[SOLVED] UPS, AVR and PC correlation

May 29, 2021
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Can i just use AVR to protect my PC? or maybe there are another way i can do to protect my PC?

Situation on here are quite unpredictable, sometime its blackout for 1-2 min.
and it happen like at least once or twice a day.

Tbh i cant afford an UPS due to expensive shipping cost. its like 4-7 $ / KG and we know a UPS weight more than 8> kg.
Before you call me cheap, in here our average salary are around 300-400$ a month.
 

Paperdoc

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We cannot really tell you whether the power system where you are is likely to cause substantial voltage spikes frequently. All we know is that it is unreliable in the sense that it does produce NO power frequently, for periods of a few minutes. And it is the SPIKES of high voltage that are dangerous to your system. Most PSU's are designed to deal with some spikes, and to survive a voltage sag or even NO voltage if it lasts only a second or two. But is it true that frequent large spikes are dangerous, and an AVR can protect for those.

I will comment that a much simpler device, a Surge Protector (often included in some form in a "power bar") is NOT an AVR. Those devices are useful only where voltage surges are rare. Their major problem is that the protection device in a Surge Protector works once by being destroyed by the surge, but then the power bar STILL works with NO further spike protection, so you don't even know the protection is gone! For your situation an AVR is the right thing for frequent spikes IF that is what you are experiencing.
 
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May 29, 2021
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An AVR will only deal with voltage spikes or sags that last less than about 1 to 2 sec. If you have an outage longer than that, it does NOT prevent system shut-down.
Do i still need AVR to deal with those Voltage Spikes? or my PSU can handle it?
My current psu are Be Quiet Pure Power 11 500w
 
May 29, 2021
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Likely a good application for a laptop which contains it's own battery backup.

Beyond that you might consider reading up on a method by which you could create your own backup solution. An inverter/charging circuit and a couple of batteries.....
About the batteries. was thinking about this before, but i wasnt sure about what i read.

some article say i need deep cycle batteries. what the hell is that lol?
im no engineer or IT background.

also what really happen if i use Motorcycle batteries? since this most common things i can find around.
 

Paperdoc

Champion
Ambassador
We cannot really tell you whether the power system where you are is likely to cause substantial voltage spikes frequently. All we know is that it is unreliable in the sense that it does produce NO power frequently, for periods of a few minutes. And it is the SPIKES of high voltage that are dangerous to your system. Most PSU's are designed to deal with some spikes, and to survive a voltage sag or even NO voltage if it lasts only a second or two. But is it true that frequent large spikes are dangerous, and an AVR can protect for those.

I will comment that a much simpler device, a Surge Protector (often included in some form in a "power bar") is NOT an AVR. Those devices are useful only where voltage surges are rare. Their major problem is that the protection device in a Surge Protector works once by being destroyed by the surge, but then the power bar STILL works with NO further spike protection, so you don't even know the protection is gone! For your situation an AVR is the right thing for frequent spikes IF that is what you are experiencing.
 
Reactions: Not The Shadow

punkncat

Dignified
Ambassador
About the batteries. was thinking about this before, but i wasnt sure about what i read.

some article say i need deep cycle batteries. what the hell is that lol?
im no engineer or IT background.

also what really happen if i use Motorcycle batteries? since this most common things i can find around.
There are numerous types of power supply/converters/inverters on the market that would have to be specific to your local voltage. Motorcycle type batteries should be fine, really any type of sealed battery. My UPS uses two 12V batteries, but I am unsure of their specific rating, typically a higher amp hour will give longer run time.

Likely setup would be a charging circuit hooked to the batteries which are in turn hooked to an inverter that produces the voltage and wattage needed to run the equipment you don't want to go down. With the explosion of people interested in "tiny homes" and the RV/travel thing there are loads of how to on the market that walk you through how to make an appropriate device.
 
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