Question UPS recommendations

bob112

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Jul 10, 2018
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My UPS keeps beeping when ever I play something more advanced then rimworld so I think I need something more powerful I'm kinda new to the world of UPS's so I need some recommendations on what to get this is my pc specs
CPU:AMD Ryzen 5 4500 6 core processor
Motherboard:ASRock B550 phantom gaming 4/ac
Ram:Viper 32GB
SSD/HDD: netac NVMe SSD 1TB, Corsair force GS SSD, Seagate ST2000DM001-1CH164 2TB HDD
GPU: NVIDIA GEFORCE GTX 1080TI
PSU: Corsair TX 650w
OS:windows 10 home
Monitor 1:ASUS VS278
Monitor 2: Samsung syncmaster
External hard drives: Seagate FreeAgent USB Device 1TB, WD Game Drive USB Device 8TB

My current UPS is a Powercool Line Interactive 650VA
 

kanewolf

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My UPS keeps beeping when ever I play something more advanced then rimworld so I think I need something more powerful I'm kinda new to the world of UPS's so I need some recommendations on what to get this is my pc specs
CPU:AMD Ryzen 5 4500 6 core processor
Motherboard:ASRock B550 phantom gaming 4/ac
Ram:Viper 32GB
SSD/HDD: netac NVMe SSD 1TB, Corsair force GS SSD, Seagate ST2000DM001-1CH164 2TB HDD
GPU: NVIDIA GEFORCE GTX 1080TI
PSU: Corsair TX 650w
OS:windows 10 home
Monitor 1:ASUS VS278
Monitor 2: Samsung syncmaster
External hard drives: Seagate FreeAgent USB Device 1TB, WD Game Drive USB Device 8TB

My current UPS is a Powercool Line Interactive 650VA
The best answer is to get a meter and measure the actual power usage of your PC. Something like this -- https://www.amazon.com/P3-P4400-Electricity-Usage-Monitor/dp/B00009MDBU (US model but they have similar for all countries).
Once you know the actual usage from your PC, then you can properly size a UPS.
 
Does it have any kind of message to tell you what the beep means.

My guess is your is pulling over the power limit on your UPS. From what I can tell that UPS is only rated to 390 watts. Hard to say what your pc is actually using it is not likely anywhere near the 650watt your power supply could provide.

It could be something completely different which is why it would be nice to know what the beep means.

As mentioned above you need to somehow find out how much power you are actually using. Next all UPS numbers you see are VA numbers the watts they can produce are a lot less,check the actual watts in the detailed specs to be sure.
In addition the va and watt numbers do not tell you how long the UPS will run on battery. That you also must read the specs for. You for example will find a UPS with the same va and watt reading that has 1 battery inside and another that has 2 batteries. Assuming the batteries are identical the second ups will run almost 2 times as long.

What I always joked with people is the more the UPS weighs the better it is. This is not really true but more batteries always increase the weight.
 

bob112

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Jul 10, 2018
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The manual says that the beep means 'that the connected equipment exceeds the specified maximum load' I got the UPS because the guy in the shop that repaired my pc after the motherboard fried convinced me to get in said that it would help prevent the new motherboard frying the same way( plugged the mains power of my pc back into the wall socket after a I'd unplugged it because there was a thunderstorm there was a slight flash in the wall socket as I was plugging my pc back in and then my pc wouldn't switch back on) and to buy me a bit of time to turn my pc off properly if there was a power cut.
I'm a UK resident if that helps anything
Edit:just remembered sorry if this is a stupid question but everything that plugs into my pc that needs to be plugged into the mains as well is plugged into a powerstrip that is plugged into my UPS could that be part of the reason why it beeps to tell me that I'm exceeding the specified maximum load?
 
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The newer ups I have are fancy and they actually tell me how much power is being used as a number. The older one just has a row of 5 led that light up as you draw more power.

Does your UPS have anyway to guess how much power the equipment is using. It would be the total of everything plugged into the UPS.

The kilowatt device kanewolf linked is very nice for this. It has other uses for looking at things like if the wall or maybe even the UPS is putting out the correct voltages.

Note a UPS does not seem to always protect you from thunderstorms. I have pretty much every device I own on one of many UPS... I collected a few from when I used to live where the power went off all the time. In addition I have surge protection strips on many of these both in front of and behind the UPS.

I had a lighting strike somewhere close but it did not hit the house. I had all kinds of stuff get destroyed all over the house on different ups and circuits. Stuff like outside security cameras that were powered from on a switch that still works and in other cases it burn out ethernet ports in pc or even the onboard video on one. Lots of power blocks destroyed. All the UPS themselves are perfectly fine. From what I can tell they did not even click over a bunch of equipment just turned off because it was damaged.
 

kanewolf

Titan
Moderator
The manual says that the beep means 'that the connected equipment exceeds the specified maximum load' I got the UPS because the guy in the shop that repaired my pc after the motherboard fried convinced me to get in said that it would help prevent the new motherboard frying the same way( plugged the mains power of my pc back into the wall socket after a I'd unplugged it because there was a thunderstorm there was a slight flash in the wall socket as I was plugging my pc back in and then my pc wouldn't switch back on) and to buy me a bit of time to turn my pc off properly if there was a power cut.
I'm a UK resident if that helps anything
Edit:just remembered sorry if this is a stupid question but everything that plugs into my pc that needs to be plugged into the mains as well is plugged into a powerstrip that is plugged into my UPS could that be part of the reason why it beeps to tell me that I'm exceeding the specified maximum load?
This would be the UK power meter example -- https://www.amazon.co.uk/Nevsetpo-Monitor-Consumption-Electricity-Calculator/dp/B07H1ZFVFM/
 

bob112

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Jul 10, 2018
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The newer ups I have are fancy and they actually tell me how much power is being used as a number. The older one just has a row of 5 led that light up as you draw more power.

Does your UPS have anyway to guess how much power the equipment is using. It would be the total of everything plugged into the UPS.

The kilowatt device kanewolf linked is very nice for this. It has other uses for looking at things like if the wall or maybe even the UPS is putting out the correct voltages.

Note a UPS does not seem to always protect you from thunderstorms. I have pretty much every device I own on one of many UPS... I collected a few from when I used to live where the power went off all the time. In addition I have surge protection strips on many of these both in front of and behind the UPS.

I had a lighting strike somewhere close but it did not hit the house. I had all kinds of stuff get destroyed all over the house on different ups and circuits. Stuff like outside security cameras that were powered from on a switch that still works and in other cases it burn out ethernet ports in pc or even the onboard video on one. Lots of power blocks destroyed. All the UPS themselves are perfectly fine. From what I can tell they did not even click over a bunch of equipment just turned off because it was damaged.
My UPS has three lights: a green one to tell me that it's on, a orange one to tell me if the battery is charged and a red one to tell me if the battery is in use. When it comes to thunderstorms I'm pretty careful the first rumble of thunder or flash of lightning that I see/hear I switch my pc off and UPS off then I unplug them from the wall it's the same thing with power cuts the second the power goes out I'm under my desk asap and unpluging my pc and ups from the wall
 

bob112

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So with this meter do I just plug it into the wall then plug my UPS into the meter, get my UPS to tell me that I'm using to much power then read the numbers on the meter and then look for a UPS that will be able to handle that amount of volts? For example if the meter says 700 volts at the time of my UPS beeping I look for a 700 or above volt UPS? Sorry if I'm not using the right terms this isn't really my area of expertise
 
Basically that is how you accomplish this.

It is a bit more tricky. First you need to see the maximum load your pc takes....likely when the ups beeps. I am not sure if that meter keeps track of say maximum power used. You would have to use the computer and watch the display to see the maximum.

Next it would be nice if UPS more clearly showed how many watts they use rather than the VA number. You have to dig a bit to see how many watts they run. Basically the more va the more watts.

This is a example of a very popular UPS. Note here the device produces real sinewave output which increases the cost.
https://www.amazon.co.uk/CyberPower-CP1300EPFCLCD-UK-1300VA-Outlets-compatible/dp/B01MUY9AXN

This one for example has a VA of 1300 but can only produce 780 watts
 

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