• Now's your chance win big! Join our community and get entered to win a RTX 2060 GPU, plus more! Join here.

    Pi Cast Episode 3 streams live on Tuesday, August 4th at 2:30 pm ET (7:30 PM BST). Watch live right here!

    Catch Scharon on the Tom's Hardware Show live on Thursday, August 6th at 2:00 pm ET (7:00 PM BST). Click here!

Question Using PCIe RAID Controllers without a Motherboard?

Jun 6, 2020
5
0
10
0
Because of the costs and flexibility. I would like a rack solution with two 4x 2.5" backplanes each with their own raid and their own 10 Gbs USB adapter. For the Data a RAID0 and for the Backup a RAID5.

So is it possible to use a PCIe RAID Controller without a Motherboard? The non PCIe Hardware RAIDs a pretty expensive.

p.s.: the DATA with SATAIII SSDs and the Backup with HDDs
 

USAFRet

Titan
Moderator
Mar 16, 2013
126,051
4,409
159,940
19,752
Because of the costs and flexibility. I would like a rack solution with two 4x 2.5" backplanes each with their own raid and their own 10 Gbs USB adapter. For the Data a RAID0 and for the Backup a RAID5.

So is it possible to use a PCIe RAID Controller without a Motherboard? The non PCIe Hardware RAIDs a pretty expensive.

p.s.: the DATA with SATAIII SSDs and the Backup with HDDs
That particular device would not seem to support what you want to do.
"Support Equipment:1*NVMe SSD"

And "PCIe" requires a connection to....something. Not just the drives.

If you're going to do this, do it right. And yes, hat costs actual money.
 
Jun 6, 2020
5
0
10
0
That particular device would not seem to support what you want to do.
"Support Equipment:1*NVMe SSD"

And "PCIe" requires a connection to....something. Not just the drives.

If you're going to do this, do it right. And yes, hat costs actual money.
The particular device has a SFF-8643 Connector which can be used with such connectors https://cs-electronics.com/product/internal-hd-mini-sas-sff-8643-to-sff-8482/

And yes, the topic question is asking for that "something" that you can connect to a PCIe.
Please explain what is the right way? Do I have to build a hole PC to get access to the PCIe lanes?

PCIe RAID cards like this one are pretty cheap: https://www.delock.com/produkt/89395/merkmale.html
 
The whole idea about RAID (or any other storage device) is to provide for storage services over some medium. So, how do you plan to connect to your RAID array - Ethernet, USB, SCSI, SATA? This will determine what kind of "interface" you need between the drives, and "users".
 
Jun 6, 2020
5
0
10
0
The whole idea about RAID (or any other storage device) is to provide for storage services over some medium. So, how do you plan to connect to your RAID array - Ethernet, USB, SCSI, SATA? This will determine what kind of "interface" you need between the drives, and "users".
The adapter that I already linked answers the "interface" question: USB.
I would like to connect a hardware RAID between the drives and the USB adapter. Since most hardware RAID controllers are PCIe designed I'm asking if there is a possibility in general to use an PCIe without a motherboard like I put the card into a "riser x" and get the data stream into another format like USB for example?

Drives >Raid controller> 10Gbs USB.

Sorry, I have some technical understanding but I'm unexperienced and don't know the possibilities.
As I understand the classic connection path would be

Drives > PCIe RAID controller > Motherboard > Operating System. Does it have to be that way?

I would skip the PCIe RAID controllers if there is another option for a hardware RAID but I only found one with SATAII connections and it would limit the transfer rate since SATAII only provides 3 Gbs.
 
If I understand you correctly:
  • you want (or need) 10Gbps interface to storage;
  • you are looking for a "box" with USB interface and RAID capabilities.
The commercial storage boxes (commonly called "NAS") provide for just that, and
Drives > PCIe RAID controller > Motherboard > Operating System. Does it have to be that way?
they do it that way, one way or another (even that SATA port multiplier you've listed).

So - you can either build your own (if you want 10Gbps USB interface, which is just a marketing figure)), or go "commercial" way by getting an off-the-shelf NAS.
 
Jun 6, 2020
5
0
10
0
Problem are the available sizes. If they have the speed they are to big, if they have the right size they are to slow.
But thanks for the suggestion
 

ASK THE COMMUNITY

TRENDING THREADS