Question Vibration insulated motherboard standoffs (and over vibration prevention mountings)

Meltdown19k

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Hello,

I'm working on building a small PC case that will fit inside a pelican 1510 case with some foam for travel. I've got the case and all my hardware figured out, but I'm looking for any additional things I can do to help insulate it from the vibrations and bumps of rolling the case around. I have support brackets for the GPU and cooling block, but I'm trying to find some sort of vibration dampening standoffs for the motherboard itself. The foam in the case is likely enough, but every little bit helps.

I'd also take suggestions for any sort of vibration resistance to incorporate into this, not just standoffs. I haven't purchased anything so I'm more than happy to entertain other ideas.

I know that laptops are everyone's favorite answer when presented with the idea of a computer designed for travel, but please humor me.
 

jay32267

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If you decide to go with dampening standoffs....be aware than some motherboard standoffs are used as grounds......so if you insulate them....you may run into problems.

other than that.....I can't think of much you can do other than minimize the shock and vibration that the Pelican case is exposed to.
 

Meltdown19k

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If you decide to go with dampening standoffs....be aware than some motherboard standoffs are used as grounds......so if you insulate them....you may run into problems.

other than that.....I can't think of much you can do other than minimize the shock and vibration that the Pelican case is exposed to.
That's an excellent point. I would imagine if I leave one or two uninsulated they would still perform the job just as well though, right?
 

USAFRet

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This is a tough one.
I would think that being bolted securely to the case would provide more shock dampening. More mass.
Having the motherboard float on what would need to be very thin isolation dampers might increase it moving around a teeny bit.
 
Hello,

I'm working on building a small PC case that will fit inside a pelican 1510 case with some foam for travel. I've got the case and all my hardware figured out, but I'm looking for any additional things I can do to help insulate it from the vibrations and bumps of rolling the case around. I have support brackets for the GPU and cooling block, but I'm trying to find some sort of vibration dampening standoffs for the motherboard itself. The foam in the case is likely enough, but every little bit helps.

I'd also take suggestions for any sort of vibration resistance to incorporate into this, not just standoffs. I haven't purchased anything so I'm more than happy to entertain other ideas.

I know that laptops are everyone's favorite answer when presented with the idea of a computer designed for travel, but please humor me.
Standoffs are between 4mm-10mm in height and use a 6-32 thread. The only thing you could really do is find rubber washers the same height range, 6-32 threaded rod, 6-32 nuts, and some thread lock compound then bolt it all together. Under pressure that would give you the ground needed for use and the rubber washers would give you some anti-shock capabilities. Honestly, with a pelican, you have very good anti-vibration as is. For heavy travel most people buy laptops for the very reason PC's are not designed to be lugged around constantly.
 

Meltdown19k

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This is a tough one.
I would think that being bolted securely to the case would provide more shock dampening. More mass.
Having the motherboard float on what would need to be very thin isolation dampers might increase it moving around a teeny bit.
I might be misunderstanding protection from shock/impact, but wouldn't the float be fairly minimal if it were attached firmly to a rubber washer?

For heavy travel most people buy laptops for the very reason PC's are not designed to be lugged around constantly.
Of course, I'm not denying that... But at the same time where's the fun in a canned solution?!
 

USAFRet

Titan
Moderator
I might be misunderstanding protection from shock/impact, but wouldn't the float be fairly minimal if it were attached firmly to a rubber washer?
Yes, but what level of 'vibration/movement' are we considering here.

If it is isolated via rubber, then the motherboard can move on its own. Even a teeny bit...sub millimeter.
Locked to the case, then the whole case would have to move like that.

I'm not saying either way is definitively good or bad.
Just that having the board float may not be the best answer. It leaves it to vibrate on its own.

I suspect lab testing may be in order to see which path treats the motherboard better.
Of course, lab testing may be a restrictive pathway to follow...:)
 
I might be misunderstanding protection from shock/impact, but wouldn't the float be fairly minimal if it were attached firmly to a rubber washer?



Of course, I'm not denying that... But at the same time where's the fun in a canned solution?!
You have very little options, for what you want they don't make to fit traditional PC case. You have a very little float or impact resistance at all because the backplate that is attached to the PC case and your motherboard press pretty firmly into each other and negate any gain you have from adding padding or rubber between the case and motherboard.

Part of owning a computer is knowing what it is good for. I tossed a Toughbook out a 2 story window and it worked fine, I dropped a Mid Tower 3 feet and it was ruined. :ROFLMAO:
 
And part of being a modder is changing what they're good for
An Engineer changes what they are good for.. a modder just makes things look pretty. :giggle:

Any of these can give you good impact resistance.

  1. Rubber Dampers and carbon fiber bracket combinations ( " Drone applications" )
  2. Vibration Isolators ( " Drone applications" )
  3. High Deflection Silicone mounts
  4. All Attitude Mounts
  5. Clear Ballistics Gel. Certain brands have a melting point of 198 degrees so you could easily make your own.


You will need 13mm or more from the bottom of the case to the motherboard which means a true "Custom built"
The Backplate will have to be free-floating if you're using it at all.
 
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Out of curiosity, where did the 13mm number come from? I can certainly account for it, but what is it for?
Mounting height is going to be determined by the overall weight and stiffness of the material.

Examples

Silicone and Neoprene Mountings

Axial-Radial Stiffness Ratio: 1:1
Supports up to 2 lbs
Height of .375 inches or 9.525mm

Axial-Radial Stiffness Ratio: 1:1.6
Supports up to 3 lbs
Height of .41 inches or 10.4mm

What is the combined weight you are looking at supporting? I assumed that you are looking at a range or around 5lbs which can be done with a clearance of 13mm.
 

Meltdown19k

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Probably closer to 10. My video card weighs about 4.6 pounds and I think the Noctua weighs about the same. I haven't bought the Noctua just yet, though. Kind of top heavy for my applications.
 

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