Question Using TP-Link with ATT Arris Modem/Router

Oct 21, 2021
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I have the following:

  1. An Arris (BGW210) Modem/Router Gateway from AT&T.
  2. One AT&T WPS Bridge (VAP2500)
  3. One TP-Link Archer C9 (C1900) router.
I am ditching their cable TV services and the AT&T WPS Bridge will go away leaving me with the modem and the TP-Link router. I want to use my TP-Link router for my wi-fi access.

After searching and searching, I am confused by some of the articles I've been reading many of which are several years old. One talks about detaching the gateway from the AT&T modem before powering off. Some say just run a line from one of the modem's ethernet ports to the router's LAN/WAN port?

As an old guy, I am a little bit confused and AT&T support just made it even more confusing after talking to them today.

Does anyone have excellent instructions for a dummy like me that are specifically for the products I am using? I really want to do it the right way. Playing around and guess at this is not my cup of tea.

Thank you.
 
The device you call a modem from att is actually a router. I will assume you have BGW210-700 which is the newer version of this router.

Unless you have some strange wifi issue you should be able to just use the arris and not even use the tplink.

But if you really want to use the tplink you can just hook the WAN port of the tplink to any lan port on the arris.

You do not have to power cycle the arris if you do not want to, it won't hurt if you do reboot it.

The one confusing thing you are going to have to fix is LAN ip on the tplink. Both routers are using 192.168.1.x for network addresses. Change the lan ip on the tplink to use 192.168.2.1

BUT since you want it simple why don't you just use the ATT router. Your tplink is not going to be much different. There might be some software feature the tplink has that the arris does not but I suspect this is not the case when you are asking for simple instructions.
 
Oct 21, 2021
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Thank you for responding. I could not find where the Arris is a BGW210-700 model.

The purpose is location. The modem is located about 50 feet to the another computer that is getting poor Wi-Fi signal. I know my TP-Link has a much better range and thought maybe this will improve the signal to that computer and a few other devices.

The information you've provided is very helpful. So, if I set it according to your instruction, is the IP address you suggested will work or does AT&T need to provide that info to me?

Anything else I need to look out for or do?

Thank you.
 
You can just use that IP on the tplink router. These are all private IP you could use 10.1.1.1 and a bunch of other ones I just used that one because it is more common.

Your other options is to use the tplink as a AP. This would then just use the wifi part of the tplink and use the router function on the att box.

You can likely plug to the wan port of the tplink and set it to run in AP mode. I think you do not have to change the IP. The arris uses 192.168.1.254 and the the tplink uses 192.168.1.1 so they should work that way when running in AP mode.
 
So I was trying to not get things side tracked by talking about the 2 ways to get a AP.

The example you link will work on any router.
As you see the steps are
  1. Change the IP to not conflict with the main router. The arris and the tplink you have uses 192.168.1.x unlike the example the uses 192.168.0.x. Just one of those details that can confuse people.
  2. Disable the DHCP function.
  3. Plug a cable between the LAN port of both your main router and the remote AP.
The other method requires the device to have a AP mode but many do.
The steps there are
  1. change the IP to not conflict
  2. turn on the AP function. This will disable the DHCP for you. It also disables a couple other things that generally don't cause issues but it is better if they are off when you run AP mode.
  3. Use the WAN port on the remote device and plug it into the main router lan.
In some ways the second way is easier and it gives you a extra lan port.

Now even 1 less step way is to run the tplink as a router...ie its default setting.
In this cases you must change the lan subnet to a different network. Ie instead of changing 192.168.1.x to 192.168.1.y you change 192.168.1.x to 192.168.2.x
You then use the wan port like normal.
The only issue with doing this is you now have 2 networks so something connected directly to the arris would have issue sharing files with something connected to the tplink.

BUT in the end choose whichever you feel is easier for you.
 
Oct 21, 2021
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You have been a great help.

After all that, I decided to test my router by simply powering it up without anything else connected. It seems that my DC power adapter is not working. When I first powered it on, only the USB led lit up but only for about 5 seconds. Nothing else lit up. Not even the power button led. So I am awaiting for a friend to lend me his voltage meter to check the output. My guess is is that it's not putting out enough voltage.

Well, it will have to wait a few more days before I can do anything but rest assure you effort is not in vain. I think I have learned a lot more from you than just reading stuff online.

UPDATE: Just got the meter and tested the DC power adapter. Although it outputs 12 volts which is correct, the meter did not register the amps which is supposed to be 3300mA. I'm getting zero

Thank you again.
 
Oct 21, 2021
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Got a new DC power adapter and I still have the same power issue. I believe it's kaput. So I think I am going to go with a Wi-Fi extender to plugin into an outlet. If you have any suggestion as to which ones are very good and yet affordable, I would appreciate. Otherwise, thank you for taking time out and answering my questions in great details.
 
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