[SOLVED] Water Cooler working properly?

Jun 20, 2019
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Hey,
I have a fractal design Celsius S36 cooling my i7 8086k. The thing is, the CPU gets extremely hot sometimes. In winter, when in a cool room, it goes up to about 97C. This was when overclocked to 5.1 GHz at 1.34V. When I tested it with default settings back then the CPU got up to 93C after a 30 minute stress test (Intel Extreme Tuning Utility).

I wrote to fractal support about that a while ago but they told me it is normal and when I said other people only get temps in the mid-80s (mostly with 8700k's) they told me some are better than others, so I just assumed I had lost the silicon lottery.

Now it's summer and I decided to check the temps when playing PUBG and it doesn't look great. Overclocked to 4.8GHz at 1.3V the CPUs cores peak from 91C to 97C. Am I really just unlucky or is something not right after all?

Here is a screenshot of HWMonitor:


The case is a be quiet dark base 700. The cooler is in the top. Is the case maybe too isolated?
Motherboard is an Asus Z370-F Gaming

Is it really normal or should I get a new cooler asap?
Thanks
 

Barty1884

Titan
Moderator
Ambient temps were pretty cool when I tested it back then, probably about 16-19C as I tested it fairly late with my window open and my PC off for a while before stress testing it. Not sure what idle temps were like. Now ambient temps are pretty warm, partially because of the CPU getting so hot.

As for fan profile, the cooler is plugged in CPU_FAN header and the fans ramp up as the CPU gets warm and I am sure they reach 100%. For the case fans, I am on Performance 2. Performance 3 is just a bit too loud.

Well, looks like it really is normal. I've been considering delidding and might try just that, I am just a bit scared that I break the CPU. I am sure I have an old CPU somewhere, maybe I'll try it on one of those before doing it on the 8086k.

Thanks
If ambient temps were fairly average, then yes, unfortunately, those temperatures are pretty "normal" for an 8086K in my experience.

Delidding can be scary, absolutely. It's not too difficult, but there is certainly the potential to damage an $X part - so tread carefully.
Consider the fan profile though..... if Performance3 is loud, but not necessarily unbearably so (and in a Be Quiet product, I'd be surprised if it was unbearable) - that might be a 'better' solution than delidding?

Make sure it's a one that can be delidded, not all cpus have a paste TIM.
Also, ^ this.

While the general principal is the same.... If you attempt to delid a soldered IHS (and can successfully remove it), you'll almost certainly ruin that CPU.
You can delid a soldered IHS CPU, but there's quite a few additional steps required. So you wouldn't learn anything relevant to the 8086K.

Also also... I would highly recommend a purpose built delid tool. They're not too expensive, and work well. The older vice methods etc, that you'll see a lot of on YT aren't a great idea for newer CPUs as the substrate is very thin.
 

Barty1884

Titan
Moderator
An 8086K, 8700K etc are pretty warm chips. I have my 8086K at 5GHz with an NH-D15 and it was hitting anywhere from high 80's to high 90's with stress tests. Ambient temps were ~22'C

What kind of ambient temperatures are you working with? What fan profile are you using? Assuming you're using the built in fan controller, ensure you're not using the "silent" options when under a stress load:

https://www.gamersnexus.net/hwreviews/3122-be-quiet-dark-base-700-case-review


While it's not for everyone, I had really, really good success delidding my 8086K (see spoiler below if interested). Shaved 15-23'C off, depending on the specific core.
Might be worth considering, if you can't do much in the way of airflow.

While it's possible the cooler isn't up to the task... .I very much doubt that.



 
Jun 20, 2019
8
0
20
1
An 8086K, 8700K etc are pretty warm chips. I have my 8086K at 5GHz with an NH-D15 and it was hitting anywhere from high 80's to high 90's with stress tests. Ambient temps were ~22'C

What kind of ambient temperatures are you working with? What fan profile are you using? Assuming you're using the built in fan controller, ensure you're not using the "silent" options when under a stress load:

https://www.gamersnexus.net/hwreviews/3122-be-quiet-dark-base-700-case-review


While it's not for everyone, I had really, really good success delidding my 8086K (see spoiler below if interested). Shaved 15-23'C off, depending on the specific core.
Might be worth considering, if you can't do much in the way of airflow.

While it's possible the cooler isn't up to the task... .I very much doubt that.



Ambient temps were pretty cool when I tested it back then, probably about 16-19C as I tested it fairly late with my window open and my PC off for a while before stress testing it. Not sure what idle temps were like. Now ambient temps are pretty warm, partially because of the CPU getting so hot.

As for fan profile, the cooler is plugged in CPU_FAN header and the fans ramp up as the CPU gets warm and I am sure they reach 100%. For the case fans, I am on Performance 2. Performance 3 is just a bit too loud.

Well, looks like it really is normal. I've been considering delidding and might try just that, I am just a bit scared that I break the CPU. I am sure I have an old CPU somewhere, maybe I'll try it on one of those before doing it on the 8086k.

Thanks
 

Barty1884

Titan
Moderator
Ambient temps were pretty cool when I tested it back then, probably about 16-19C as I tested it fairly late with my window open and my PC off for a while before stress testing it. Not sure what idle temps were like. Now ambient temps are pretty warm, partially because of the CPU getting so hot.

As for fan profile, the cooler is plugged in CPU_FAN header and the fans ramp up as the CPU gets warm and I am sure they reach 100%. For the case fans, I am on Performance 2. Performance 3 is just a bit too loud.

Well, looks like it really is normal. I've been considering delidding and might try just that, I am just a bit scared that I break the CPU. I am sure I have an old CPU somewhere, maybe I'll try it on one of those before doing it on the 8086k.

Thanks
If ambient temps were fairly average, then yes, unfortunately, those temperatures are pretty "normal" for an 8086K in my experience.

Delidding can be scary, absolutely. It's not too difficult, but there is certainly the potential to damage an $X part - so tread carefully.
Consider the fan profile though..... if Performance3 is loud, but not necessarily unbearably so (and in a Be Quiet product, I'd be surprised if it was unbearable) - that might be a 'better' solution than delidding?

Make sure it's a one that can be delidded, not all cpus have a paste TIM.
Also, ^ this.

While the general principal is the same.... If you attempt to delid a soldered IHS (and can successfully remove it), you'll almost certainly ruin that CPU.
You can delid a soldered IHS CPU, but there's quite a few additional steps required. So you wouldn't learn anything relevant to the 8086K.

Also also... I would highly recommend a purpose built delid tool. They're not too expensive, and work well. The older vice methods etc, that you'll see a lot of on YT aren't a great idea for newer CPUs as the substrate is very thin.
 
Jun 20, 2019
8
0
20
1
If ambient temps were fairly average, then yes, unfortunately, those temperatures are pretty "normal" for an 8086K in my experience.

Delidding can be scary, absolutely. It's not too difficult, but there is certainly the potential to damage an $X part - so tread carefully.
Consider the fan profile though..... if Performance3 is loud, but not necessarily unbearably so (and in a Be Quiet product, I'd be surprised if it was unbearable) - that might be a 'better' solution than delidding?



Also, ^ this.

While the general principal is the same.... If you attempt to delid a soldered IHS (and can successfully remove it), you'll almost certainly ruin that CPU.
You can delid a soldered IHS CPU, but there's quite a few additional steps required. So you wouldn't learn anything relevant to the 8086K.

Also also... I would highly recommend a purpose built delid tool. They're not too expensive, and work well. The older vice methods etc, that you'll see a lot of on YT aren't a great idea for newer CPUs as the substrate is very thin.
All right, thanks. I will think about delidding the CPU in the next few days while monitoring the temps to decide whether I think it's necessary or not.
 

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