Question Use network switch to power wifi extender on another floor

timg65

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Hey, everyone!

It's my understanding that I can use a network switch to improve wifi extender service, but I need to be clear exactly how it works and if I need a particular sort of network switch.

Right now I have a wifi-capable router in my office (main floor) and an extender (TP-Link AC750) approximately 20' away at the far end of the adjoining kitchen. This gives us decent wifi on the main floor.

What I want to do is get equally good wifi on the second floor without spending an arm and a leg. My understanding is that I can do this by wiring from the router to a network switch (comm cable will run through the ceiling and up into a wall on the second floor, where it will come out and plug into the network switch).

What happens next? Do I run a line between the switch and the WPS input on a wifi extender? If not, how does the signal get from the switch to the extender? Do I need a particular sort of network switch and/or wifi extender to achieve this?

EDIT: I'm now seeing something called an "access point," which I hadn't been familiar with. Is this required between the switch and the extender, does it do away with the need for a switch altogether, or.... ?

My apologies if this isn't the correct forum.
 
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Extender is a stupid marketing term that has many meaning. A AP is a device you attach via ethernet cable that provides wifi signals. The ethernet cable can be attached to either a router or a switch. The other device they common call a extender is a wifi repeater. This gets it signals from the main router via wireless and resends it out wireless and maybe even to devices connected to ethernet ports on the repeater.

Note to make thing even more confusing they have been using the word MESH which also means pretty much nothing since the network already is all connected it just another term for a slightly different form of repeater.

In any case you never want to use any form of repeater if you have another options. Ethernet connected AP is the golden solution for extending wifi. Large enterprise installation who pretty much have unlimited money do not use silly mesh or repeater systems. These are only being sold to home users.

Many so called "extenders" can run as AP only. You can also use pretty much any router as a AP, many have a special option but pretty much any router can be used as a AP.

I actually though from the title of your question is you were asking about providing electical power to a remote AP. This is a feature that a actual AP has. Many can use "power over ethernet" and get the power from a special port on a switch. This is done when you want to say ceiling mount your wireless in the remote room and there is no power outlet. It also lets you put a UPS on a single switch and run multiple AP. That way if you lose power your wifi signal does not drop in the remote rooms and you don't have to install UPS everywhere.
 
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timg65

Distinguished
Nov 17, 2012
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Extender is a stupid marketing term that has many meaning. A AP is a device you attach via ethernet cable that provides wifi signals. The ethernet cable can be attached to either a router or a switch. The other device they common call a extender is a wifi repeater. This gets it signals from the main router via wireless and resends it out wireless and maybe even to devices connected to ethernet ports on the repeater.

Note to make thing even more confusing they have been using the word MESH which also means pretty much nothing since the network already is all connected it just another term for a slightly different form of repeater.

In any case you never want to use any form of repeater if you have another options. Ethernet connected AP is the golden solution for extending wifi. Large enterprise installation who pretty much have unlimited money do not use silly mesh or repeater systems. These are only being sold to home users.

Many so called "extenders" can run as AP only. You can also use pretty much any router as a AP, many have a special option but pretty much any router can be used as a AP.

I actually though from the title of your question is you were asking about providing electical power to a remote AP. This is a feature that a actual AP has. Many can use "power over ethernet" and get the power from a special port on a switch. This is done when you want to say ceiling mount your wireless in the remote room and there is no power outlet. It also lets you put a UPS on a single switch and run multiple AP. That way if you lose power your wifi signal does not drop in the remote rooms and you don't have to install UPS everywhere.
Thanks, Bill!

So something like the TP-Link Omada AC1350 should accomplish what I want, just by connecting it to my router?
 

timg65

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Sweet! So I can just run a connector (I'll probably use Cat 8 just for forward compatibility) from the router to the AC1350, and I should be all set.

I'm surprised (and thankful!) that this is actually a pretty affordable setup. I may end up doing the same thing downstairs at some point, and do away with the "extender" altogether. (Probably next time it craters. Previous one lasted a couple years.)
 
I don't know if there is anything offical that is cat8. Last time I looked they had not even decided if it was going to be 40gbit or 100gbit.
Your best option if you really want future is buy normal cat6a cable. Any form of shielded cable need fancy installation that only really works in data centers and is not needed anyway in a home.

Cat6a will run to 10gbit.

Be very sure to avoid fake cable. A lot of so called "cat8" cable is fake. The word "cat" does not have any offical meaning the ethernet standards are actually things like EIA/TIA and a couple others. It is even more important when you plan to use PoE power over it.

The cable must be pure copper (no cca) it also must have wire size 22-24 (no flat or thin cables). There is massive amounts of fake cable on places like amazon and ebay.
 

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