Voltage Changing Problem

kyeana

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Hi, i currently have my machine at a 30% overclock at 33 idle and 57 load. I was trying to get it higher but i keep getting errors. After looking at CPU-Z it looks like none of the changes i have made to the cpu voltages in my bios have actually taken affect.

It is manually set to 1.35 volts however it is showing up as 1.30 volts in CPU-Z, and the bios confirm that it is only getting 1.30 volts. I haven't flashed to the newest bios version yet (will do that when i get home) but i was wondering if there is anything else that could be keeping the cpu from getting the correct voltage. I have speedstep turned off but perhaps there is some other such feature that keeps the cpu undervolted?

Thanks in advance
 

kyeana

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wow...i dont doubt that that link could prove quiet helpful but just looking at it made my head spin... what does it mean in simple non mathematical terms?
 

ausch30

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"The first question that may come to mind is why droop voltage at all. Truthfully, in most cases the designer may determine that a more cost-effective solution can be achieved by adding droop. Droop can help to reduce the output-voltage spike that results from fast load/current demand changes. The magnitude of the spike is proportional to the magnitude of the load swing and the ESR/ESL of the output capacitor(s) selected. By positioning the no-load voltage (VNL) level near the upper specification limit (bound by the Vccmin load line), a larger negative spike can be sustained without crossing the lower limit. By adding a well controlled output impedance (RLL), the output voltage under load can be effectively 'level shifted' down so that a larger positive spike can be sustained without crossing the upper specification limit (such as when the system suddenly leaves a heavy load condition). This makes sense as the heavier the CPU loading the smaller the potential negative spike and vice versa for lower CPU loading/positive spikes. The resulting system is one in which the system operation point is bound by Vccmin and Vccmax at all times (although short excursions above Vccmax are allowed by design)."


It's a way their engineers use to keep the voltages from wildly fluctuating during idle to load shifts. You should notice that your voltages are slightly higher during idle than the are during load. Asus uses something called Loadline Calibration in their newer motherboards to combat this and to regulate voltage but it doesn't work quite as well as it should.
 

kyeana

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Thats the whole problem, i have raised the vcore up to 1.37 but in the bios (pc health section) and in cpu-z it still shows that the cpu is only getting 1.3 volts... am i just missing something?
 

zipz0p

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You don't want to get rid of Vdroop usually. A good read: http://www.anandtech.com/showdoc.aspx?i=3184&p=1

Page 5 is the one particularly relevant to the Vdroop issue. It's a part of Intel's specification and probably shouldn't be messed with. If you level out the voltage, then when moving from load to idle, your CPU voltage will spike above the voltage you want it to get, which could damage your CPU at higher voltages.
 

ausch30

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You can't raise it any higher than that? My BIOS is set at 1.35 right now and my CPU is running at 1.3 so what your experiencing is a normal droop but you should be able to raise the vcore higher than that.
 

kyeana

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maybe thats the problem, i haven't tried raising it past 1.37 in the bios but on both 1.35 and 1.37 idling it shows up as 1.30. Should i just keep raising it until i notice a change in voltage?