, so isn't amazing for airflow, but should be alright with the component selection. I would not consider overclocking or much larger GPUs in that chassis. (perhaps a reverse flow setup using the top and rear as intakes and the front as exhaust, maybe)
  6. Hard drives are still cheaper for bulk storage, but hard to beat a 1TB SATA SSD for a nice combo of speed/cost. Hard drives and SSDs can both fail at any time, the key is to have a proper backup solution. Another disk that you can keep separate from the system that is backed up regularly, or some type of cloud storage.
  7. Get a large M.2 NVMe drive for the OS, your applications, and games. Add additional SATA storage as you go when you run out of NVMe slots.
  8. That is not a very good PSU. You should be looking at 550-650W gold rated power supplies for quality and longevity. EVGA Supernova comes to mind if that brand is available to you. Corsair RM or RMx series, Seasonic, Superflower Leadex.
  9. Those are all budget coolers, not really suitable for a 5800X or 5900X, you should consider something from be quiet! like the Dark Rock series, Noctua NH12, DH15, or a 240mm all in one cooler. 120mm are barely better than the other coolers you listed for a lot more money.
  10. IPS panels with a good Adobe sRGB rating or other color accuracy rating are good for the type of work you are doing. Size is good for the work, but also high resolution. I would say 1440p as a minimum at 27" and 4K for 32"
Wow, What a rich answer !
thank you for your time and effort and your clean answer,

For the points,1,2,3, It's clear now that I will go with the best options 5900X,2060,Asus

for point 4, I have to get 2x16 gb and I can only find 3200 CL16 so as long as you said its fine, I'm okay with that, maybe I'll upgrade in the future.

5, noticed and changed to Lian Li II Mesh

6,7 I will get the NVMe for OS, Progs, Games (thanks for clarifying that I should put games on the same SSD of OS)

8, noticed and changed to 650W 80+ Gold Full mod Cool Master or corsair fire they are the same price but I may go with corsair as you second this after Logainofhades

9, the problem with Noctua is its expensive! but if I have to I will but one, I'd really apprecaite it if you helped me choose a proper cooler over here, or from websites above, if better than noctua within a budget limit of [1500 EGP]

10, a 4k 32" is way of my budget ! its very very expensive here in Egypt, I can afford 1080 in 32", would that be okay ?

thanks in advance
 

Eximo

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Hyper 212 is okay, might be a little noisier than other similarly priced coolers. With that selection I would probably still take the Noctua NH-U12S Redux for 1000 over the 212. They perform similarly, but the cheap LED fans on the 212 aren't very good.

2x16GB 3600 would be ideal. But from that site, CL16 3600 is about 40% more. 3200 isn't terrible.

RTX2060 is mid-range, not a great graphics card. All about what you can afford here.

Not much future proofing to be had at the moment. AMD and Intel are near end of life for DDR4 based systems. If the board has the features you think you need now, it is good enough. There will be no further AM4 boards to switch to. Features that will be available with the AM5 socket will require you to upgrade the processor anyway.


Monitors is a whole topic. The very basics:

TN: Fast response times, poor color accuracy, poor viewing angles (1ms or less in some cases)
IPS: Best viewing angles, best color accuracy, slowest potential response times (there are expensive IPS displays that can do 1-2ms)
VA: A mix between TN and IPS. Response times are good, color accuracy is okay, viewing angles are fairly good (however, many VA panels are curved to increase accuracy, not good for sharing)

1920x1080, 2560x1440, 3820x2160 (4K)

Pixel density, larger the screen at a fixed resolution the lower the pixel density. Maximum recommended size for 1080p is 24", for 1440p 27", any larger and 4K is recommended to maintain image sharpness. Higher resolution means that at 100% scaling you can fit more things on the screen, which is helpful for workloads.

There are color accuracy standards: Adobe RGB, sRGB, and DCI-P3 being the common ones marketed. This is how closely a monitor can represent colors of actual things. Very important when making content that the color you see on the screen is the color that someone else will see on a similarly good monitor, or printed, etc. If you use a cheap TN panel, and assume that is accurate, it will look completely different on someone else's screen.
 

Eximo

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6,7 I will get the NVMe for OS, Progs, Games (thanks for clarifying that I should put games on the same SSD of OS)

Response: Just pointing out there isn't much benefit to getting a small SSD for the OS and a few programs, with costs as they are getting larger SSDs make more sense. You can always add additional drives if you like the concept of splitting up tasks. The important thing for such a system is to have backups, I still recommend an external hard drive that you regularly use to clone the system, or a least backup important files.

9, the problem with Noctua is its expensive! but if I have to I will but one, I'd really apprecaite it if you helped me choose a proper cooler over here, or from websites above, if better than noctua within a budget limit of [1500 EGP]

Response: with that budget I would stick with the Redux. The standard one performs a little better, but not worth the price difference.

10, a 4k 32" is way of my budget ! its very very expensive here in Egypt, I can afford 1080 in 32", would that be okay ?

Response: No, I think you would regret a 32" 1080p screen. Even a 27" is pushing the pixel density. I had one for years and it was not an enjoyable reading experience, you could see the pixels. 1440p 32" would be more acceptable, but run into similar issues.

Maybe look at some of the 27" 1440p, the only reasonable priced 28" 4K is out of stock on that website.
 

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Both of these CPUs are great for your design/3D work due to the many cores and threads they have.

However, since you plan to use your new PC as long as possible, you are going to move from Windows 10 to Windows 11 at some point (maybe not now but probably 4 years into the future, when Win10 support ends). With this, at least at current moment, there is an issue.

Here's latest news, from JayzTwoCents, regarding Win11 and AMD CPUs:

View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mg5xJtmCZbI


Having ~30% performance drop with AMD CPUs, when going from Win10 to Win11 is huge issue.
It may be solved due time (before Win10 support ends) or it may not. But it's something to keep in mind.



For gaming, it's fine.

I'm more worried about the 3D rendering part, since when you use GPU render, that needs more VRAM and CUDA cores. The more - the better. Real world difference is the time it takes to render 3D graphics, where less powerful GPU = longer rendering time.



Here is good article about best AMD MoBos at current date,
link: https://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/best-motherboards,3984-2.html

X570 vs B550 comes down to features what MoBo offers. For your workstation rig, X570 chipset would be preferred for additional features and build quality that goes into it. Especially since you plan to use your PC as long as possible.



It comes down to the RAM timings.
Also, Kingston RAM is taller in height, so, if you're planning to use CPU cooler that overhangs RAM slots, Corsair RAM offers better compatibility.



Since choosing a PC case is personal choice, i have no comments about your choice.

Though, if you don't like the RGB strip it has, you can turn off the RGB or even don't connect it to the power source, so, it won't lit up.

As far as cooling goes, it comes with 1x 120mm fan, mounted as rear exhaust. That isn't enough and you'd need to buy more fans for your PC cooling.
PC case supports 2x 120/140 fans on top and 3x 120mm or 2x 140mm fans on front.

I checked your store and case fan selection is bad. It is really bad, where only 3 brand fans are offered, only in 120mm size. And where all the fans have RGB on them, where performance wise, all are poor fans. Many of them aren't in stock either.

So, the best from the worst, and what is in stock, would be Cougar Vortex RGB HPB or SPB. The only difference between the two, is that HPB has 18 LEDs while SPB has 24 LEDs per fan.
Corsair iCUE SP120 RGB PRO has the best performance of all offered fans but sadly, it isn't in stock.

You can buy two sets of 3x 120mm fans, Cougar HPB or SPB and when removing PC case stock fan, you can install all the fans in your PC case. I don't think you need to connect RGB to make the fans work. But if you have to, you can turn the RGB off.



Choice of picking 970 Evo Plus is a good one, since it's the best consumer M.2 NVMe SSD with balanced price to performance ratio.

250 GB is enough for OS and few games. 500 GB is better when you plan to hold some of your projects on there as well.
Since you're unsure of the storage arrangement, how about this:
*OS - 970 Evo Plus, 250 GB
  • Work/games - 860 Evo, 2 TB
  • Backup - HDD, WD Blue, 2 TB, 5400 RPM
I know that this 3 drive setup costs a lot more than your initial idea but since your aim is longevity, while having 2 TB drive for work/games, having this setup would give you very fast OS load times (thanks to 970 Evo Plus), fast work projects and games load times (860 Evo), while you have a backup drive as well, where to store the crucial info/ past projects. 5400 RPM drive, while having slower read/write times, than 7200 RPM drive, also consumes less power and has longer lifespan. And latter is the main point of your build.

Here's some further reading about 7200 RPM vs 5400 RPM,
link: https://pureinfotech.com/difference-5400-7200-rpm-hard-drives/



Now, this needs to be changed for sure.

RTX 2060 is 160W GPU, R9 5700X is 105W CPU, adding the rest of the build to it at ~150W = ~400W. But that doesn't include peak powers your CPU and GPU can get. Here, and with your build, minimum PSU wattage i'd be comfortable using, would be 650W unit. Since that offers the comfortable buffer of at least 200W.

With PSU wattage cleared, now comes the most important part: PSU build quality.
PSU is the most important component in the PC since it powers everything. And when cheap and low quality PSU blows up, it has the magical ability to fry everything it is connected to.
Solely for that risk alone (loosing your entire PC since you cheaped out on PSU), are you willing to take this risk? I'm not.

Checked your store and selection of PSUs is also poor. However, there are good PSUs there.
Cheapest PSU, i'd be comfortable using, would be EVGA 650 G2,
link: https://www.elnekhelytechnology.com/psu/evga-650w-80-plus-gold-fully-modular-power-supply-1



As far as AIOs vs air coolers go, you won't gain any cooling performance if you go with AIO over air cooler since both are cooled by ambient air.
For equal cooling performance between AIOs and air coolers, rad needs to be 240mm or 280mm. Smaller rads: 120mm and 140mm are almost always outperformed by mid-sized air coolers. Single slot rads are good in mini-ITX builds where you don't have enough CPU cooler clearance to install mid-sized CPU air cooler.

Here are the positive sides of both (air and AIO) CPU cooling methods;

Pros of air coolers:
less cost
less maintenance
less noise
far longer longevity
no leakage risks
doesn't take up case fan slots
additional cooling for the RAM
CPU cools down faster after heavy heat output

Pros of AIOs:
no RAM clearance issues*
no CPU clearance issues
CPU takes longer time to heat up during heavy heat output (about 30 mins)
* on some cases, top mounted rad can give RAM clearance issues

While how the CPU cooler looks inside the PC depends on a person. Some people prefer to see small AIO pump in the middle of their MoBo with tubing going to the rad while others prefer to see big heatsink with fans in the middle of their MoBo.

Main difference between AIO and air cooler is that with AIO, you'll get more noise at a higher cost while cooling performance remains the same.
Here's also one good article for you to read where king of air coolers (Noctua NH-D15) was put against 5x high-end AIOs, including king of AIOs (NZXT x61 Kraken),
link: http://www.relaxedtech.com/reviews/noctua/nh-d15-versus-closed-loop-liquid-coolers/1

Personally, i'd go with air coolers every day of the week. With same cooling performance, the pros of air coolers outweigh the pros of AIOs considerably. While, for me, the 3 main pros would be:
1. Less noise.
Since i like my PC to be quiet, i can't stand the loud noise AIO makes. Also, when air gets trapped inside the AIO (some AIOs are more prone to this than others), there's additional noise coming from inside the pump.
2. Longevity.
Cheaper AIOs usually last 2-3 years and high-end ones 4-5 years before you need to replace it. While with air coolers, their life expectancy is basically unlimited. Only thing that can go bad on an air cooler is the fan on it. If the fan dies, your CPU still has cooling in form of a big heatsink. Also, new 120mm or 140mm fan doesn't cost much and it's easy to replace one. While with AIOs, the main thing that usually goes bad is the pump itself. And when that happens, your CPU has no cooling whatsoever. Since you can't replace pump on an AIO, you need to buy whole new AIO to replace the old one out.
3. No leakage risks.
Since there's liquid circling inside the AIO, there is always a risk that your AIO can leak. While it's rare, it has happened. It's well known fact that liquids and electronics don't mix.


Because you plan to get 12 core and high power draw CPU, it also will produce a lot of heat. For such CPU, and when it comes to air cooling, only big boys are sufficient enough. Deepcool Gammax 400 Pro is mid-sized CPU cooler and good for mid-range CPUs. But for your high-end CPU, it is not enough. What is enough, is Noctua NH-D15 chromax.black,
link: https://www.elnekhelytechnology.com/fans-coolers/noctua-nh-d15-chromax-black

I checked the clearances and it fits barely, where CPU cooler height is 165mm with fans installed and your Gigabyte case also has up to 165mm of CPU cooler clearance.



Size wise, and since you've used 21" thus far, even 24" is upgrade. But 27" is better. Oh, if you are sitting behind desk, ~1m from monitor, 32" would give you ability to see individual pixels. So, it's up to you and how much money you have.


To pick a monitor, it's good when you know more about different monitor panel types. There are 3x kinds of monitor panels: TN, VA and IPS. Actually there are more (variations of the main three) but i focus on these main ones.

TN panel is oldest of the three and also cheapest. Where TN panel excels is it's performance, most notably response time (1ms).
Though, TN panel also has it's downsides. Prominent ones are: poor color accuracy (washed out colors), very narrow view angle and poor contrast ratio (max 1000:1).

Gaming wise, TN panel monitor is best suited for fast-paced games (FPS, racing etc), where you don't care as much about pretty colors as you do about smoothness of movements.

IPS panel has been around for some time and is also the most expensive of the three.
Where IPS panel excels is it's color accuracy, which is the best of the three. Also, it has widest viewing angles of the three.
But where IPS panel falls short is response time. IPS technology by design can't be any faster than 4ms (compared to the 1ms most TN panels are). Another area where IPS panel falls short is it's poor contrast ratio which is equal to a TN panel (max 1000:1), despite it's great color accuracy. This is most prominent when looking at black image and where black isn't black but instead gray or some form of blue. Refresh rates aren't IPS panel strong side either and many IPS panels are 60Hz, especially on higher resolutions. There are some 1440p 165Hz and 4K 120Hz IPS panel monitors out there but they are few and far apart, also costing a fortune.

Gaming wise, IPS panel monitor is best suited for slow-paced games (RPG, strategy etc), where you have time to see all those pretty colors and where smoothness of movements isn't that important.

VA panel is the newest of the three and price wise, it falls between TN and IPS. VA panel was created to take the best of both worlds (TN and IPS) and combine them.
Where VA panel excels is it's contrast ratio (min 3000:1), where you'd see the deepest and richest blacks. Also, it doesn't fall short on other aspects as well. VA panel color accuracy isn't as good as it is for IPS panel but it's close to the levels of IPS panel (considerably better than TN panel). It's viewing angle is also a notch smaller than that of an IPS panel but again, considerably better than that of a TN panel. Refresh rate wise, VA panel is more capable on different resolutions than IPS panel. Response time is another area where VA panel does good. While VA panel can't naturally be any faster than 4ms (just like IPS panel), it can achieve the magical 1ms response thanks to the software solution in it.
With VA panel monitors making waves lately, there aren't any major downsides of them. Availability used to be issue but not anymore.

Gaming wise, VA panel monitor is suited for all kinds of games. VA panel is like Jack of all trades but master of none.


So, if you want best contrast go with VA panel.

E.g: MSI 27 inch Optix G27C4 165hz 1ms Curved,
link: https://www.elnekhelytechnology.com/monitors/msi-27-inch-optix-g27c4
Outstanding Answer & effort, I can't thank you enough for these Information and for your precious time sir,

1- After watching the Video, I not installing windows 11 any sooner, windows 10 is just fine until they fix this.

2- I can't afford any card more expensive than 2060, so when it comes to render I understand your worries, I know that it may take 15 to 25 % more time than the other cards but I'm fine with this, its okay for now.

3- I ran into that article, all these MoBos are expensive here in Egypt, so I guess the Asus x570 is the best for now, and thanks for clarifying that X570 is more future proof.

4- Corsair It Is Then ;)

5-Okay I got your point, cooling fans and air flow is the priority here, I already changed my choice to the Lian Li Lancool II Mesh, its a great option for budget and AF.

6- I can't thank YOU enough for this storage solution! that's exactly what I needed some to explain to me

7- Okay I have chosen the Cooler Master MWE 650W 80 Plus Gold V2 Full Mod

8- Sir, you personally go with air coolers, end of discussion, I choose air coolers too
the NH-d15 is very very expensive, my limits for a cooler is 1500 EGP which can get me NH-U12, is it fine?

9-Sir, you're a genius! that's all I wanted to know, I've always been worried about that black color not looking so rich in the new monitors and I never knew how to avoid it while shopping for my next monitor !
I never knew the classification of TN,VN,IPS though I always hear IPS term,
That's why my Flatron-w2234s looks great., it has a label that says 5000:1 digital fine contrast, and its a TN panel type.
so I will definitely go with a higher contrast ratio, I shop for designing in the first place not the gaming so VN is Ideal, Actually the you've picked is absolutely great in budget and options! though i will try to find its 32" model.

In the end, I really can't thank you enough sir you've put a lot of time and effort to answer my inquires and this was really helpful in a way you can't imagine, THANK YOU! for all this info and for picking the parts as you were in my shoe.
 
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Teekiii

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Hyper 212 is okay, might be a little noisier than other similarly priced coolers. With that selection I would probably still take the Noctua NH-U12S Redux for 1000 over the 212. They perform similarly, but the cheap LED fans on the 212 aren't very good.

2x16GB 3600 would be ideal. But from that site, CL16 3600 is about 40% more. 3200 isn't terrible.

RTX2060 is mid-range, not a great graphics card. All about what you can afford here.

Not much future proofing to be had at the moment. AMD and Intel are near end of life for DDR4 based systems. If the board has the features you think you need now, it is good enough. There will be no further AM4 boards to switch to. Features that will be available with the AM5 socket will require you to upgrade the processor anyway.


Monitors is a whole topic. The very basics:

TN: Fast response times, poor color accuracy, poor viewing angles (1ms or less in some cases)
IPS: Best viewing angles, best color accuracy, slowest potential response times (there are expensive IPS displays that can do 1-2ms)
VA: A mix between TN and IPS. Response times are good, color accuracy is okay, viewing angles are fairly good (however, many VA panels are curved to increase accuracy, not good for sharing)

1920x1080, 2560x1440, 3820x2160 (4K)

Pixel density, larger the screen at a fixed resolution the lower the pixel density. Maximum recommended size for 1080p is 24", for 1440p 27", any larger and 4K is recommended to maintain image sharpness. Higher resolution means that at 100% scaling you can fit more things on the screen, which is helpful for workloads.

There are color accuracy standards: Adobe RGB, sRGB, and DCI-P3 being the common ones marketed. This is how closely a monitor can represent colors of actual things. Very important when making content that the color you see on the screen is the color that someone else will see on a similarly good monitor, or printed, etc. If you use a cheap TN panel, and assume that is accurate, it will look completely different on someone else's screen.
I understand that I am standing at the borderline from a new gen that's why I'm not spending too much on everything, after all its a budget built except for the CPU,

I now understand a lot about monitors thanks to you and the amazing Mr. Aeacus
so I should aim for VA 27"? I really want a 32" and I found this one here within my budget limits, is it good ? you know cuz its 1080

thanks in advance
 

Teekiii

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6,7 I will get the NVMe for OS, Progs, Games (thanks for clarifying that I should put games on the same SSD of OS)

Response: Just pointing out there isn't much benefit to getting a small SSD for the OS and a few programs, with costs as they are getting larger SSDs make more sense. You can always add additional drives if you like the concept of splitting up tasks. The important thing for such a system is to have backups, I still recommend an external hard drive that you regularly use to clone the system, or a least backup important files.

9, the problem with Noctua is its expensive! but if I have to I will but one, I'd really apprecaite it if you helped me choose a proper cooler over here, or from websites above, if better than noctua within a budget limit of [1500 EGP]

Response: with that budget I would stick with the Redux. The standard one performs a little better, but not worth the price difference.

10, a 4k 32" is way of my budget ! its very very expensive here in Egypt, I can afford 1080 in 32", would that be okay ?

Response: No, I think you would regret a 32" 1080p screen. Even a 27" is pushing the pixel density. I had one for years and it was not an enjoyable reading experience, you could see the pixels. 1440p 32" would be more acceptable, but run into similar issues.

Maybe look at some of the 27" 1440p, the only reasonable priced 28" 4K is out of stock on that website.
You're totally right about that, and I do make a clone backup on a WD Ext SSD regularly

Okay, I might go with Redux after all

Sorry about that monitor question I asked earlier, I haven't had read you last reply yet,
So no 32" at 1080p, you've made that clear, then the 27" at 1080p maybe the one to go after all unless I find a 1440p 32 or 27"
the most important thing that I understand how to choose now, thanks to you guys, I'm really thrilled :love:
 

Eximo

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I suggest a separate thread for the monitor, get some additional opinions. Not like that has to be purchased immediately.

Pixel density in PPI:
24" 1080p = 91.8 24" 1440p = 122.1
27" 1080p = 81.6 27" 1440p = 108.8 28" 4K = 157.3
32" 1080p = 68.8 32" 1440p = 91.8 34" 4K = 129.5

90-110 PPI is the recommended for best results at 100% scaling. Things will be the right size and clear/sharp. 32" 1080p is going to be well under the common recommendation. 32" 1440p is equivalent to 1080p at 24" so that would also work.
 

Aeacus

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8- Sir, you personally go with air coolers, end of discussion, I choose air coolers too
the NH-d15 is very very expensive, my limits for a cooler is 1500 EGP which can get me NH-U12, is it fine?
Since you have high power consumption CPU, it also needs adequate cooling. Just like when you have high power consumption GPU, you'll need adequate PSU to power it.

NH-U12 is best suited for CPUs with 65W TDP. Your CPU is 105W TDP, nearly twice of what the NH-U12 is suited for,
specs: https://noctua.at/en/nh-u12s/specification

Yes, you can go with NH-U12 and it does fine when PC is on idle. It may even suffice during gaming. But on workstation loads, where most or all CPU cores/threads are utilized long periods of time, it may not be enough.
If it isn't enough, you're looking towards 2nd fan on heatsink, to get push-pull. And if even that isn't enough, then CPU cooler upgrade would be in order. Or you don't let that many cores/threads to be utilized at once.

In the end, I really can't thank you enough sir you've put a lot of time and effort to answer my inquires and this was really helpful in a way you can't imagine, THANK YOU! for all this info and for picking the parts as you were in my shoe.
You're welcome. :geek:
 

Teekiii

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Since you have high power consumption CPU, it also needs adequate cooling. Just like when you have high power consumption GPU, you'll need adequate PSU to power it.

NH-U12 is best suited for CPUs with 65W TDP. Your CPU is 105W TDP, nearly twice of what the NH-U12 is suited for,
specs: https://noctua.at/en/nh-u12s/specification

Yes, you can go with NH-U12 and it does fine when PC is on idle. It may even suffice during gaming. But on workstation loads, where most or all CPU cores/threads are utilized long periods of time, it may not be enough.
If it isn't enough, you're looking towards 2nd fan on heatsink, to get push-pull. And if even that isn't enough, then CPU cooler upgrade would be in order. Or you don't let that many cores/threads to be utilized at once.



You're welcome. :geek:
First of all sorry for late reply that's due to time difference, its 8:43 am here

Secondly, yet another helpful reply ! I never paid attention to the TDP, In this case, literally, I'll pick this one NOCTUA NH-D15 , this is the lowest price I could find on the market here [2,200 EGP / 143 $] while the others are [2,750 EGP / 178.5 $], and the good new is IT'S BLACK ! and I love black,

Again thanks for your reply, and for being such a helpful person
 

Teekiii

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I suggest a separate thread for the monitor, get some additional opinions. Not like that has to be purchased immediately.

Pixel density in PPI:
24" 1080p = 91.8 24" 1440p = 122.1
27" 1080p = 81.6 27" 1440p = 108.8 28" 4K = 157.3
32" 1080p = 68.8 32" 1440p = 91.8 34" 4K = 129.5

90-110 PPI is the recommended for best results at 100% scaling. Things will be the right size and clear/sharp. 32" 1080p is going to be well under the common recommendation. 32" 1440p is equivalent to 1080p at 24" so that would also work.
Another gem ! this reply was very helpful, I now have an extended understanding that will help me choose the right one for me.

I'll take your advice for a separate thread for the monitor, but at least before I post it I have to have a few option to choose from within my budget limits, then people can help me decide which is better

Can't thank you enough man
 

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So to sum it all up, here's my final built suggestions:

CPU:
AMD RYZEN 9 5900X 12-Core 24-Threads

GPU:
Gigabyte GeForce RTX 2060 OC 6G

Motherboard:
ASUS X570-P PRIME ARGB ATX

RAM:
Corsair VENGEANCE LPX 16GB 3200MHz Cl16 DDR4 Memory

Storage:
Samsung 970 Evo Plus 250GB NVMe M.2 PCIe Gen 3.0 x 4, NVMe 1.3
& 2TB SSD


Case:
Lian Li - Lancool II Mesh RGB

PSU:
Cooler Master MWE 650W 80 PLUS Gold V2 Full Modular

Coolers:
Noctua NH D15 Chromax.Black


_
I really
can't thank you guys enough for the time you dedicated to read, search and share the best answers with me, if it wasn't for your help I'd have probably got the worst cooling Case and Cooler resulting in CPU limitation and shorter lifespan, Also you've helped me understand how to choose the most suitable monitor for me but that's another topic that I'll share in the monitors section, you've also shared storage solutions and made me feel sure about my choice of the MoBo and the GPU, not to mention suggesting a decent PSU instead of the poor one I was about to get.

Tom's hardware never disappointed me when it comes to expert consulting, to the all genius men who replied to me in detail, god bless you all.
 
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Aeacus

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! I never paid attention to the TDP, In this case, literally, I'll pick this one NOCTUA NH-D15 , this is the lowest price I could find on the market here [2,200 EGP / 143 $] while the others are [2,750 EGP / 178.5 $], and the good new is IT'S BLACK ! and I love black,
Interestingly enough, NH-D15 chromax.black was the very CPU cooler i suggested in the first place. :LOL:

Because you plan to get 12 core and high power draw CPU, it also will produce a lot of heat. For such CPU, and when it comes to air cooling, only big boys are sufficient enough. Deepcool Gammax 400 Pro is mid-sized CPU cooler and good for mid-range CPUs. But for your high-end CPU, it is not enough. What is enough, is Noctua NH-D15 chromax.black,
link: https://www.elnekhelytechnology.com/fans-coolers/noctua-nh-d15-chromax-black

I checked the clearances and it fits barely, where CPU cooler height is 165mm with fans installed and your Gigabyte case also has up to 165mm of CPU cooler clearance.
Clearance wise, and now with new Lian-Li case, you have it better, since Lian-Li has CPU cooler support up to 176mm. :)


Final build looks good. (y)
Oh, if you have a bit more money, you can buy 2 TB, 5400 RPM HDD as well, for backups.

Almost forgot: when you're assembling your PC, install the RAM before installing CPU cooler heatsink. It's easier this way.
 

Teekiii

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Interestingly enough, NH-D15 chromax.black was the very CPU cooler i suggested in the first place. :LOL:



Clearance wise, and now with new Lian-Li case, you have it better, since Lian-Li has CPU cooler support up to 176mm. :)


Final build looks good. (y)
Oh, if you have a bit more money, you can buy 2 TB, 5400 RPM HDD as well, for backups.

Almost forgot: when you're assembling your PC, install the RAM before installing CPU cooler heatsink. It's easier this way.
Hahahaha I never noticed that you've suggested to chromax.black, maybe I was focusing with the monitor more at that time, but any way with knowing HOW to choose the right cooler, I think it logically leads to choosing that NH-D15, which shows how you put yourself in the buyer's shoe and sincerely select for him the best option.

I always backup on external hard, but I don't think I backup in the proper way, I mean for instance, every time I backup the drive E I have to remove the old backup from the external hard (file called drive E) then copy the drive from the original PC, even though the mututal files between the old backup on the external that I've just deleted are a lot and it could save me some time if I found the proper way to do it,
Also I by buying the 2tb hdd for backup, do you mean that I can connect it as internal HDD and backup to it ? is that what you mean? and if yes, wouldn't that be dangerous, i mean if ransom hit the pc this HDD is exposed to the same thing? or you suggest plugging/unplugging when backing up / and in the Idle state?

Anyway I think I have to read and watch more about backing up techniques and I'm excited about it, and ofc I'll put the ram first :ROFLMAO:

Thanks man you're always a great help to me
 

Aeacus

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Also I by buying the 2tb hdd for backup, do you mean that I can connect it as internal HDD and backup to it ? is that what you mean? and if yes, wouldn't that be dangerous, i mean if ransom hit the pc this HDD is exposed to the same thing? or you suggest plugging/unplugging when backing up / and in the Idle state?
There are two main types of backup: live and offline.

Live backup, is where you have the backup drive connected to your PC at all times and can access it any time. This is very convenient since you don't have to connect and disconnect the drive at every backup. Also, you can run automated program that makes backup of specific files at specific time. E.g every day or every other day or every week etc.
Downside of live backup, is that when nasty malware should come, that encrypts all your drives, you can't get backup data from backup drive, since that too could be encrypted.

Live backups, in general, separate into 3 main groups:
  1. Program that backs up data to another drive. Or you do it manually, with copy/paste.
  2. RAID and it's many forms.
  3. Online backup, where data is uploaded to Cloud storage.
While Cloud storage is almost risk free, in terms of malware, i don't have much trust in it, since i'd be uploading my data to internet. And if it's in internet, there's no telling who may see it. Also, all uploaded data will be there for forever, even when you ask to delete Cloud storage data. Since there are sever backups and even when service provider has told you that your data is deleted per your request, you'll never know if they kept it.

Offline backup is, where you connect the drive only for backup process. Once the backup is done, you remove the drive from system and keep it in your cupboard or safe or any other place. This form of backup is safest since no-one can't access your backup, unless the drive itself is stolen. Downside is the hassle you have to go through to connect the drive and then do manual backup to it. Once done, you need to disconnect the drive (and remove it from PC). And that every time you do a backup.

I have combination of offline and live backup in use. Where in live backup, i do the manual copy/paste of my data.

When i buy new drive, one of my old drives, goes into offline backup (inside cupboard). While keeping the 3 drive setup. For example:
In my Skylake build (full specs with pics in my sig), i have 3 drives currently in use:
  • Samsung 960 Evo (500 GB) M.2 NVMe SSD - OS drive + games
  • Crucial MX500 (1 TB) 2.5" SSD - data drive (personal files)
  • Western Digital (1 TB) 7200 RPM 3.5" HDD - backup drive
I have bought a new drive for my system, but haven't had time to install it yet. New drive is Samsung 870 Evo (2 TB) 2.5" SSD. I plan to put my WD 1 TB HDD into offline storage, where my Crucial MX500 becomes my live backup and my new 870 Evo will become my new data drive. Resulting in:
  • Samsung 960 Evo (500 GB) M.2 NVMe SSD - OS drive + games
  • Samsung 870 Evo (2 TB) 2.5" SSD - data drive (personal files)
  • Crucial MX500 (1 TB) 2.5" SSD - backup drive
 
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Teekiii

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There are two main types of backup: live and offline.

Live backup, is where you have the backup drive connected to your PC at all times and can access it any time. This is very convenient since you don't have to connect and disconnect the drive at every backup. Also, you can run automated program that makes backup of specific files at specific time. E.g every day or every other day or every week etc.
Downside of live backup, is that when nasty malware should come, that encrypts all your drives, you can't get backup data from backup drive, since that too could be encrypted.

Live backups, in general, separate into 3 main groups:
  1. Program that backs up data to another drive. Or you do it manually, with copy/paste.
  2. RAID and it's many forms.
  3. Online backup, where data is uploaded to Cloud storage.
While Cloud storage is almost risk free, in terms of malware, i don't have much trust in it, since i'd be uploading my data to internet. And if it's in internet, there's no telling who may see it. Also, all uploaded data will be there for forever, even when you ask to delete Cloud storage data. Since there are sever backups and even when service provider has told you that your data is deleted per your request, you'll never know if they kept it.

Offline backup is, where you connect the drive only for backup process. Once the backup is done, you remove the drive from system and keep it in your cupboard or safe or any other place. This form of backup is safest since no-one can't access your backup, unless the drive itself is stolen. Downside is the hassle you have to go through to connect the drive and then do manual backup to it. Once done, you need to disconnect the drive (and remove it from PC). And that every time you do a backup.

I have combination of offline and live backup in use. Where in live backup, i do the manual copy/paste of my data.

When i buy new drive, one of my old drives, goes into offline backup (inside cupboard). While keeping the 3 drive setup. For example:
In my Skylake build (full specs with pics in my sig), i have 3 drives currently in use:
  • Samsung 960 Evo (500 GB) M.2 NVMe SSD - OS drive + games
  • Crucial MX500 (1 TB) 2.5" SSD - data drive (personal files)
  • Western Digital (1 TB) 7200 RPM 3.5" HDD - backup drive
I have bought a new drive for my system, but haven't had time to install it yet. New drive is Samsung 870 Evo (2 TB) 2.5" SSD. I plan to put my WD 1 TB HDD into offline storage, where my Crucial MX500 becomes my live backup and my new 870 Evo will become my new data drive. Resulting in:
  • Samsung 960 Evo (500 GB) M.2 NVMe SSD - OS drive + games
  • Samsung 870 Evo (2 TB) 2.5" SSD - data drive (personal files)
  • Crucial MX500 (1 TB) 2.5" SSD - backup drive
Well, the live backup is exactly what I avoid while backing up, because honestly I started to backup a year ago because I've precious data ofc but the main reason is I'm afraid on ransomware, so why would I connect the backup drive with the others, I'd call that archiving not backing up, and there's no way on earth I'd cloud store my data for the exact reason you've mentioned.

So, the only option I go with is save offline backup. that's the real deal here, If I get ransomware or my PC gets stolen for some reason or power failure fries the drives, I still got a save replica of my lifetime data.

I don't mind the hassle of connecting the external drive, The only thing I need to look into further is the technique of copying the files, I need to find a way to make it easier and skip the existing backed up files to save time and to save reads and writes.

And as usual thank you for the comprehensive summary you've made, I kinda got used to it, that well organized reply that gets into the point like a crash course hahahah :ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO:
 
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Aeacus

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or power failure fries the drives
For that, there is an UPS, which all PCs should have.
My Skylake and Haswell PCs are back up by UPS, one UPS per PC. Bought UPSes after last blackout made me loose 3 hours of work and that was the last straw. :mad:

Now, been using UPS for 3+ years and i'm very happy. Sure, there have been few blackouts but our UPSes have saved our work. Also, UPS protects against brownouts as well and it also has built-in AVR (Automatic Voltage Regulator), where my high-end PSUs get the best and cleanest power, since my UPSes are outputting true/pure sine wave, with line-interactive topology. :sol:

Oh, have you thought what happens when there is blackout at the very same moment when you're doing your backup? Since that (power loss) can corrupt your backup drive as well, since it's been written onto at that point. So, if you want it safe, look towards UPS. Though, good UPSes doesn't come cheap.

The only thing I need to look into further is the technique of copying the files, I need to find a way to make it easier and skip the existing backed up files to save time and to save reads and writes.
I know that there are automated programs out there that you can fine tune what, from which folder and at what time, the backup is made. Sadly, i'm not software expert (i'm specialized on hardware) and i can't tell which of the programs are good with great ease of use and which aren't. Might want to search TH forums and/or make a topic about it.
Little Google-Fu gave this result: https://www.techradar.com/best/best-free-backup-software
And here are the ones that cost money: https://www.techradar.com/best/best-backup-software

The two backup software that i have, are:
* Acronis True Image
Mine is quite old version, came with Kingston HyperX 3K 240 GB SSD, and it doesn't support M.2 drives and it is cumbersome to use. Since it's live CD, that boots into software, separate from OS (can only enter into it during boot up).
* Samsung Data Migration
Great software to clone whole disks. Downside is that it only supports Samsung drives and target drive. Source drive can be any.
 

Teekiii

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For that, there is an UPS, which all PCs should have.
My Skylake and Haswell PCs are back up by UPS, one UPS per PC. Bought UPSes after last blackout made me loose 3 hours of work and that was the last straw. :mad:

Now, been using UPS for 3+ years and i'm very happy. Sure, there have been few blackouts but our UPSes have saved our work. Also, UPS protects against brownouts as well and it also has built-in AVR (Automatic Voltage Regulator), where my high-end PSUs get the best and cleanest power, since my UPSes are outputting true/pure sine wave, with line-interactive topology. :sol:

Oh, have you thought what happens when there is blackout at the very same moment when you're doing your backup? Since that (power loss) can corrupt your backup drive as well, since it's been written onto at that point. So, if you want it safe, look towards UPS. Though, good UPSes doesn't come cheap.



I know that there are automated programs out there that you can fine tune what, from which folder and at what time, the backup is made. Sadly, i'm not software expert (i'm specialized on hardware) and i can't tell which of the programs are good with great ease of use and which aren't. Might want to search TH forums and/or make a topic about it.
Little Google-Fu gave this result: https://www.techradar.com/best/best-free-backup-software
And here are the ones that cost money: https://www.techradar.com/best/best-backup-software

The two backup software that i have, are:
* Acronis True Image
Mine is quite old version, came with Kingston HyperX 3K 240 GB SSD, and it doesn't support M.2 drives and it is cumbersome to use. Since it's live CD, that boots into software, separate from OS (can only enter into it during boot up).
* Samsung Data Migration
Great software to clone whole disks. Downside is that it only supports Samsung drives and target drive. Source drive can be any.
It's funny how this topic keeps opening my eyes on these thing that might be taken for granted if you live in Europe or USA, but for us living in Egypt the high prices of these devices its taken for granted not to buy them, I'll definitely consider buying an UPS for my PC even though it might happen one or two months later as I have to save money for them they kinda expensive here as I said.
Electricity blacks out here a lot maybe 1 time every week or every two weeks, I won't stand one of these blackouts during a backup, can't even imagine that.


(i'm specialized on hardware), Hell you are !! hahaha, don't worry I'll study for the best software to ease my backup process, I'm just not focusing on this topic as I have a million open tabs trying to solve the Gaming/Graphic Design monitor dilemma and I'm about to post a topic in the monitors section now because I'm really lost.

Thanks you for your amazing reply as usual, I'm really grateful for all these info:love::geek:
 
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Aeacus

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It's funny how this topic keeps opening my eyes on these thing that might be taken for granted if you live in Europe or USA, but for us living in Egypt the high prices of these devices its taken for granted not to buy them, I'll definitely consider buying an UPS for my PC even though it might happen one or two months later as I have to save money for them they kinda expensive here as I said.
Electricity blacks out here a lot maybe 1 time every week or every two weeks, I won't stand one of these blackouts during a backup, can't even imagine that.
I live in EU (Estonia) and while the power grid here is really good, blackouts can still happen. Random ones 1-2 times a year, while scheduled ones 2-3 times a year (i get a notification, one week in advance, when power in my area is gone due to maintenance and for how long). Despite we having a good power grid, it isn't 100% fault proof. And due to that, i bought UPSes as well. UPSes, good ones, doesn't come cheap in this part of the world either. I had to fork out €230.10 EUR, per UPS (4202.19 EGP). But it's just a small fraction of what my PC costed. :sweatsmile:

trying to solve the Gaming/Graphic Design monitor dilemma and I'm about to post a topic in the monitors section now because I'm really lost.
When you've popped a topic in TH about your monitor, let me know and i can join you there as well. ;)
 

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