[SOLVED] Was planning to buy Ryzen 5 1600, but the Ryzen 5 3500 is available now

akaikisaki

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Hello Guys,

Like the title says, I was planning to buy Ryzen 5 1600, but the Ryzen 5 3500 is available now in India.

Link for your referral:
https://www.amazon.in/AMD-Generation-Desktop-Processor-Socket/dp/B07YZR314W/ref=sr_1_4?keywords=ryzen+5+3600&qid=1574875095&s=electronics&sr=1-4

The details that I know about are:

1600 - 3.2ghz (base) - 3.6ghz (turbo) with 6 cores and 12 threads
3500 - 3.6ghz (base) - 4.1 ghz (turbo) with 6 cores and 6 threads

3500 is not even mentioned in the AMD's website. There is just the 3500U model.

Searching the internet, I got to know that the 3500 has been termed as an OEM, which, apart from the fullform, I don't know what exactly that means.

So could you please help me with this.

PS. I do know about the 2600 and the 3600, but I cannot buy them right now for the current price here. Expanding my budget from 1600 to 3500 is the only thing I can do right now.
 
....

If it were you, which one would you've preferred, the 2600 or the 3500?
I don't think it's that simple choice. First, I don't agree that games won't benefiit from the virtual threads SMT offers. Watching the newer AAA games I have, BF1 and Ghost Recon in particular, and even a few old(er) ones, Doom 2016 and Rise of the Tomb Raider, I see them throwing a ton of threads around with a lot of activity on all cores, both threads, on my 3700X. To be sure, only a couple (at most) are heavily loaded. But I have to believe running lightly loaded threads off the cores handling the principle threads will help game performance.

I am pretty sure that developers are much more likely to use the hardware in the market today, which offers 12+ CPU threads quite commonly. Not that the do it well... but that's another story perhaps.

Also, the Window's latest topology-aware scheduler along and updated chipset drivers from AMD are doing a much better job of scheduling threads to the strongest cores. And what's more, it also moves threads between cores with shared resources to help manage thermals. If that really does help manage processor thermals, it's got to help the CPU maintain boost clocks over time given the way Ryzen boosts (based on available thermal headroom).

But thing is, I really don't know how effective the new scheduler is on Ryzen 2000. It's not easy to do comparisons, since not only do you need the processors but also some external measuring equipment to do it right. Something the reviewers have.

If it were me, I'd probably opt for the 2600. Or 2600X if at all possible as it responds very well to PBO overclocking with much higher sustained boosts vs. 2600. That should close any IPC gap, and single thread performance, opened by Zen2 in the 3500.

ADD: BTW, comparing against a 1600 is way more difficult as you'd really have to manually overclock one to 3.9-4.0 Ghz range to get similar ST performance range. That would require a decent enough motherboard to do it.

And lastly: if gaming performance is the priority always keep in mind that it depends way more on GPU. So saving a few on CPU in order to go up a notch or two in GPU is almost always in your better interests.
 
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jay32267

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Here is what OEM means.
OEM stands for Original Equipment Manufacturer.

This is what Intel posts regarding this.

"As part of an original equipment manufacturer (OEM) system. ... We ship the processors to OEMs, and they typically pre-install the processor. We refer to these processors as tray or OEM processors. Intel doesn't provide direct warranty support. Contact your OEM or reseller for warranty support. "

So.....the OEM would be a company like HP or Dell.
 

akaikisaki

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Here is what OEM means.
OEM stands for Original Equipment Manufacturer.

This is what Intel posts regarding this.

"As part of an original equipment manufacturer (OEM) system. ... We ship the processors to OEMs, and they typically pre-install the processor. We refer to these processors as tray or OEM processors. Intel doesn't provide direct warranty support. Contact your OEM or reseller for warranty support. "

So.....the OEM would be a company like HP or Dell.
Thank you.

But in this case, if you check the link, they are providing it in a proper AMD box and it is not pre-installed in any system. People have also bought the 3500 and have posted videos about it too.

Although I would also like to buy it, i'm a bit skeptical because the Internet doesn't have much info about it for me to just buy it with my eyes shut. There aren't much reviews about it either and most of them are from Indian reviewers (I prefer reviews from outside India as well)
 
Nov 19, 2019
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Hey man, I recently bought Ryzen 5 3500 from SP Road (famous for computer parts) for INR 9500+GST.

I did a lot of research before going with this processor, I mainly compared this processor to i5 9400F, R5 2600 and R5 3600.

I went with this processor because, compared to i5 9400, the processor is cheap, has better single-core clock speeds, has better multi-core clock speeds. Good thing is, the processor and the motherboard are cheaper than the Intel's counterpart.

If you have more money to spare, go for the R5 3600 if you are into multitasking like Streaming + Gaming. However, if you only wish to use the processor for Gaming, I would recommend you to go with the R5 3500.

Please check out my benchmark in the below link.
http://valid.x86.fr/91av4a

Comparison of R5 3500 and R5 1600 (Clearly R5 3500 wins in this).
https://cpu.userbenchmark.com/Compare/AMD-Ryzen-5-3500-vs-AMD-Ryzen-5-1600/4053vs3919

If you have any questions regarding the processor, please let me know.
 
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OllympianGamer

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Hey man, I recently bought Ryzen 5 3500 from SP Road (famous for computer parts) for INR 9500+GST.

I did a lot of research before going with this processor, I mainly compared this processor to i5 9400F, R5 2600 and R5 3600.

I went with this processor because, compared to i5 9400, the processor is cheap, has better single-core clock speeds, has better multi-core clock speeds. Good thing is, the processor and the motherboard are cheaper than the Intel's counterpart.

If you have more money to spare, go for the R5 3600 if you are into multitasking like Streaming + Gaming. However, if you only wish to use the processor for Gaming, I would recommend you to go with the R5 3500.

Please check out my benchmark in the below link.
http://valid.x86.fr/91av4a

Comparison of R5 3500 and R5 1600 (Clearly R5 3500 wins in this).
https://cpu.userbenchmark.com/Compare/AMD-Ryzen-5-3500-vs-AMD-Ryzen-5-1600/4053vs3919

If you have any questions regarding the processor, please let me know.
I wouldn't have even thought that a320 motherboard and a zen 2 chip would have worked together, how did you know it would work before you purchased them?
 

akaikisaki

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May 16, 2014
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Hey man, I recently bought Ryzen 5 3500 from SP Road (famous for computer parts) for INR 9500+GST.

I did a lot of research before going with this processor, I mainly compared this processor to i5 9400F, R5 2600 and R5 3600.

I went with this processor because, compared to i5 9400, the processor is cheap, has better single-core clock speeds, has better multi-core clock speeds. Good thing is, the processor and the motherboard are cheaper than the Intel's counterpart.

If you have more money to spare, go for the R5 3600 if you are into multitasking like Streaming + Gaming. However, if you only wish to use the processor for Gaming, I would recommend you to go with the R5 3500.

Please check out my benchmark in the below link.
http://valid.x86.fr/91av4a

Comparison of R5 3500 and R5 1600 (Clearly R5 3500 wins in this).
https://cpu.userbenchmark.com/Compare/AMD-Ryzen-5-3500-vs-AMD-Ryzen-5-1600/4053vs3919

If you have any questions regarding the processor, please let me know.
Hey, thank you for the info.

INR 9500+GST would be around the same price as that of Amazon. So that's fine. Also, it seems you're in Bangalore. I'm in Delhi

It's not the price that's bothering me. It's whether I should trust this processor or not. It's not even there in the AMD's official website. Nor are there any reviews from top Youtubers and bloggers.
 

akaikisaki

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I wouldn't have even thought that a320 motherboard and a zen 2 chip would have worked together, how did you know it would work before you purchased them?

I guess by updating the Bios, the 3rd gen can be run on the 320 boards. The only limit is that Overclocking is not possible with these boards. This is what I found from the internet.

I will be buying a B450 board though, still deciding on that.
 

Simran Jeet

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Thank you.

But in this case, if you check the link, they are providing it in a proper AMD box and it is not pre-installed in any system. People have also bought the 3500 and have posted videos about it too.

Although I would also like to buy it, i'm a bit skeptical because the Internet doesn't have much info about it for me to just buy it with my eyes shut. There aren't much reviews about it either and most of them are from Indian reviewers (I prefer reviews from outside India as well)
Ryzen 5 3500 is available in asian markets, I reside in india and ryzen 5 3500 is available here for arround 10.5-11k rupees which is arround 150-160 dollar, note that pc parts are expensive here in india
 

akaikisaki

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Ryzen 5 3500 is available in asian markets, I reside in india and ryzen 5 3500 is available here for arround 10.5-11k rupees which is arround 150-160 dollar, note that pc parts are expensive here in india
Yes, I know that it's available in Amazon and a couple of other websites for around INR 11000.

I started this topic to get the opinions and maybe reviews from other users as to what they think about this, have they tried it, their experience, etc

It's the fact that it doesn't have much reviews is the reason why I started this topic. As of now, none of the frequent and reliable reviewers have reviewed this. There is also no info about the Overclocking as well as upto how much can it go, etc.

To confirm whether it is indeed genuine or not, and also whether it will be covered in the warranty, I contacted the AMD support and they informed me that it is covered, although it's details are not mentioned in the AMD website.
 
...
Searching the internet, I got to know that the 3500 has been termed as an OEM, which, apart from the fullform, I don't know what exactly that means.
....
You need to check the terms of sale where you're buying it. As I recall, when the 3500 processor was announced it was also stated it was to be exclusively made available in China (Asia) for inclusion in pre-builts. That suggests an OEM sale as a tray processor.

So it may be a Chinese company has seen an opportunity and bought up a bunch of tray processors, printed up some boxes to put it in and is selling them 'boxed'. But that doesn't mean AMD will not treat them as OEM and refer you back to the company you bought it from for warranty claim.

Probably the best way to do this would be to print on the box 'packaged and warranty by....' and the company that did the packaging; after all, who says 'pre-built' has to mean motherboard and case included LOL.

And finally, just because Intel treats OEM processors the way Jay32267 states doesn't mean AMD will. But I'd not count on it.

Because it's not a retail product available in the huge EU or NA markets it's of limited interest for reviewers to get hold of, except as a novelty. So that's doubtless why you've not seen any reviews. You'll have to judge potential performance from the processor's specifications and known performance of other Ryzen CPU's built on similar process node.

And in so far as overclocking or any other operation outside of spec, I'd say not to expect any. Ryzen has limited potential (none, really) even at top end and this is obviously a low-binned part.
 
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akaikisaki

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You need to check the terms of sale where you're buying it. As I recall, when the 3500 processor was announced it was also stated it was to be exclusively made available in China (Asia) for inclusion in pre-builts. That suggests an OEM sale as a tray processor.

So it may be a Chinese company has seen an opportunity and bought up a bunch of tray processors, printed up some boxes to put it in and is selling them 'boxed'. But that doesn't mean AMD will not treat them as OEM and refer you back to the company you bought it from for warranty claim.

Probably the best way to do this would be to print on the box 'packaged and warranty by....' and the company that did the packaging; after all, who says 'pre-built' has to mean motherboard and case included LOL.

And finally, just because Intel treats OEM processors the way Jay32267 states doesn't mean AMD will. But I'd not count on it.

Because it's not a retail product available in the huge EU or NA markets it's of limited interest for reviewers to get hold of, except as a novelty. So that's doubtless why you've not seen any reviews. You'll have to judge potential performance from the processor's specifications and known performance of other Ryzen CPU's built on similar process node.

And in so far as overclocking or any other operation outside of spec, I'd say not to expect any. Ryzen has limited potential (none, really) even at top end and this is obviously a low-binned part.
Okay.

Well AMD did say that;

"We are offering the AMD Ryzen 5 3500 processor to OEM partners and channels in certain regions."

With 'certain regions', it may be assumed that they may have sent it outside China as well, in my case, India.

If I look at the specs, it is indeed better than the Ryzen 1600. And might be better than the 2600 as well if we look at the benchmarking websites.

For the aftersale support, I contacted the AMD service centre and they told me that service will be provided for the 3500 as well. So it is covered too.

If it were you, which one would you've preferred, the 2600 or the 3500?
 
Nov 19, 2019
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I would go for 3500 due to Zen2 Architecture, and better Single-Core performance than 2600.

Hyperthreading doesn't matter much in the games, cause they mostly use 4 cores and this is where the single-core performance kicks in.

Just go for 3500, and if you have more budget, go for 3600.
 
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....

If it were you, which one would you've preferred, the 2600 or the 3500?
I don't think it's that simple choice. First, I don't agree that games won't benefiit from the virtual threads SMT offers. Watching the newer AAA games I have, BF1 and Ghost Recon in particular, and even a few old(er) ones, Doom 2016 and Rise of the Tomb Raider, I see them throwing a ton of threads around with a lot of activity on all cores, both threads, on my 3700X. To be sure, only a couple (at most) are heavily loaded. But I have to believe running lightly loaded threads off the cores handling the principle threads will help game performance.

I am pretty sure that developers are much more likely to use the hardware in the market today, which offers 12+ CPU threads quite commonly. Not that the do it well... but that's another story perhaps.

Also, the Window's latest topology-aware scheduler along and updated chipset drivers from AMD are doing a much better job of scheduling threads to the strongest cores. And what's more, it also moves threads between cores with shared resources to help manage thermals. If that really does help manage processor thermals, it's got to help the CPU maintain boost clocks over time given the way Ryzen boosts (based on available thermal headroom).

But thing is, I really don't know how effective the new scheduler is on Ryzen 2000. It's not easy to do comparisons, since not only do you need the processors but also some external measuring equipment to do it right. Something the reviewers have.

If it were me, I'd probably opt for the 2600. Or 2600X if at all possible as it responds very well to PBO overclocking with much higher sustained boosts vs. 2600. That should close any IPC gap, and single thread performance, opened by Zen2 in the 3500.

ADD: BTW, comparing against a 1600 is way more difficult as you'd really have to manually overclock one to 3.9-4.0 Ghz range to get similar ST performance range. That would require a decent enough motherboard to do it.

And lastly: if gaming performance is the priority always keep in mind that it depends way more on GPU. So saving a few on CPU in order to go up a notch or two in GPU is almost always in your better interests.
 
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akaikisaki

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Okay.
To be sure, I did watch comparison videos of SMT On and Off during gaming, and couldn't see much of a difference which would affect me.

Nowadays, people mostly use their PC for running multiple programs at once, streaming, Video Editing, etc. And from what I've realized, they are the ones who will go down deep into minute level comparisons to find what's best for them.

As for me, I'm still a basic user and I'm only looking for a build so that I can run the games smoothly. I think a jump from the Intel G4400 to a Ryzen 5 (be it 1600, 2600 or 3500) is going to be huge in itself.

I might be going ahead with the 3500, and I'm just waiting for some kind of Online Sale so that I get some sort of additional discount as well. The board which I've shortlisted would be a B450 Tomahawk Max.

Honestly speaking, my budget for a CPU + Mo/Bo was $153 to begin with, and Intel was what I had in mind(new as well as used). It rose to $209 when I got to know about Ryzen 1600 and an AMD board. So in a way, I was already going past my budget. And it further increased to $293 with the Ryzen 3500 and a good B450 motherboard. The price of 2600(which is costlier than the 3500 as well in India) will be way above my already over-exceeded budget.

So, for me, it would be the 3500. Thank you all for helping me out.
 

atljsf

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i have bought oem parts in the past many times

the warranty often is just 3 or 6 months, you get the most ugly box, if there is a box

being a oem cpu i expect it to be a tray cpu, amd sell 100 units trays, the idea is you, as a oem, buy these cpus without box or heatsink, you put them on a motherboard, put the heatsink you decide and sell and support them

my current r3 2200g is a oem tray cpu, when the seller gave it to me, he gave me a wraith spire and a box from another ryzen he had, in the process of put it on the box, and me going back to my home, around 20 pins got bent, being the cpu inside the plastic case that comes with any ryzen cpu

bend back the pins is not hard, specially if they are not that bent, so it took me like 3 minutes and all went well, but is something to consider with these oem tray cpus

also is worth to mention that on some countries the word oem is also associated to sell the product without warranty, taxes or register, in these days where sales are made online this doesn't happen that often, but is worth to keep in mind, a oem cpu is you on your own basically

i took the risk because i knew the seller, and is not my first oem tray cpu, so i already had the experience and knew how to handle the situation, but if it is your first build and you are not much experienced, the r5 1600 is a great cpu

perhaps i didn't read properly, forgive me if already was mentioned and i didn't saw it but r5 3500 is a 6 cores and 6 threads only aprt, contrary to the 6 cores and 12 threads on the r5 1600, but this cpu does not come with vega graphics, so loose 6 threads, personally to me, seems like a bad idea, i would hate to buy such cpu but loose half the threads

it is basically a intel i5 9400f, and that cpu is a bad purchase, because it doesn't come with a gpu in it either
 
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akaikisaki

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i have bought oem parts in the past many times

the warranty often is just 3 or 6 months, you get the most ugly box, if there is a box

being a oem cpu i expect it to be a tray cpu, amd sell 100 units trays, the idea is you, as a oem, buy these cpus without box or heatsink, you put them on a motherboard, put the heatsink you decide and sell and support them

my current r3 2200g is a oem tray cpu, when the seller gave it to me, he gave me a wraith spire and a box from another ryzen he had, in the process of put it on the box, and me going back to my home, around 20 pins got bent, being the cpu inside the plastic case that comes with any ryzen cpu

bend back the pins is not hard, specially if they are not that bent, so it took me like 3 minutes and all went well, but is something to consider with these oem tray cpus

also is worth to mention that on some countries the word oem is also associated to sell the product without warranty, taxes or register, in these days where sales are made online this doesn't happen that often, but is worth to keep in mind, a oem cpu is you on your own basically

i took the risk because i knew the seller, and is not my first oem tray cpu, so i already had the experience and knew how to handle the situation, but if it is your first build and you are not much experienced, the r5 1600 is a great cpu

perhaps i didn't read properly, forgive me if already was mentioned and i didn't saw it but r5 3500 is a 6 cores and 6 threads only aprt, contrary to the 6 cores and 12 threads on the r5 1600, but this cpu does not come with vega graphics, so loose 6 threads, personally to me, seems like a bad idea, i would hate to buy such cpu but loose half the threads

it is basically a intel i5 9400f, and that cpu is a bad purchase, because it doesn't come with a gpu in it either
Thank you for providing the in-depth details.

Yes, from what I've read, everyone has said the same thing. 3500 was supposed to be included in Pre-builds/ts. But few of the sellers must be selling the processor individually too. They even have a proper 3500 box which I've seen in the few videos I could find. Packaging was fine enough, and similar to the way other Ryzens are packed. So that covers the packaging part.

As for warranty, Amazon does provide 10 days' replacement, so if I receive a CPU with bent pins or anything else, I can get it replaced or even get a refund. Also, the AMD service centre in India told me that it is covered in proper AMD warranty here, that would mean 3 years. So that covers the warranty as well.

As for the performance, yes it is a 6 threaded model compared to 1600's 12 threads. Both of them have their own positives and negatives.

3500 is based on the new Zen architecture, has better single core performance, is the 3rd generation CPU, and rated better in the benchmarking websites. The negatives are that it only has 6 threads and no SMT.

1600 is available at $30 less than the 3500, has 12 threads and supports SMT. Performance can be tweaked to match with the 3500 through Overclocking as well. It is less powerful than the 3500 and belongs to the 1st generation.

The price difference between both is just $30.

It will take around a months' time for me to actually buy any of these. I will look out for new reviews as well for the 3500. From what I've seen till now, it is indeed performing better for those who bought it.

That being said, it all comes down to this. What is more future proof:

a). an older CPU which has more threads and provide SMT/HyperThreading, or;

b). a new gen CPU which has better performance than the older one, but only 6 threads and lacks SMT.

And I don't know which one would be the wise choice 😣
 

atljsf

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Thank you for providing the in-depth details.

Yes, from what I've read, everyone has said the same thing. 3500 was supposed to be included in Pre-builds/ts. But few of the sellers must be selling the processor individually too. They even have a proper 3500 box which I've seen in the few videos I could find. Packaging was fine enough, and similar to the way other Ryzens are packed. So that covers the packaging part.

As for warranty, Amazon does provide 10 days' replacement, so if I receive a CPU with bent pins or anything else, I can get it replaced or even get a refund. Also, the AMD service centre in India told me that it is covered in proper AMD warranty here, that would mean 3 years. So that covers the warranty as well.

As for the performance, yes it is a 6 threaded model compared to 1600's 12 threads. Both of them have their own positives and negatives.

3500 is based on the new Zen architecture, has better single core performance, is the 3rd generation CPU, and rated better in the benchmarking websites. The negatives are that it only has 6 threads and no SMT.

1600 is available at $30 less than the 3500, has 12 threads and supports SMT. Performance can be tweaked to match with the 3500 through Overclocking as well. It is less powerful than the 3500 and belongs to the 1st generation.

The price difference between both is just $30.

It will take around a months' time for me to actually buy any of these. I will look out for new reviews as well for the 3500. From what I've seen till now, it is indeed performing better for those who bought it.

That being said, it all comes down to this. What is more future proof:

a). an older CPU which has more threads and provide SMT/HyperThreading, or;

b). a new gen CPU which has better performance than the older one, but only 6 threads and lacks SMT.

And I don't know which one would be the wise choice 😣
it is very good that you know now all that information, you will not get bad surprises

if the oem part has the warranty you mention, seems like a even more secure purchase than what i did

as i mentioned, bent pins are nt the end of the world, unless the bent pins looks like these



that cpu is f....

in a moth you might even find the 3500x as easy as that, the 3500x will overclock by itself at almost the levels of a manual overclock but with the advantage of also downclocking itself when not needed the overclock, this is great for noise, heat and power consumption, when you manually overclock, the cpu basically goes all the time on high consumption, high speed and high heat generation, i personally don't like that
 
... a oem cpu is you on your own basically
....
I would agree with that... a point worthy of caution. But good thing about a CPU, if works well out of the box and for a few weeks after it is extremely likely it will be equally good for it's design life. Barring misuse, of course.

So get it from a supplier that has a decent return policy (as your Amazon supplier seems to be) and don't dawdle putting it in to get a good idea if it's working well. Test it out thoroughly, maybe constantly running heavy loads for a day or two solid (or something within the return period). If it still works well at the end of it you're not likely to have any problems during it's time in your computer.

Last I heard the only real difference between 3500 and 3500X processor is the 3500 may have 1/2 the L3 cache. That suggests some variability in how the chiplets have cores disabled which reduces total cache to the 3500 part.

But both are full-on Zen2 arch. so they should share boosting patterns of Zen2.
 
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atljsf

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about the 1 moth, in a moth you might find the r5 2600 cheaper, in fact i think i saw a video where someone said that r5 2600 at the moment is 114 dollars

if you ask me, i would go for the 12 threads, just because look at all those threads on task manager is really a impressive thing to look at

if you do video editing, video conversion or stream, those 12 threads will help you

keep in mind that if you are going to keep a old gpu with the new cpu, your limitation will remain the gpu, few games will see the cpu change difference if you had a cpu bottleneck with the gpu you have now, i can confirm that with a r7 1700x and a gtx 750ti i have here, lots of games care very litle for the cpu, so get the fastest cpu doesn't end up being the most vital decision
 

akaikisaki

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Test it out thoroughly, maybe constantly running heavy loads for a day or two solid (or something within the return period). If it still works well at the end of it you're not likely to have any problems during it's time in your computer.
How can I do that? By running apps like Cinebench and CPUZ to push the cores to their limits? Could you give some suggestions as well?
 
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akaikisaki

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about the 1 moth, in a moth you might find the r5 2600 cheaper, in fact i think i saw a video where someone said that r5 2600 at the moment is 114 dollars
Ha ha ha....I don't think that's gonna happen here quite soon.
When the 1600 came out, it was being sold at $209+. And now, after few years it's available for $130.

At present, the 2600 is around $181+. For it to come down to a $114 mark, it will take quite some time.


if you do video editing, video conversion or stream, those 12 threads will help you
I'm not into video editing. Just gaming. Although, I might start get involved with video editing when uploading guitar covers. But that is something which I'm not so sure about.

keep in mind that if you are going to keep a old gpu with the new cpu, your limitation will remain the gpu, few games will see the cpu change difference if you had a cpu bottleneck with the gpu you have now, i can confirm that with a r7 1700x and a gtx 750ti i have here, lots of games care very litle for the cpu, so get the fastest cpu doesn't end up being the most vital decision
Okay, so do you think there might be a possibility that my current GPU may bottleneck the 3500? If that would be the case, then I won't overclock the 3500, but will OC the GPU only if the need arises.
 
How can I do that? By running apps like Cinebench to push the cores to their limits? Could you give some suggestions as well?
That's one way...CB20 has an option to do that, setting number of minutes or seconds to run the test continuously.

Another way is get something a stress-test utility like RealBench. This one tests the whole system, which might be good for a new-built computer.

Prime95 v.26.6 is also good, but do not use small FFT test (that's exceedingly unrealistic). Use LARGE FFT's and just leave it running.

And, of course, CPUz does have a stress tester. That would also work and it runs indefinitely, until stopped, by default.

BUT... if AMD is offering the full 3 year warranty I wouldn't worry that. The stress test is now mostly to proof the build.

BTW: someone with more GPU experience may have more info, but I'm gonna say that a 1050 (non-ti, 2GB) will be the bottle-neck in most any game. Most likely even at 1080p, medium settings and getting more so at higher settings or 1440+, where the card will be hitting PCie pretty hard. 720p, i'm not sure and probably depends more on title... they may actually be a good pairing at 720p.
 
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atljsf

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Ha ha ha....I don't think that's gonna happen here quite soon.
When the 1600 came out, it was being sold at $209+. And now, after few years it's available for $130.

At present, the 2600 is around $181+. For it to come down to a $114 mark, it will take quite some time.




I'm not into video editing. Just gaming. Although, I might start get involved with video editing when uploading guitar covers. But that is something which I'm not so sure about.



Okay, so do you think there might be a possibility that my current GPU may bottleneck the 3500? If that would be the case, then I won't overclock the 3500, but will OC the GPU only if the need arises.
no, my point is not to overclock anything, what i wanted to express is that the cpu is not the only important part, often you will feel the need of a better gpu than a better cpu, it all depends on what you have now and what you want to achieve

remember that overclocking a part sometimes at best gives you like 10% increase in fps, if you had around 30 fps in a game, overclocking it barely will push you into 34fps, and that is pretty much a no increase in reality, being optimistic, a 20% overclock will be 36 fps more or less, still not much really

so, a new cpu is great, but if it is a gaming pc, the gpu if is old, perhaps will need to be updated in a near future, to take advantage of the new cpu power you will be buying
 

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