Question Viper Steel 4400mhz refuses to stable overclock in x570 Auros Ultra w/ Ryzen 3900x

Jun 23, 2019
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Hi,

So I just parted out a new PC a few days after the release of the Ryzen 3900x. I was able to get one along with a new x570 Auros Ultra motherboard, two sticks of 4400mhz Viper Steel RAM (PVS416G440C9K), and a GTX 2080ti.

Overall, the machine fit together perfectly and has worked extremely well. There's been one exception. I cannot overclock my memory at all.

No matter what edits I make in the BIOS, they will never save (and I definitely chose to Save & Exit). Changes will never work no matter how reasonable. The device will sometimes refuse to reboot until I flash the CMOS. At other times, the changes I make just do not appear when I open up CPUz or Ryzen Master. And when I return to the BIOS to check, it tells me that the BIOS has been reset on the initial screen. It reset itself in those instances. This includes the SMALLEST incremental single change to absolutely any value anywhere in the BIOS.

So I tried to overclock instead using Ryzen Master. The CPU overclocked just fine to any amount, but I currently have it set to 4.6 which is the advertised maximum. Should I back off of that? Granted, the very first thing I tried to overclock was the RAM. It didn't work before I boosted the CPU, or after it. Literally any change I make in Ryzen Master to the memory will result in one of three things:

1.) The machine won't post until I flash the CMOS (Very rare so far when working in Ryzen Master).
2.) The machine restarts normally, but opens Ryzen Master automatically, and reports that the applied profile was not stable, and thus will not be used (Extremely rare, only happened once so far when I tried to manually replicate the supported RAM's XMP profile settings in Ryzen Master.)
3.) 99% of the time, the machine restarts as normal. My changes are visible when I open up CPUz, and I see my overclocking worked. Everything seems to be fine from a stability perspective, but if I ever try to open Ryzen Master again, the computer will hard crash to an unpowered state. If I ever want to open Ryzen Master again, I must erase the profile that I chose to "Apply & Test" originally, which I normally do by uninstall/reinstalling since its a fast process. This, however, will erase any overclocking that I did.

What is going on with this? Is it my fault? Is it Ryzen Master's fault? Is it some weird BIOS issue that prevents me from changing settings in the BIOS? Is it the RAM's fault? Is it any combination of these? I am at a loss. I've been playing with this for a month now, and nothing works. I've read countless guides to overclocking memory, and none of the guides mention this problem.

I promise I am testing with the most incremental changes imaginable. Starting with the next highest mhz boost to the base clock of the RAM, and everything else you can imagine. I've created support tickets with Auros and get zero responses.
 
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Jun 23, 2019
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I'm guessing that that at this point, the issue is with Ryzen Master. Maybe I should just overclock, and not touch Ryzen master afterwards?
 
Jun 23, 2019
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Just a heads up to anyone overclocked a Ryzen 3900x with an Auros x570 motherboard and Patriot Viper Steel memory, as of 8/31/2019, your maximum overclock is 1533 mhz, both memory and fabric overclock. I've tried everything.

They released a BIOS (F5) patch that should help with overclocking. It helped somewhat. In particular, it has throttled overclocking down to what appears to be the maximum that can currently be handled. No matter what you try to overclock to, it will set to 1533 (which is 3066 actual mhz). Don't bother trying to go above that until they update the BIOS further beyond F5.

If you have F4, make sure you update the BIOS asap. The revision 1 BIOS is subpar, even if it F5 is not a major improvement. At least F5 will boot and throttle overclocks that it cannot handle. F4 will not boot overclocks at all.
 

QwerkyPengwen

Dignified
Herald
The higher you go in speeds the more strict things become in terms of compatibility of that ram running at its rated speed. And with that speed it's no wonder it doesn't work. That ram you bought is not on the QVL so it wasn't guaranteed to work as intended on that motherboard in the first place and it looks like it doesn't.

If wanting memory of that high a speed should consult the QVL next time.
 
Reactions: Phaaze88
Jun 23, 2019
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The higher you go in speeds the more strict things become in terms of compatibility of that ram running at its rated speed. And with that speed it's no wonder it doesn't work. That ram you bought is not on the QVL so it wasn't guaranteed to work as intended on that motherboard in the first place and it looks like it doesn't.

If wanting memory of that high a speed should consult the QVL next time.
Yeah, hindsight is 20/20. I had never heard of a Qualified Vendor List (QVL) until a few weeks ago, after I parted out my PC and constructed it. We all start from the bottom as far as knowledge goes. I used PC Part Picker and a few other part matching services to find that this RAM was compatible. I just didn't know that RAM at different speeds changed the game so much from a compatibility perspective.

So I realized this now, and next time I will scour the QVL for my chosen motherboard before I buy RAM. But this is all worth noting for those who do not have QVL RAM.
 

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