Question Using an ethernet splitter for a WAN port

May 13, 2019
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Hi, i recently got a new connection which has a HFC termination device with a single WAN port that needs to go to my ISP router.
The termination device is in a room with a single Ethernet port wall plate which connects where my ISP router is where i also have a bunch of other devices connected.

Problem is, the room with the termination device also has a set top box (pay tv) which needs ethernet. I've tried using a splitter on both ends and connecting the LAN and WAN ports but it doesn't work.
Even when using the splitter and using only the WAN to WAN connection, it shows no connectively. I'm assuming the WAN port needs more than the standard 4 pins??

I can't fit the ISP router in the same spot so i can't see any other options?

Any thoughts would be greatly appreciated
thanks
 

bill001g

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Aug 9, 2012
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Even if you were to get it to work you will only have 100mbps connections. All the splitters do is in effect create 2 2 pair cables rather than 1 four pair cable. The other problem is when you use these cable splitters is the function called automdix does not work well. You get the old problem of crossover cables back again.

If your equipment needs gigabit you need all 4 pairs.

So I will assume the connection between your modem device and your router is standard ethernet. What you can do instead of use physical splitters to do this is do it logically with vlans. You will need 2 fairly inexpensive "manged" switches. You need nothing fancy just ones that support vlans. You would say assign port 1 to vlan 1 and port 2 to vlan 2 on both switch. Then say on port 8 you would assign both vlan 1 and vlan 2 with tags. So the traffic comes in port 1 gets a tag put on it gets sent across port 8 the remote switch removes the tag and send the traffic to port 1. You can actually put as many ports on each vlan as you want and have many more than 2 vlans if there was some need.

You in effect have 2 cables. Now you will be limited to 1gbit total so if you actually have gigabit internet you will only get 500mbps since the bandwidth is split. It will likely be a bit smaller because switches do not split the traffic evenly. Still much better than using physical splitters and getting only 100mbps
 
May 13, 2019
2
0
10
Best answers
0
Even if you were to get it to work you will only have 100mbps connections. All the splitters do is in effect create 2 2 pair cables rather than 1 four pair cable. The other problem is when you use these cable splitters is the function called automdix does not work well. You get the old problem of crossover cables back again.

If your equipment needs gigabit you need all 4 pairs.

So I will assume the connection between your modem device and your router is standard ethernet. What you can do instead of use physical splitters to do this is do it logically with vlans. You will need 2 fairly inexpensive "manged" switches. You need nothing fancy just ones that support vlans. You would say assign port 1 to vlan 1 and port 2 to vlan 2 on both switch. Then say on port 8 you would assign both vlan 1 and vlan 2 with tags. So the traffic comes in port 1 gets a tag put on it gets sent across port 8 the remote switch removes the tag and send the traffic to port 1. You can actually put as many ports on each vlan as you want and have many more than 2 vlans if there was some need.

You in effect have 2 cables. Now you will be limited to 1gbit total so if you actually have gigabit internet you will only get 500mbps since the bandwidth is split. It will likely be a bit smaller because switches do not split the traffic evenly. Still much better than using physical splitters and getting only 100mbps
Thanks - i'll give that a try. Alternatviely, could i use a spare wifi router to jin the wifi network and work as an accesspoint and connect the spare router WAN port to set top box? Or does an access point only extend the wifi range and doesn't use the WAN or LAN ports of the router?
 

bill001g

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Aug 9, 2012
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So you mean you want to run the cable to the router in the other room. Then you want to connect the set top box via wifi to that router. You need what is called a client-bridge. This is in effect a wifi nic card that attaches to your computer via ethernet than say USB. They used to sell these units for tv or game consoles years ago when you only got ethernet. Now days these are called generically "extenders" and do more functions but commonly are used for wifi repeaters but they can also be used a client-bridge.

A AP is the reverse of what you need. It allows end machines (ie clients) to connect to the network. It runs as a "server" just like a router so the 2 can no connect. Some routers you can load third party firmware to get the client-bridge/repeater function. Some small number of routers have that ablity on factory software but it is not common. It is very common to have bridge/AP mode but as mentioned that is the reverse of what you need.

Now what you could do it place your main router in the room with modem. Then use the ethernet cable to connect the second router in the remote room as a AP. All depends why you want the router in the remote room. A AP is best though of a extra radios for your router that are connected via ethernet.
 

digitalgriffin

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Jan 29, 2008
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Hi, i recently got a new connection which has a HFC termination device with a single WAN port that needs to go to my ISP router.
The termination device is in a room with a single Ethernet port wall plate which connects where my ISP router is where i also have a bunch of other devices connected.

Problem is, the room with the termination device also has a set top box (pay tv) which needs ethernet. I've tried using a splitter on both ends and connecting the LAN and WAN ports but it doesn't work.
Even when using the splitter and using only the WAN to WAN connection, it shows no connectively. I'm assuming the WAN port needs more than the standard 4 pins??

I can't fit the ISP router in the same spot so i can't see any other options?

Any thoughts would be greatly appreciated
thanks
This is one reason i hate bundled boxes isps provide you. They like them because it keeps you yrapped in a closed system that gives them additional revenue streams through box rental fees. Plus theres less tech support issues trying to diagnose brand x y z you have attached to your network. But what they give you is utter junk.

You cant have your own router. Your box isp is a combination router already. There should be at least one lan port on the back of it. Youll need to buy a range extender like a netgear ex7000 or a regular access point with additionnal lan ports.

For a better recommendation please provide model of router combo box the isp gave to you.
 

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