[SOLVED] Upgrading compatibility and thoughts

Feb 21, 2019
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Hey guys. Quick question regarding compatibility.

Current PC Specs:
CPU: i7 8700 3.2ghz
CPU Cooler: Akasa nero 3.0
Motherboard: Gigabyte Z370 HD3 OP
RAM: Corsair Vengeance LPX 3x4gb (i know... dual channelling 3 sticks is bad..)
Storage: 120gb ssd
GPU: GTX 1070
PSU: Corsair CX650
win 10.

in the near future I'll be upgrading hopefully to:

RAM: Vengeance or Dominator 3200mhz 2x16gb
SSD: Samsung 970 EVO Plus 1 TB NVMe M.2 Internal SSD
GPU: MSI GeForce RTX 2080 Ti 11 GB GAMING X TRIO Video Card

Question is will this PSU/CPU Cooler support what I'll be putting in? I'm guessing not but I really don't know.
I listed the upgraded parts in more detail incase anyone has any thoughts on whether on not they're worth the buy.

Thanks.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
The CPU cooler is likely good enough for THAT CPU, but would not do well with an unlocked CPU like the 8700k, 9700k or 9900k, especially if overclocked but probably even at the stock configuration. That is to say, it would work, but it might be toeing the line.

As is, you could probably keep that CPU cooler, even for your 8700, and add a much better fan that would increase performance while also lowering sound levels, for around 25 bucks or so.

As far as the PSU is concerned, no, you do not want to use THAT power supply with that graphics card. It's like using bias ply tires on a Corvette.

If you've had it for a while, even less so.

I'd recommend getting a GOOD quality 650w unit if you don't plan to do any manual overclocking of the graphics card and a GOOD 750w model if you do. A good 750w model wouldn't be a bad idea in any case especially if you plan to run several drives, many case fans, lighting, or other accessories that might significantly add to the bottom line.

 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
The CPU cooler is likely good enough for THAT CPU, but would not do well with an unlocked CPU like the 8700k, 9700k or 9900k, especially if overclocked but probably even at the stock configuration. That is to say, it would work, but it might be toeing the line.

As is, you could probably keep that CPU cooler, even for your 8700, and add a much better fan that would increase performance while also lowering sound levels, for around 25 bucks or so.

As far as the PSU is concerned, no, you do not want to use THAT power supply with that graphics card. It's like using bias ply tires on a Corvette.

If you've had it for a while, even less so.

I'd recommend getting a GOOD quality 650w unit if you don't plan to do any manual overclocking of the graphics card and a GOOD 750w model if you do. A good 750w model wouldn't be a bad idea in any case especially if you plan to run several drives, many case fans, lighting, or other accessories that might significantly add to the bottom line.

 
Feb 21, 2019
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Thanks a lot for your timely and thorough reply!

So would you say that if I were to, perhaps, add a Seasonic PRIME Ultra Gold 750W PSU along with a Noctua CPU Cooler and a few NF-A14 fans I'd be good to go?

I haven't looked yet but will I be needing a M.2 M-key adaptor for the NVMe ssd?
*I actually just remembered, I have some Intel Optane memory on this system, do I replace that with the new ssd?
 
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Feb 21, 2019
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I THINK many moons ago, about 6 or 7 years ago I might've used overclockers system where you pick the parts and they put it together. Since then I've been upgrading parts to where almost everything is replaced except the SSD and HDD.
 
Feb 21, 2019
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I intend on buying it new. I read some reviews on that specific model (MSI GeForce RTX 2080 Ti 11 GB GAMING X TRIO Video Card ) and it seemed to pass with flying colors.

I game at 1080p and will be connecting 3 monitors but using specifically the Asus ROG PG258Q @ 240Hz for gaming. Competitive gamer and the pc will be used MOSTLY but not solely for that purpose so 300fps with all graphics settings on low is usually the goal. Also want it to be capable of streaming and video editing.
 
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Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Your CPU is going to be the determining factor for FPS, not the graphics card. An RTX 2070 is MORE than capable enough for FULL ULTRA gaming on a 1080p monitor no matter how many non-active gaming screens are also attached. Screens not actively used FOR gaming, have very little impact on GPU load.

No need to waste the money on a 2080 TI just for that. Since I doubt you plan to edit video and stream WHILE gaming, it's probably also not a necessity there either. Plus, depending on what software you use, the CPU might be the bigger deal on that as well.

I'd save the extra money you were going to spend on the GPU card and put it towards a higher end CPU if it were me, although, that isn't a high end motherboard and you COULD run into troubles with a higher TDP CPU.
 
Feb 21, 2019
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Thanks for these replies, some great advice. The 2080ti was a little present and a bit of future proofing all in one. I'd originally thought the 2070 would be fine,.. and then the 2070S was supposed to be a similar price when it released or something like that, so I'd been dithering over it all. (Nothing has been purchased yet)

I plan to stream (as in twitch stream via obs) @ 720p/60fps.
I can manage this on my current system with a mild, but not unnoticeable performance drop of about 50-70 frames. I'd like to be able to stream with less of a fps hit as I don't yet have a dedicated streaming PC. (This is with current games such as overwatch. Apex had more of a hit) I'd like to be able to continue into future games with optimal performance and with streaming combined.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Ok, so in any case, regarding compatibility, I'd need to know the exact model of the memory kit you are targeting for purchase in order to determine if it is actually compatible or not. The speed and type of memory are fine, but not every memory module is compatible with every motherboard. For Intel, which is VERY tolerant compared to AMD/Ryzen, most memory kits will work however these days there are a number of memory kits that are specifically intended for AMD with timings that may not favor Intel platforms, or some few kits that simply don't work well with a given motherboard. Best that we verify before you purchase, and the motherboard QVL list is generally not the go to source for compatibility.

The memory manufacturers compatibility list is usually a lot more accurate.

The graphics card will obviously work with that configuration, but like I said, the PSU is not a good fit for a graphics card of that level of performance. I'd probably look at a 650-750 Seasonic Prime Ultra unit. Something like this. Obviously, it doesn't have to be this good of a PSU, however many of the Seasonic Focus and Focus plus units have had some issues and have now been revised with corrections to the protections. At least for a while, I'd avoid them unless you can verify that what you are getting is one of the newer revisions.

This would be a really good choice unless you have plans to custom sleeve your PSU cables yourself, and then you probably want a Prime Ultra Titanium which does not have inline capacitors like the Focus, or Prime Gold, or most everything else out there these days. If you BUY already sleeved cables, they won't have the inline caps and you'll see a slight increase in ripple, which isn't really a big problem but something you should be aware of. If you plan to sleeve, you should buy a unit that has internal caps for ripple filtering, not inline ones.

PCPartPicker Part List

Power Supply: SeaSonic PRIME Ultra Gold 650 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply ($139.60 @ Amazon)
Total: $139.60
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2020-01-07 21:18 EST-0500
 
Feb 21, 2019
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Ughhh. . Really provided me with some food for thought, all of this. Please comment on whether what I'm saying below is in any way correct. Thank you. (also, I apologise, when I first got to thinking about this I was just going to buy a better gfx card and knew I needed some ram.. Didn't expect to end up getting into so much detail)

My current headspace is this.. I have 2 options but leaning toward one.

First of all, when I research more into fps/streaming/gpus/cpus what I learn is that first person shooters are more GPU dependent than CPU (this can go the opposite way when dealing with games which focus largely on environment), whereas streaming is more CPU dependent than GPU.

Once I buy new parts I'll basically have 2 PC's, which in my head would look something like this:

PC1 (GPU focused):

CPU: i7-8700
GPU: RTX2070S
Motherboard: Motherboard: Gigabyte Z370 HD3 OP
RAM: 2x16GB Vengeance RGB Pro@3200mhz
PSU: Seasonic PRIME Ultra Gold 650W
Storage: 970 EVO Plus 1TB m.2 NVME

PC2 (CPU Focused)
CPU: i9-9900K
GPU: GTX1070
RAM: (Whats currently in my pc - 3x4GB Vengeance LPX@3200mhz)
PSU: Corsair CPX650 (The better PSU is in the PC with the better GPU - is this correct?)
Storage: ssd

(with this option I'll be needing a new motherboard. I have no idea which of the 2 PC's it would be better utilised on.)

The other option, and one im leaning to, is to make just the 1 PC:

CPU: i9-9900K
GPU: RTX2070S
Motherboard: Gigabyte Z370 HD3 OP (Im guessing this will then also need upgraded?)
RAM: 2x16GB Vengeance RGB Pro@3200mhz
PSU: Seasonic PRIME Ultra Gold 650W (or the 750W)
Storage: 970 EVO Plus 1TB m.2 NVME

I hear that the architecture of the RTX series make having a dedicated streaming PC less necessary.
(I don't know whether or not using an i9 as a dedicated streaming machine is total overkill or not. Please feel free to berate me in the comments.)

Thank you again for your time.
 
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Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
You will have problems with the 9900k on that board. Even without overclocking, that 4+3 VRM that lacks any doubling is going to suffer under high or extended loads with a 9900k installed IMO.

I don't really think you NEED two systems, but I also understand that a lot of streamers use them to good effect so that's up to you.

I'd probably hold off on doing anything with a different board and CPU, for now, until you have the chance to try the system with the other hardware you intend to add. You may find that it works fine for your purposes and if you find it doesn't, and that you NEED to make additional additions or changes, you can easily do so with nothing lost in the process. No sense in buying things you don't need, until you can determine that you do in fact need them.

I'd just do the PSU, graphics card and memory for now and then keep in mind if you DO decide to upgrade to a higher end CPU like the 9700k or 9900k, that Akasa CPU cooler isn't going to cut it so there is going to need to also be an additional component added to the list there as well. For stock operation on those CPUs you could do something like the Thermalright Macho Rev.C for around 60 bucks or a variety of other, better coolers, that are a little more.

Even adding better fans to that Akasa heatsink isn't going to help a whole lot if you go with a much higher TDP processor like the 9700k or 9900k. Keep in mind, the TDP listed by intel is for base clock operations only. Boost behaviors dramatically increase the actual TDP for those processors.
 
Feb 21, 2019
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Alright. Thanks for the help over the last day or 2. I think I'll take some time to digest it all and then do what you said and upgrade the psu/memory/gpu first and see how that goes.

Much appreciated.
 

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