[SOLVED] Upgrading from 7600k to 13600k performance difference?

avizacty

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I getting a new i5 13600k tomorrow and I am (looking to be) pairing it with a Gigabyte B660M Elite, and the newer Hyper 212 EVO, and I am putting the question out there, how much performance difference will I see in new games like MWII, paired with a 1070?

My current system is running an i5 7600k and a 1070, and it struggles in modern cpu heavy games, and my ram is currently 32GB 2666Mhz. I will begin by upgrading my CPU (Mobo and cooler then ofcourse), new DDR4 sticks in January or February, and a new 40- or 30 series GPU in mid 2023, but, how good will I perform with just that CPU upgrade in the meantime?

I am aware that 1070 is quite old for games like MWII, but I also know my 7600k bottlenecks now alot at barely 1080p and 50fps in certain MWII maps.

I am also currently running a (2019) Corsair RM750X

Appreciate any thoughts or comments, thanks:)
 
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Karadjgne

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Moving up from a 7600k to a 13600k would be like moving up from a moped to a 1000cc race motorcycle. That's the possibile performance upgrade.

But, that is tempered by the 1070 speed limit. In some instances you'll see no difference. That simply means the 7600k was strong enough to max out the 1070 ability, so a more powerful cpu does nothing of any use. In some games you'll see a massive performance uplift, especially in high member multi-player online games with high Ai levels. It's there that the stronger cpu will make a huge difference and fps goes way up, until it hits the 1070 speed limit.

So your performance expectations will vary greatly, depending entirely on the game played.
 
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avizacty

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Why not just record or write down what you get in these maps now, do the same for the new gear, and then compare?
I will do this, I have saved benchmarks and I will probably update in this thread how things go once I have got it all working.
Just a cheeky question so I am able to manage my expectations once I actually go out of my way to buy it.
//Excited PC boi
 
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jnjnilson6

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Hereunder - the difference in pure processing power. (Doesn't constitute a synonymous difference in gaming, but a purely perfunctory and encompassing difference; the prevalence of dazzling binary falling whitely through the unintelligible spaces of computing frequency, throwing the older processor aback in thorough comparison.)

 

USAFRet

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I getting a new i5 13600k tomorrow and I am (looking to be) pairing it with a Gigabyte B660M Elite, and the newer Hyper 212 EVO, and I am putting the question out there, how much performance difference will I see in new games like MWII, paired with a 1070?

My current system is running an i5 7600k and a 1070, and it struggles in modern cpu heavy games, and my ram is currently 32GB 2666Mhz. I will begin by upgrading my CPU (Mobo and cooler then ofcourse), new DDR4 sticks in January or February, and a new 40- or 30 series GPU in mid 2023, but, how good will I perform with just that CPU upgrade in the meantime?

I am aware that 1070 is quite old for games like MWII, but I also know my 7600k bottlenecks now alot at barely 1080p and 50fps in certain MWII maps.

I am also currently running a (2019) Corsair RM750X

Appreciate any thoughts or comments, thanks:)
Whatever motherboard you have with the current i5-7600k is not applicable to the new i5-13600k CPU.
So you have to change both the CPU and motherboard.

And along with this change, a new OS install.
 
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jnjnilson6

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Whatever motherboard you have with the current i5-7600k is not applicable to the new i5-13600k CPU.
So you have to change both the CPU and motherboard.

And along with this change, a new OS install.
I remember when back in the day laptops and computers came with useful manuals and disks with drivers. Now if you've got a very new machine for which the drivers are not recognized by Windows you'd need to search about things like:
  • Disk drivers (for Partitions to be recognized through Installation if the disk is too new)
  • Internet driver (otherwise use Internet through cable while installing)
  • Touchpad driver (add an external mouse while installing)
  • Audio driver (to take care of after installation)
This is the case with newer laptops. Most people wouldn't be able to dream of doing this. It was so much easier and better explained and clean back in the day. Like say about 2005-2010.

They could write a small manual about all the drivers which ought not be detected initially and add a USB drive with the necessary drivers along the machine; but for some reason this is not done - probably to fill up the wallets of people in the hardware / hardware repair business. Everything is beautiful and happy once you've drenched your mind in paying up and lending your new machine to foreign hands or preserving self-composure, breathing in deeply and losing a day or two in slightly trembling agonies.
 

jnjnilson6

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Yeah....outdated drivers and docs in the box.

Now, the drivers are trivially available at the manufacturers website, up to date.

Takes about 5 minutes to find and download all of that to a small flash drive.
I imagine an unconditional person with immaculately trembling eyes and hands rushing innocuously toward the machine, plugging in the Windows USB and seeing the hard drive is not recognized and simply falling flat on their backs; or if by some miracle people of such strata ought to come across a worthwhile revelation as to the aforementioned problem, them being tripped naughtily by the naughty WiFi drivers and finding and connecting a cable to the PC, but finding out that just any naughty cable would do naught instead of aught for them.

Most people would not know what to do in these cases at all. While back in the day you got your disk with the drivers and your manual and things went on so smoothly a little boy would be able to install Windows XP or 7 and the drivers alongside. There were no numbened situations in which you'd look ahead blankly and not understand or realize what to do; when you don't see the hard drive; when you cannot move the mouse; when the first Windows Updates will not automatically install doggone it! And all that slapping you right ahead, first thing you boot up the machine for the first time. No smoothness, no surety, no stability to the point you feel glad and worthwhile; you're thrown down the endless stairway of confusion and nerve-wracking experiences and it winds and winds and never ends. (stated metaphorically).
 

USAFRet

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I imagine an unconditional person with immaculately trembling eyes and hands rushing innocuously toward the machine, plugging in the Windows USB and seeing the hard drive is not recognized and simply falling flat on their backs; or if by some miracle people of such strata ought to come across a worthwhile revelation as to the aforementioned problem, them being tripped naughtily by the naughty WiFi drivers and finding and connecting a cable to the PC, but finding out that just any naughty cable would do naught instead of aught for them.

Most people would not know what to do in these cases at all. While back in the day you got your disk with the drivers and your manual and things went on so smoothly a little boy would be able to install Windows XP or 7 and the drivers alongside. There were no numbened situations in which you'd look ahead blankly and not understand or realize what to do; when you don't see the hard drive; when you cannot move the mouse; when the first Windows Updates will not automatically install doggone it! And all that slapping you right ahead, first thing you boot up the machine for the first time. No smoothness, no surety, no stability to the point you feel glad and worthwhile; you're thrown down the endless stairway of confusion and nerve-wracking experiences and it winds and winds and never ends. (stated metaphorically).
If you buy something prebuilt, just plug it in and it should work.
Desktop or laptop.

If you're buying parts, building it yourself, and installing your OS....then prepare a teeny bit.
 
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Karadjgne

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Moving up from a 7600k to a 13600k would be like moving up from a moped to a 1000cc race motorcycle. That's the possibile performance upgrade.

But, that is tempered by the 1070 speed limit. In some instances you'll see no difference. That simply means the 7600k was strong enough to max out the 1070 ability, so a more powerful cpu does nothing of any use. In some games you'll see a massive performance uplift, especially in high member multi-player online games with high Ai levels. It's there that the stronger cpu will make a huge difference and fps goes way up, until it hits the 1070 speed limit.

So your performance expectations will vary greatly, depending entirely on the game played.
 
Reactions: avizacty
I getting a new i5 13600k tomorrow and I am (looking to be) pairing it with a Gigabyte B660M Elite, and the newer Hyper 212 EVO, and I am putting the question out there, how much performance difference will I see in new games like MWII, paired with a 1070?

My current system is running an i5 7600k and a 1070, and it struggles in modern cpu heavy games, and my ram is currently 32GB 2666Mhz. I will begin by upgrading my CPU (Mobo and cooler then ofcourse), new DDR4 sticks in January or February, and a new 40- or 30 series GPU in mid 2023, but, how good will I perform with just that CPU upgrade in the meantime?

I am aware that 1070 is quite old for games like MWII, but I also know my 7600k bottlenecks now alot at barely 1080p and 50fps in certain MWII maps.

I am also currently running a (2019) Corsair RM750X

Appreciate any thoughts or comments, thanks:)
The difference should be very noticeable even with a 1070, a number of games are not very smooth on 4 core/4 thread CPU's now. You won't get the most out of it with a 1070 but it's still beneficial.
 

avizacty

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Oct 8, 2017
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Whatever motherboard you have with the current i5-7600k is not applicable to the new i5-13600k CPU.
So you have to change both the CPU and motherboard.

And along with this change, a new OS install.
I have successfully replaced all parts,
Decided to go with;
Aorus Z690 Elite AX DDR5
Kingston Fury DDR5 4800MHz
Be Quiet! Pure Rock 2

Successfully flashed the bios to work with my new 13th gen i5.

I had about an hour in the evening after installing everything, and windows booted up exactly like normal, and I did not encounter any issues and I was able to benchmark, and it looked like Windows was handling it well.

But now, if it's really necessary, I'm wondering, how am I supposed to reinstall windows? As I understand there are many methods of doing so but I would like to know the best one after such a big change to the computer.

Thanks :)
 
But now, if it's really necessary, I'm wondering, how am I supposed to reinstall windows?
You can get away with not reinstalling but if you've moved to a completely new platform it's more ideal if you do have a fresh install. If your logged onto the PC then you could just reset your PC. Hit start type 'reset this PC' and follow the instructions. Obviously you should backup everything first. Now might not be a bad time to move to Windows 11, it has a scheduler optimised for the hybrid architecture of Alder/Raptor Lake.
 
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Karadjgne

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If moving to Win11, that can be lengthy, to get right. Because you'll do it twice. The first time does only one thing of value, reassign your Win10 registration key to Win11. The second time is the important one because that's a clean install, not an update, so all the old Win10 stuff will be gone, clean registry, clean windows.
 

avizacty

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Oct 8, 2017
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If moving to Win11, that can be lengthy, to get right. Because you'll do it twice. The first time does only one thing of value, reassign your Win10 registration key to Win11. The second time is the important one because that's a clean install, not an update, so all the old Win10 stuff will be gone, clean registry, clean windows.
Just got home, straight away going to win 11 because I've been wanting to anyway, then I'll do the reinstall.

First issue here though, for some reason my main monitor decides to sometimes turn itself off and only displays again when I replug the DP cable, happens only when I start my PC up.
Is this windows related or power supply related? I figured a RM750X should still hold up for an i5 13th gen and only a 1070, but I'll see it as windows needs a fresh reinstall and I'll troubleshoot it if it occurs in windows 11 after the reinstalls.
 

Karadjgne

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Both DP and HDMI are not direct feed, the way DVi and VGA are. They require a 'handshake' like what usually happens when you plug a USB in and you get the notification 'ding' (USB also requires a handshake). What that is is 1 of those pins initiates communication between the monitor and port and says 'hey wake up! ' to the necessary drivers and port recognition. If that handshake doesn't happen for any reason, or happens too soon for the monitor to respond properly, the port isn't 'woke up', so the gpu remains waiting to decide just what's plugged in or not.

Sometimes it's nothing more than the DP/HDMI is a different/older version, and while compatible it still takes a second to get communications straight, and times out. This can happen when there's conflicting info in Windows, like you upgraded the board, and Windows is still trying to enable the old ports, not the new ones.

So getting a clean install of the OS is recommended and should fix all that as well as any other chipset, audio chipset, Lan, USB, driver issues, registry issues or conflicts that you have as yet to discover.
 
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