Question Waterblock on GPU and Coolermaster H500M

Apr 29, 2019
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Hello!

I would like to buy the Coolermaster H500M to install my current configuration by adding a watercooling on my two graphics cards. My CPU is cooled by a Noctua NH-D15. I would like to keep it, it is effective and I "decorated" it with the Chromax kit. Except, that's one of the reasons I'm here looking for an answer, I read in a few places that it was a bad idea to only cool GPUs with water and not the CPU. While the opposite does not shock anyone...... The arguments put forward, such as the air in the box is hot so the CPU is badly cooled, hardly convince me, especially since in my case my cards sometimes get very hot and my CPU stays "fresh". Before I start assembling two waterblocks and the rest of the installation I came to see if anyone could give me an explanation that would convince me to spend 200 more.

My second question is more specific to the desired case. It is a classic case, equipped with two large fans at the front (200mm). Two 360° radiators can be installed at the top and front. Except that the two large front fans are, I imagine, not designed to work properly with a radiator, their static pressure being low. Do you think I should change them for three 120mm fans designed for CPU radiators or radiators or that I can "make up for it" by installing three fans in pull position? What is the loss of efficiency between the pull and the push'?
I think I'm going to start my watercooling circuit from my boards to the radiator at the top and then to the one on the front. The air introduced into the box would be relatively fresh. Am I right or am I wrong?

My config is as follows.

Motherboard. Asus TUF z270 mark1
Cpu: I7-7700k delid with copper IHS (when you love you don't count) :)
Graphics Card: Asus 1080ti in SLI
RAM: 16 giga in DDR 4
Samsung SSD 960 PRO Disc 512GB
Samsung SSD 860 EVO 1TB
WDC WD20EARX-00PASB0 (TYPE hdd 2T)

That's it, I thank you already for your answers, and I apologize to the moderators
if I haven't seen the topic with these same questions.

Etienne

Sorry for my poor english.....
 

Karadjgne

Titan
Herald
You are all over the place. Even the largest gpus are rarely ever used with anything more than a 120mm radiator, a 240mm at best. Easiest way to do that is with an AIO and a kit like a nzxt G-12.

Whomever said that the air in the box would be so hot the cpu would not be adequately cooled was so wrong as to be pathetic. If your gpu was putting out 200w worth of heat into the case with a normal couple of fans attached to the stock heatsink, how could adding a radiator and blowing 200w worth of heat inside be any different whatsoever. The only difference between the normal stock cooling and a custom loop or aio is Where the heat exchange happens. If it happens to be on the side of the case with most of the heat dumped outside, then bonus. But there's nothing that's going to raise temps beyond what they currently are.

Push/pull will get you 2-3°C better temps on average, with today's fan designs its honestly not worth the bother.
 
Apr 29, 2019
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You are all over the place. Even the largest gpus are rarely ever used with anything more than a 120mm radiator, a 240mm at best. Easiest way to do that is with an AIO and a kit like a nzxt G-12.

Whomever said that the air in the box would be so hot the cpu would not be adequately cooled was so wrong as to be pathetic. If your gpu was putting out 200w worth of heat into the case with a normal couple of fans attached to the stock heatsink, how could adding a radiator and blowing 200w worth of heat inside be any different whatsoever. The only difference between the normal stock cooling and a custom loop or aio is Where the heat exchange happens. If it happens to be on the side of the case with most of the heat dumped outside, then bonus. But there's nothing that's going to raise temps beyond what they currently are.

Push/pull will get you 2-3°C better temps on average, with today's fan designs its honestly not worth the bother.

I've already bought two waterblocks from EKWB. I would like to make a custom circuit in hard tube. I plan to put a radiator about 40mm high and about 70mm in front. Is that too much?
You confirm that it won't be a problem if I put the fans in pulling for the front radiator?
I plan radiators a little too big because I may want to cool my CPU one day too. But not right away.

I'm thinking of getting Bequiet shadow wings fans. Good idea? Or not? Everything else I take from EKWB. It's quite expensive but I don't want to order in Asia, I consume "local".

Thank you for the answers. Much more accurate than on French sites.
 

rubix_1011

Contributing Writer
Staff member
I'm here looking for an answer, I read in a few places that it was a bad idea to only cool GPUs with water and not the CPU.
I don't understand this statement...I have watercooled for nearly 17 years and I don't think I have ever seen anyone bring this up. In fact, GPUs typically do better with liquid cooling than CPUs, but there is no requirement for both to be included.
 
Apr 29, 2019
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A single 360mm radiator should be plenty to cool your gpus. If you mount it in front you will want to replace the two stock fans with three 120mm fans to match the radiator.

Hi, the configurator of EKWB advises me two 360mm slim ventirad. With a little security

I know that it's just a website that tries to sell me as much material as possible and that nothing beats the experience.

As I said above, I may want to cool down my CPU, motherboard and RAM one day. That way I would already have some of the equipment.
I would also like a rather quiet configuration.
Thank you for the answer
 
Apr 29, 2019
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I don't understand this statement...I have watercooled for nearly 17 years and I don't think I have ever seen anyone bring this up. In fact, GPUs typically do better with liquid cooling than CPUs, but there is no requirement for

thx for the answer


I am glad I am not the only one who thinks so. I thought it made sense to start cooling what is most hot.
I hope my big Noctua won't stop me from passing my pipes.

They would be right, but for other reasons.....
have a good day!
 

Karadjgne

Titan
Herald
Loops don't move heat. Loops move heat energy. Slight difference. Cpu block transmits energy to the liquid, moves through hoses to the rad, energy is transfered by the piping to the fins and dissipated. The liquid itself barely even gets any temp change. It's part of the reason stress temp tests take so long, it takes a cpu on a standard AIO about a half hour or more for that slow moving, tiny volume liquid to get even 1°C higher. Some of that heat energy bleeds through the hose, so the hose will feel hot, but the coolant isn't. It's just charged with heat energy. So it really doesn't matter where components are placed in relation to radiators, because a cpu and gpu combined don't put out all that big an amount of watts. Since full loops have a considerably higher tube volume and faster flowing pumps than AIO's, the coolant hits the rad, discharges what it can, moves on and gets charged again. But liquids can absorb a massive amount of energy, so there's plenty of space for anything in a pc, and then some.

If you figure the little burner on a stove can output well over 1500w, the metal pan will be extremely hot, the water takes forever to get warm, nevermind boil. On a normal sli loop with an OC cpu you are lucky to even get to 700w, most don't breach 600w worth. Kinda like trying to boil water with that burner on medium, might as well go watch a movie, you'll be at the end credits before that happens. If it happens.

Which is why you need to calculate your total heat energy wattage output, to match with enough rad ability to dissipate. If you figure a standard thickness 280mm rad is good for 350w, 2x is good for 700w. A slim rad lacks fin surface area compared to a standard rad, so isn't as efficient. To make up the difference, the rad is larger, so a slim 360mm is roughly equitable to a standard 280mm, so you'll need 2x slim 360mm to get @ 700w±
 
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Apr 29, 2019
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Okay. I will keep my two radiators but I will reduce their thickness.

I'll keep the two fans in front and put three 120mm fans behind the radiator. I'll put them in front of the radiator if I see that the temperatures are not good.
Thanks for the advice.

Is the EKWB material of good quality? Since I order everything from them, except the fans, I wouldn't want to be wrong.
For the fans, I was thinking of getting some bequiet silentwings. Good choice?

Have a good day, everyone!
 
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Gmoney06ss

Reputable
Jul 3, 2015
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I would recommend not leaving the two fans in front. They are not made for static pressure and it will probably make mounting the radiator difficult, if not impossible. Wether you mount the three fans in front of or behind the rad will make little difference, but do not leave the stock fans in, at all. In my setup I have the front fans in front of the rad, and on top of my rad that's mounted up top.

Ek makes great products! There radiators and blocks are amazing. The vardar fans are also top quality, and perfectly suited for radiators. I went with xspc fans and have been pleased, and the price was great!
 
Reactions: Karadjgne

Karadjgne

Titan
Herald
Yep, what he said. Except if generally running lower speed fans, pull helps slightly and makes a front access rad far easier to clean, don't have to remove the fans first. Just hit it with a vacuum hose so as not to blow dust into the pc.
 
Apr 29, 2019
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I would recommend not leaving the two fans in front. They are not made for static pressure and it will probably make mounting the radiator difficult, if not impossible. Wether you mount the three fans in front of or behind the rad will make little difference, but do not leave the stock fans in, at all. In my setup I have the front fans in front of the rad, and on top of my rad that's mounted up top.

Ek makes great products! There radiators and blocks are amazing. The vardar fans are also top quality, and perfectly suited for radiators. I went with xspc fans and have been pleased, and the price was great!

View: https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=hiZjdcgVvPs



What do you think of this installation? (1:40min) It leaves the two front fans, less efficient but perhaps more beautiful... It was that video that put me in doubt. Otherwise I would have removed them anyway. Thx for the help.
 

Gmoney06ss

Reputable
Jul 3, 2015
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You could go that way if you want. But if you're only trying to keep the rgb aspect of the front fans, I'd recommend getting good static psi rgb fans. Ek has some, xspc has some and I'm sure there's others ad well. It would be less efficient most definitely. But with two rads, you may get away with it. I'd still remove and replace them if it was my build.
 
Apr 29, 2019
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Yep, what he said. Except if generally running lower speed fans, pull helps slightly and makes a front access rad far easier to clean, don't have to remove the fans first. Just hit it with a vacuum hose so as not to blow dust into the pc.

Hahahaha, I haven't mounted anything yet and I already have a cleaning advice!!!!!
How often should I clean my radiators? When you see that the temperature increases?

Thanks for the advice!
 

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