VHS to DVD succesfull but distortion at lower edge, howto ..

Rick

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I have been able to convert VHS tapes to DVD, however during playback i
noticed some distortions at the lower edge. The distortion looks like a
flickering light. It happend when recording from VHS to MPG not from MPG
to Video DVD. Anyone has encounterd the same ? Can it be removed ?
The original VHS tape does not have this distortion.


Rik
 
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Rick wrote:

> I have been able to convert VHS tapes to DVD, however during playback i
> noticed some distortions at the lower edge. The distortion looks like a
> flickering light. It happend when recording from VHS to MPG not from MPG
> to Video DVD. Anyone has encounterd the same ? Can it be removed ?
> The original VHS tape does not have this distortion.

All VHS tapes have this, AFAIK. But you don't see it due to a TV's
overscan.
http://www.videohelp.com/forum/archive/t212916.html


-WD
 
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"Will Dormann" <wdormann@yahoo.com.invalid> wrote in message
news:rhmjc.376$ZD3.309@fe1.columbus.rr.com...
> Rick wrote:
>
> > I have been able to convert VHS tapes to DVD, however during playback i
> > noticed some distortions at the lower edge. The distortion looks like a
> > flickering light. It happend when recording from VHS to MPG not from MPG
> > to Video DVD. Anyone has encounterd the same ? Can it be removed ?
> > The original VHS tape does not have this distortion.
>
> All VHS tapes have this, AFAIK. But you don't see it due to a TV's
> overscan.
> http://www.videohelp.com/forum/archive/t212916.html

Yes - to get rid, Rick could try masking off the bottom few lines
in his video editor.
HTH
--
Rob
 

Alan

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You see this on your computer monitor, but when you burn and play the
DVD to a TV, you will not see it because of the overscan mentioned
above, so don't worry about it.

"Rob Hemmings" <SpamDaMan@nowhere.noway.con> wrote in message news:<c6lvcf$qtf$1@south.jnrs.ja.net>...
> "Will Dormann" <wdormann@yahoo.com.invalid> wrote in message
> news:rhmjc.376$ZD3.309@fe1.columbus.rr.com...
> > Rick wrote:
> >
> > > I have been able to convert VHS tapes to DVD, however during playback i
> > > noticed some distortions at the lower edge. The distortion looks like a
> > > flickering light. It happend when recording from VHS to MPG not from MPG
> > > to Video DVD. Anyone has encounterd the same ? Can it be removed ?
> > > The original VHS tape does not have this distortion.
> >
> > All VHS tapes have this, AFAIK. But you don't see it due to a TV's
> > overscan.
> > http://www.videohelp.com/forum/archive/t212916.html
>
> Yes - to get rid, Rick could try masking off the bottom few lines
> in his video editor.
> HTH
 
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In article <c6lvcf$qtf$1@south.jnrs.ja.net>,
SpamDaMan@nowhere.noway.con says...
>
> "Will Dormann" <wdormann@yahoo.com.invalid> wrote in message
> news:rhmjc.376$ZD3.309@fe1.columbus.rr.com...
> > Rick wrote:
> >
> > > I have been able to convert VHS tapes to DVD, however during playback i
> > > noticed some distortions at the lower edge. The distortion looks like a
> > > flickering light. It happend when recording from VHS to MPG not from MPG
> > > to Video DVD. Anyone has encounterd the same ? Can it be removed ?
> > > The original VHS tape does not have this distortion.
> >
> > All VHS tapes have this, AFAIK. But you don't see it due to a TV's
> > overscan.
> > http://www.videohelp.com/forum/archive/t212916.html
>
> Yes - to get rid, Rick could try masking off the bottom few lines
> in his video editor.
> HTH
>

That's pretty much what I do in VirtualDub during the
filtering stage. Add a resize filter, edit the crop
settings to remove the 4 or 8 lines from the top/bottom,
then change the resize settings to letterbox the image
back to the original size. End result is a centered
image with thin black bars at the top/bottom and no
scaling issues.
 
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Toshi1873 wrote:

>> Rick could try masking off the bottom few lines in his
>> video editor.

> That's pretty much what I do in VirtualDub during the
> filtering stage. Add a resize filter, edit the crop
> settings to remove the 4 or 8 lines from the top/bottom,
> then change the resize settings to letterbox the image
> back to the original size. End result is a centered
> image with thin black bars at the top/bottom and no
> scaling issues.

If you capture full-height, interlaced material, you need
to be careful about this approach in order not to screw up
the field order. (Numbers that are divisible by 4 are good
and safe even if you do the recentering trick, all others
may cause unexpected results on interlaced displays.)

Then again, do you really _want_ to move the original
center point of the image? The original tv images were
probably composed with the expectation that the center
point stays where it was when the production was
originally made.

--
znark
 

Rick

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"Jukka Aho" <jukka.aho@iki.fi> wrote in message news:FNVjc.832$6q5.455@reader1.news.jippii.net...
> Toshi1873 wrote:
>
> >> Rick could try masking off the bottom few lines in his
> >> video editor.
>
> > That's pretty much what I do in VirtualDub during the
> > filtering stage. Add a resize filter, edit the crop
> > settings to remove the 4 or 8 lines from the top/bottom,
> > then change the resize settings to letterbox the image
> > back to the original size. End result is a centered
> > image with thin black bars at the top/bottom and no
> > scaling issues.
>
> If you capture full-height, interlaced material, you need
> to be careful about this approach in order not to screw up
> the field order. (Numbers that are divisible by 4 are good
> and safe even if you do the recentering trick, all others
> may cause unexpected results on interlaced displays.)
>
> Then again, do you really _want_ to move the original
> center point of the image? The original tv images were
> probably composed with the expectation that the center
> point stays where it was when the production was
> originally made.

Why not just replace the bottom lines with black? Would
a VirtualDub filter like BorderControl or RegionRemove
do the trick?

Rick (another Rick with the same problem)
 
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>Toshi1873 wrote:
>
>>> Rick could try masking off the bottom few lines in his
>>> video editor.
>
>> That's pretty much what I do in VirtualDub during the
>> filtering stage. Add a resize filter, edit the crop
>> settings to remove the 4 or 8 lines from the top/bottom,
>> then change the resize settings to letterbox the image
>> back to the original size. End result is a centered
>> image with thin black bars at the top/bottom and no
>> scaling issues.
>
>If you capture full-height, interlaced material, you need
>to be careful about this approach in order not to screw up
>the field order. (Numbers that are divisible by 4 are good
>and safe even if you do the recentering trick, all others
>may cause unexpected results on interlaced displays.)
>
>Then again, do you really _want_ to move the original
>center point of the image? The original tv images were
>probably composed with the expectation that the center
>point stays where it was when the production was
>originally made.
>
>--
>znark
>
>

Right. And in addition, it is kind of stupid to discard parts of the signal
that are designed to be invisible when displayed on a TV display ("overscan").
If your end-use is a computer monitor (which displays all lines of the original
video), then a different argument can be made. But for DVD/SVCD or anything
else to be displayed on a TV monitor...you're destroying useful information by
cropping the head switching noise.
webpa
 

Rick

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"WEBPA" <webpa@aol.com> wrote in message news:20040428183905.04086.00000619@mb-m12.aol.com...
> >Toshi1873 wrote:
> >
> >>> Rick could try masking off the bottom few lines in his
> >>> video editor.
> >
> >> That's pretty much what I do in VirtualDub during the
> >> filtering stage. Add a resize filter, edit the crop
> >> settings to remove the 4 or 8 lines from the top/bottom,
> >> then change the resize settings to letterbox the image
> >> back to the original size. End result is a centered
> >> image with thin black bars at the top/bottom and no
> >> scaling issues.
> >
> >If you capture full-height, interlaced material, you need
> >to be careful about this approach in order not to screw up
> >the field order. (Numbers that are divisible by 4 are good
> >and safe even if you do the recentering trick, all others
> >may cause unexpected results on interlaced displays.)
> >
> >Then again, do you really _want_ to move the original
> >center point of the image? The original tv images were
> >probably composed with the expectation that the center
> >point stays where it was when the production was
> >originally made.
> >
> >--
> >znark
> >
> >
>
> Right. And in addition, it is kind of stupid to discard parts of the signal
> that are designed to be invisible when displayed on a TV display ("overscan").
> If your end-use is a computer monitor (which displays all lines of the original
> video), then a different argument can be made. But for DVD/SVCD or anything
> else to be displayed on a TV monitor...you're destroying useful information by
> cropping the head switching noise.
> webpa

Webpa, what's the easiest/most straightforward way of discarding
this head switching noise, assuming end-use is for a computer
monitor? I have a bunch of MPEG-1 files I'd like to fix but I'm
getting a bit lost with all the different software, filters etc.

Thanks,
Rick
 
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In article <c6pbki$e1h62$1@ID-82690.news.uni-berlin.de>,
me@privacy.net says...
> "Jukka Aho" <jukka.aho@iki.fi> wrote in message news:FNVjc.832$6q5.455@reader1.news.jippii.net...
> > Toshi1873 wrote:
> >
> > >> Rick could try masking off the bottom few lines in his
> > >> video editor.
> >
> > > That's pretty much what I do in VirtualDub during the
> > > filtering stage. Add a resize filter, edit the crop
> > > settings to remove the 4 or 8 lines from the top/bottom,
> > > then change the resize settings to letterbox the image
> > > back to the original size. End result is a centered
> > > image with thin black bars at the top/bottom and no
> > > scaling issues.
> >
> > If you capture full-height, interlaced material, you need
> > to be careful about this approach in order not to screw up
> > the field order. (Numbers that are divisible by 4 are good
> > and safe even if you do the recentering trick, all others
> > may cause unexpected results on interlaced displays.)
> >
> > Then again, do you really _want_ to move the original
> > center point of the image? The original tv images were
> > probably composed with the expectation that the center
> > point stays where it was when the production was
> > originally made.
>
> Why not just replace the bottom lines with black? Would
> a VirtualDub filter like BorderControl or RegionRemove
> do the trick?
>

You can also use the "fill" filter, which is how I used
to do it.

When I do the resize, I turn on the interlaced checkbox
and also make sure to crop in multiples of 2 (2 from the
top, 6 from the bottom). I have yet to see any issues
with field-order, although I'll keep an eye out for it.

Moving the center point of the image down 2-3 pixels out
of 480 is not going to make a noticable difference.