USB 64GB Storage total size??

amr4622

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Jan 28, 2014
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I have a usb of 64 GB and I want to know why it says in my pc that space it have to store is 59.3 from a usb that says 64gb that it announces it self 64gb?? What Im missing? Those 4 GB hope it still there if not im so pissed off!!
 

Phillip Corcoran

Titan
Moderator
You haven't "lost" any storage space. When you buy a storage device (hard drive, pen drive etc) you don't actually get the storage space that's printed on the packaging on account of the difference between how the manufacturer calculates capacity (decimal-based) compared to how a computer calculates it (binary-based).

59.3 GB true capacity for a drive sold as 64 GB is correct.

The drive manufacturer's will not use the true binary capacity on their packaging because none of them wants to be the first to start doing it, since it will make their drives look more expensive per magabyte than the competition.
 

Phillip Corcoran

Titan
Moderator
You haven't "lost" any storage space. When you buy a storage device (hard drive, pen drive etc) you don't actually get the storage space that's printed on the packaging on account of the difference between how the manufacturer calculates capacity (decimal-based) compared to how a computer calculates it (binary-based).

59.3 GB true capacity for a drive sold as 64 GB is correct.

The drive manufacturer's will not use the true binary capacity on their packaging because none of them wants to be the first to start doing it, since it will make their drives look more expensive per magabyte than the competition.
 

trekzone

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Mar 31, 2014
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Basically, that's normal since storage media manufacturers considers 1GB = 1,000,000,000 bytes. But digitally your computer system counts 1GB = 1,073,741,824 bytes. Thus, your system reports 59.6 GB +/- instead of 64.0GB.
 

ShadeTreeTech

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Jun 23, 2011
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Phillip is 100% correct. Manufacturers consider 1 kilobyte = 1000 bytes, 1 megabyte = 1000 kilobytes, and 1 gigabyte = 1000 megabytes. However, the computer uses binary, which means the computer considers 1kilobyte = 1024 bytes, 1 megabytes = 1024 kilobytes, and 1 gigabyte = 1024 megabytes. This difference between the two is where the space is "lost", it actually isn't lost, it was never there to begin with. Each "step" up in naming you lose 2.4% of space (the difference % between 1000 and 1024). So you can do the math.... multiply your original 64GBs by .976 (1.000 - .024), where 1.000 = the whole part.
The "loss" at kilo is 64 * .976 = 62.464.
The "loss" at mega is 62.464 * .976 = 60.964864.
The "loss" at giga is 60.964864 * .976 = 59.5~.

Remember that a very small amount is reserved for the file allocation table, and other overhead for maintaining the file system on the drive itself (recycle bin, volume info, etc...)

Just for the record, the HDD manufacturers were sued over this about 10 years ago when they started this practice. The manufacturers won.
 

amr4622

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Jan 28, 2014
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(Sorry for my english)
Thanks! Those bastard & assholes manufacturer. I think about that someone should sue them.
 

Rationale

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Mar 21, 2014
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I'm glad I don't know you in real life if you get so mad about 5GB.
 

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