[SOLVED] Using a WAN router when my wall socket only gives coaxial?

Jul 19, 2020
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So, right now I have some kind of coaxial cable coming out of my wall socket and connected to my router. I'm interested in getting a new router like this one but it only has a WAN port. How would I be able to connect it (ideally cheaply)?
 

gggplaya

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Honestly, you should probably pose this question to Igor's lab in Germany. Tomshardware was purchased and split a long time ago. The U.S. run tomshardware is separate from Tomshardware germany. Totally different management, reviews and articles. More recently, Tomshardware Germany renamed itself to Igor's lab. I say this because you'll be able to get better specific modem recommendations that work with your cable company in Germany.
https://www.igorslab.de/community/#international-corner.73

Don't worry about Moca, not necessary for what you're doing.
 
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Jul 19, 2020
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MOCA device.

Though it will be cheaper+better if you could just run new cables through your wall. It's quite easy actually.
I live in an apartment so I won't be able to make changes like that. All the MOCA devices seem exorbitantly expensive, are there any cheaper options? For instance could I get a modem as well? Would that cause issues with my ISP?
 
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I live in an apartment so I won't be able to make changes like that. All the MOCA devices seem exorbitantly expensive, are there any cheaper options? For instance could I get a modem as well? Would that cause issues with my ISP?
If your ISP provides you coaxial, yes.
You can change the cables in an apartment as well, I did so.
You pull off the face plate for the coax, tape the ethernet to it really well, and pull from the other side, it's quite easy actually.
 

Ralston18

Titan
Moderator
Problem being that sometimes the original cabling is stapled down or otherwise secured in place.

Or simply will refuse to be pulled back around some corner of other obstacle.

Does not take much to cause a cable pull to hang up somewhere.

You could also "take out" other cables and wires that may have (likely improperly) have been co-run alongside the coax.

And is it not uncommon to discover piping (water, sewer) in the wall along with firewalls or duct work.

Be very aware that you will likely be held accountable for any damage that occurs.

And in some places DIY installs (to some extent or another) may be prohibited by code and thus illegal.

Take a close look at the current path(s).

Going straight through a wall from one side to the other is generally easily done. Beyond that , unless you have full access to the total run, it gets much riskier.

Just a note of caution for the record.
 

Wacabletech06

Prominent
Jul 4, 2019
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So, right now I have some kind of coaxial cable coming out of my wall socket and connected to my router. I'm interested in getting a new router like this one but it only has a WAN port. How would I be able to connect it (ideally cheaply)?
Does your internet come from a cable company? If so its a gateway which is a cable modem and router in one. You will need to confer with them about what devices they support but you can either buy a gateway device to replace it or a modem and seperrate or side car router to replace it.

If not, then you are likely using a moca device some how and more info on what you are doing and how your house snetwork is setup will likely be needed to make good suggestions.
 
If your current router is hooked to the coax cable it means it has some form of modem in it.

It all depends on the details of what room you want things in and where the coax runs. You should be able to buy a modem and then hook it to your new router.
 

gggplaya

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I feel like everyone is overcomplicating this? As bill said, I think the OP is referring to the router supplied by the cable company.

In this case, all you have to do is put the cable company supplied router in "BRIDGED MODE" and you can then use it as just a modem, which you can then connect to the WAN port of your new router.

If you don't want to pay the rental fees from the cable company. You can do what I did and buy your own cable modem which is approved by the cable company (FCC laws require that they have some approved to purchase) and then buy your own router.

If you tell us which cable company, Comcast, Spectrum, Cox or other, we can make recommendations on what equipment to buy. With most cable companies charging $10-$15/mo for rental fees, whatever you buy will eventually pay for itself in 1-2 years. But you also have the possibility to buy better equipment with better QOS traffic management.
 
Reactions: Fukastu
Jul 19, 2020
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I feel like everyone is overcomplicating this? As bill said, I think the OP is referring to the router supplied by the cable company.

In this case, all you have to do is put the cable company supplied router in "BRIDGED MODE" and you can then use it as just a modem, which you can then connect to the WAN port of your new router.
I am indeed. Will using Bridged Mode cause a bottleneck (at least, any meaningful one for standard home use)?

If you tell us which cable company, Comcast, Spectrum, Cox or other, we can make recommendations on what equipment to buy.
I live in Germany and use a Horizon box at present, originally supplied by Unitymedia which has since been purchased by Vodafone. I think, in the US, Virgin offers a similar product.
 

gggplaya

Distinguished
Honestly, you should probably pose this question to Igor's lab in Germany. Tomshardware was purchased and split a long time ago. The U.S. run tomshardware is separate from Tomshardware germany. Totally different management, reviews and articles. More recently, Tomshardware Germany renamed itself to Igor's lab. I say this because you'll be able to get better specific modem recommendations that work with your cable company in Germany.
https://www.igorslab.de/community/#international-corner.73

Don't worry about Moca, not necessary for what you're doing.
 
Reactions: Fukastu and SamirD
Yep, I'd recommend posting on Igor's lab as that is more centric to your part of the world, but it does sound like you have an isp supplied modem/router combination. Usually replacing this isn't necessary unless you're trying to solve a specific problem.
 

gggplaya

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Yep, I'd recommend posting on Igor's lab as that is more centric to your part of the world, but it does sound like you have an isp supplied modem/router combination. Usually replacing this isn't necessary unless you're trying to solve a specific problem.
From a technical standpoint, you're right. But some ISP's charge you a rental fee and if you're going to use it in Bridge Mode, you might as well buy your own cable modem to avoid the rental fee.
 
Jul 19, 2020
6
1
15
0
Honestly, you should probably pose this question to Igor's lab in Germany. Tomshardware was purchased and split a long time ago. The U.S. run tomshardware is separate from Tomshardware germany. Totally different management, reviews and articles. More recently, Tomshardware Germany renamed itself to Igor's lab. I say this because you'll be able to get better specific modem recommendations that work with your cable company in Germany.
https://www.igorslab.de/community/#international-corner.73

Don't worry about Moca, not necessary for what you're doing.
Got it. Posting there now, thanks for the help :)
 
Reactions: gggplaya
From a technical standpoint, you're right. But some ISP's charge you a rental fee and if you're going to use it in Bridge Mode, you might as well buy your own cable modem to avoid the rental fee.
Sometimes it's worth the fee--especially if your isp regularly has problems. It's nice to be able to avoid the 'we're not responsible for your modem' excuse and finger point to them and say 'it's your modem, so it's your problem--fix it'. I've run into this with various isps over the years.

And it depends on the problem the OP is trying to solve with the tplink--better wireless coverage is my guess, and you don't need to install a router to do that--just put it in ap mode and put it where it can do service and get on with life. ;)
 

gggplaya

Distinguished
Sometimes it's worth the fee--especially if your isp regularly has problems. It's nice to be able to avoid the 'we're not responsible for your modem' excuse and finger point to them and say 'it's your modem, so it's your problem--fix it'. I've run into this with various isps over the years.

And it depends on the problem the OP is trying to solve with the tplink--better wireless coverage is my guess, and you don't need to install a router to do that--just put it in ap mode and put it where it can do service and get on with life. ;)
I totally hear you, in fact I recommend for old people and the totally non-tech savvy people to use the ISP provided wifi/modem. If it doesn't work, you call them up and they'll get you a replacement or try to solve the issue over the phone.

But for Comcast, the fee shot up from $8/mo to $10, and now it's like $13 a month. That's $168/year for that kind of tech support insurance. My parents were looking to drop their cable bill as much as they could, so for their house I bought them a modem for $40 and a $50 Tmobile rebranded Asus AC68u router and loaded it with merlin. It's a much better experience, wifi is a little better than the Xfinity one they had before and they're saving $13/mo. If they didn't have me for a son, I'd recommend they continue to use the Xfinity equipment because they struggle with technology.
 
I totally hear you, in fact I recommend for old people and the totally non-tech savvy people to use the ISP provided wifi/modem. If it doesn't work, you call them up and they'll get you a replacement or try to solve the issue over the phone.

But for Comcast, the fee shot up from $8/mo to $10, and now it's like $13 a month. That's $168/year for that kind of tech support insurance. My parents were looking to drop their cable bill as much as they could, so for their house I bought them a modem for $40 and a $50 Tmobile rebranded Asus AC68u router and loaded it with merlin. It's a much better experience, wifi is a little better than the Xfinity one they had before and they're saving $13/mo. If they didn't have me for a son, I'd recommend they continue to use the Xfinity equipment because they struggle with technology.
Yeah, the ISPs have caught wind of this and are definitely cranking up the fees. Still, several isps still don't charge (like spectrum and at&t), so then it's just making a problem that doesn't exist otherwise.
 

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