Using both display port and HDMI to get a 4k 60hz signal further

stephengurnavage

Prominent
Oct 31, 2017
5
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510
Hello everyone. I have recently gotten an LG 60 inch 4K HDR TV that is capable of a 60hz refresh rate. My gaming desktop is capable of outputting certain games in 4K reasonably well however it is quite far from where the TV is. I had a 25 foot HDMI cable ran to the TV already for the previous one, but noticed I could not get above 29/30fps for some reason. Its come to my attention that HDMI is not capable of sending a 4K 60hz signal more than 8-15 feet (depending where I read) and the signal drops to 30hz instead. I know that display port is capable of sending the signal that I want over a distance of 50 feet so my question is this.

If I were to run a display port cable to the back of the TV and then use a display port to HDMI converter, would I get the 4K 60hz signal? I do not see a reason why I wouldn't but I have never tried hooking up an adapter to a TV like that nor do I know how that signal conversion works. For all I know a signal as high quality as that can't be converted quickly on the fly like that.

For anyone curious for some reason, the TV is an LG 60UJ7700.
My computer specs:
i7-7700k (stock)
GTX 980 ti 6GB (factory OC)
24GB DDR4
Mix of SSDs and HDDs

 
Solution
[quotemsg=20897539,0,2583355][quotemsg=20896976,0,2056365]HDMI has no defined distance limit. Just get a Premium certified High Speed HDMI cable, which means it has been certified to work at up to 18 Gbit/s.[/quotemsg]

Why does every site say 4k has a distance of ~10 feet and 1080p degrades after 50 feet then? I see a lot of people respond to similar questions about HDMI that the cables don't matter but am unsure why so many say it does as well.

If we were to PRETEND that HDMI had a set distance, just for funsies, would my proposed idea with the display port adapter work to send and display a 4k signal?[/quotemsg]

They're probably just generalizing.

It just depends on how distorted the signal gets, which depends on the physical properties of the cable. The cable does matter, which is why some...

stephengurnavage

Prominent
Oct 31, 2017
5
0
510
[quotemsg=20896976,0,2056365]HDMI has no defined distance limit. Just get a Premium certified High Speed HDMI cable, which means it has been certified to work at up to 18 Gbit/s.[/quotemsg]

Why does every site say 4k has a distance of ~10 feet and 1080p degrades after 50 feet then? I see a lot of people respond to similar questions about HDMI that the cables don't matter but am unsure why so many say it does as well.

If we were to PRETEND that HDMI had a set distance, just for funsies, would my proposed idea with the display port adapter work to send and display a 4k signal?
 
[quotemsg=20897539,0,2583355][quotemsg=20896976,0,2056365]HDMI has no defined distance limit. Just get a Premium certified High Speed HDMI cable, which means it has been certified to work at up to 18 Gbit/s.[/quotemsg]

Why does every site say 4k has a distance of ~10 feet and 1080p degrades after 50 feet then? I see a lot of people respond to similar questions about HDMI that the cables don't matter but am unsure why so many say it does as well.

If we were to PRETEND that HDMI had a set distance, just for funsies, would my proposed idea with the display port adapter work to send and display a 4k signal?[/quotemsg]

They're probably just generalizing.

It just depends on how distorted the signal gets, which depends on the physical properties of the cable. The cable does matter, which is why some 15 foot cables don't work, and others do. To avoid any confusion the HDMI creators offer certifications for cables that can handle certain levels of bandwidth. Premium High Speed HDMI cables have been tested at the bandwidth required for 4K 60 Hz.

I doubt a DisplayPort adapter would work, DP tends to far worse than HDMI at long distances. People have trouble finding DP cables more than 10-15 feet that can handle full DP 1.2 bandwidth (4K 60 Hz / 1440p 144 Hz).
 
Solution