[SOLVED] Weird Distorted Black Lines

Mar 9, 2020
3
0
10
0
It seems to happen when i play certain games not all of them though.
Most Prominent In:
GTA V
Tom Clancy's Rainbow Six Siege
Tom Clancy's Ghost Recon
Call of Duty Black Ops 3
Call of Duty Black Ops 4
There is also a couple of other games but it is bearable.
It also makes the game unplayable.
I have tried updating drivers and uninstalling but this has not worked.
I've also used different monitors with no luck & different cables
Im beginning to think this is GPU related.
Any advice would be appreciated!

(Pic)
https://ibb.co/RYR2RYN
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Do you have the same problem regardless of the monitor used? If so, then yes, I'd have to agree that this is likely either a graphics card or power supply related issue.

The Corsair CS750m is both a fairly old platform and one that wasn't very good even when it was new. It certainly wasn't the worst thing out there, but it wasn't great either. Any idea how long that power supply has actually been in service? Reviews of it are from back in or around 2013-2014, so I'm guessing that it is at least about 6-7 years old, in which case it is likely about 3-4 years PAST it's warranty date, which is when Corsair felt it might be reliable until. Problems with clean, adequate power delivery can certainly cause graphical glitches like what you are seeing, but so can a bad graphics card.

I'd recommend replacing that power supply regardless, since it is a very old platform, that is also likely to have seen way more service than it was ever expected to do, and ought to be replaced as a matter of course. It's also a lot cheaper than replacing the graphics card, besides which if you DO replace the graphics card at some point you would NOT want to run your new card on that old power supply anyhow.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
What are your full hardware specs including the EXACT model of your power supply AND how long it has been in service?

Have you tried using the DDU to completely wipe the old drivers and then followed up with a clean install of the latest ones?

Do you have the latest motherboard BIOS version installed?


If there are any steps listed here that you have not already done, it would be advisable to do so if for no other reason than to be able to say you've already done it and eliminate that possibility.



First,

make sure your motherboard has the MOST recent BIOS version installed. If it does not, then update. This solves a high number of issues even in cases where the release that is newer than yours makes no mention of improving graphics card or other hardware compatibility. They do not list every change they have made when they post a new BIOS release.


Second,

go to the product page for your motherboard on the manufacturer website. Download and install the latest driver versions for the chipset, storage controllers, audio and network adapters. Do not skip installing a newer driver just because you think it is not relevant to the problem you are having. The drivers for one device can often affect ALL other devices and a questionable driver release can cause instability in the OS itself. They don't release new drivers just for fun. If there is a new driver release for a component, there is a good reason for it. The same goes for BIOS updates.


IF you have other hardware installed or attached to the system that are not a part of the systems covered by the motherboard drivers, then go to the support page for THAT component and check to see if there are newer drivers available for that as well. If there are, install them.


Third,

Make sure your memory is running at the correct advertised speed in the BIOS. This may require that you set the memory to run at the XMP profile settings. Also, make sure you have the memory installed in the correct slots and that they are running in dual channel which you can check by installing CPU-Z and checking the Memory and SPD tabs. For all modern motherboards that are dual channel memory architectures, from the last ten years at least, if you have two sticks installed they should be in the A2 (Called DDR4_1 on some boards) or B2 (Called DDR4_2 on some boards) which are ALWAYS the SECOND and FOURTH slots over from the CPU socket, counting TOWARDS the edge of the motherboard EXCEPT on boards that only have two memory slots total. In that case, if you have two modules it's not rocket science, but if you have only one, then install it in the A1 or DDR4_1 slot.



The last thing we want to look at,

for now anyhow, is the graphics card drivers. Regardless of whether you "already installed the newest drivers" for your graphics card or not, it is OFTEN a good idea to do a CLEAN install of the graphics card drivers. Just installing over the old drivers OR trying to use what Nvidia and AMD consider a clean install is not good enough and does not usually give the same result as using the Display Driver Uninstaller utility. This has a very high success rate and is always worth a shot.


If you have had both Nvidia and AMD cards installed at any point on that operating system then you will want to run the DDU twice. Once for the old card drivers (ie, Nvidia or AMD) and again for the currently installed graphics card drivers (ie, AMD or Nvidia). So if you had an Nvidia card at some point in the past, run it first for Nvidia and then after that is complete, run it again for AMD if you currently have an AMD card installed.



Also, if this is a "no signal detected" or other lack of visual display problem, or even some kind of visual corruption such as pixelation or lines, it is probably a good idea to make sure the problem is not just a bad cable or the wrong cable IF this is a display issue. If it is NOT related to a lack of display signal, then obviously this part is not relevant to your issue.

This happens a lot. Try a different cable or a different TYPE of cable. Sometimes there can be issues with the monitor or card not supporting a specific specification such as HDMI 1.4 vs HDMI 2.0, or even an HDMI output stops working but the Displayport or DVI output still works fine on the graphics card. Always worth checking the cable and trying other cables because cables get run over, bent, bent pins or simply were cheap quality to begin with and something as simple as trying a different cable or different monitor might be all that is required to solve your issue.
 
Mar 9, 2020
3
0
10
0
What are your full hardware specs including the EXACT model of your power supply AND how long it has been in service?

Have you tried using the DDU to completely wipe the old drivers and then followed up with a clean install of the latest ones?

Do you have the latest motherboard BIOS version installed?


If there are any steps listed here that you have not already done, it would be advisable to do so if for no other reason than to be able to say you've already done it and eliminate that possibility.



First,

make sure your motherboard has the MOST recent BIOS version installed. If it does not, then update. This solves a high number of issues even in cases where the release that is newer than yours makes no mention of improving graphics card or other hardware compatibility. They do not list every change they have made when they post a new BIOS release.


Second,

go to the product page for your motherboard on the manufacturer website. Download and install the latest driver versions for the chipset, storage controllers, audio and network adapters. Do not skip installing a newer driver just because you think it is not relevant to the problem you are having. The drivers for one device can often affect ALL other devices and a questionable driver release can cause instability in the OS itself. They don't release new drivers just for fun. If there is a new driver release for a component, there is a good reason for it. The same goes for BIOS updates.


IF you have other hardware installed or attached to the system that are not a part of the systems covered by the motherboard drivers, then go to the support page for THAT component and check to see if there are newer drivers available for that as well. If there are, install them.


Third,

Make sure your memory is running at the correct advertised speed in the BIOS. This may require that you set the memory to run at the XMP profile settings. Also, make sure you have the memory installed in the correct slots and that they are running in dual channel which you can check by installing CPU-Z and checking the Memory and SPD tabs. For all modern motherboards that are dual channel memory architectures, from the last ten years at least, if you have two sticks installed they should be in the A2 (Called DDR4_1 on some boards) or B2 (Called DDR4_2 on some boards) which are ALWAYS the SECOND and FOURTH slots over from the CPU socket, counting TOWARDS the edge of the motherboard EXCEPT on boards that only have two memory slots total. In that case, if you have two modules it's not rocket science, but if you have only one, then install it in the A1 or DDR4_1 slot.



The last thing we want to look at,

for now anyhow, is the graphics card drivers. Regardless of whether you "already installed the newest drivers" for your graphics card or not, it is OFTEN a good idea to do a CLEAN install of the graphics card drivers. Just installing over the old drivers OR trying to use what Nvidia and AMD consider a clean install is not good enough and does not usually give the same result as using the Display Driver Uninstaller utility. This has a very high success rate and is always worth a shot.


If you have had both Nvidia and AMD cards installed at any point on that operating system then you will want to run the DDU twice. Once for the old card drivers (ie, Nvidia or AMD) and again for the currently installed graphics card drivers (ie, AMD or Nvidia). So if you had an Nvidia card at some point in the past, run it first for Nvidia and then after that is complete, run it again for AMD if you currently have an AMD card installed.



Also, if this is a "no signal detected" or other lack of visual display problem, or even some kind of visual corruption such as pixelation or lines, it is probably a good idea to make sure the problem is not just a bad cable or the wrong cable IF this is a display issue. If it is NOT related to a lack of display signal, then obviously this part is not relevant to your issue.

This happens a lot. Try a different cable or a different TYPE of cable. Sometimes there can be issues with the monitor or card not supporting a specific specification such as HDMI 1.4 vs HDMI 2.0, or even an HDMI output stops working but the Displayport or DVI output still works fine on the graphics card. Always worth checking the cable and trying other cables because cables get run over, bent, bent pins or simply were cheap quality to begin with and something as simple as trying a different cable or different monitor might be all that is required to solve your issue.
I have tried everything mentioned above with no luck. I have a Acer Predator XB241H FHD 144Hz G-Sync 24in Monitor, using a Displayport Cable also have used an HDMI cable yet problem still occurs.

My PC specs
asrock h170 fatal1ty
Intel I5 6600k
Corsair Vengeance LPX 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-2666 Memory
msi geforce gtx 1080 gaming x 8gb
Corsair CSM 750 W 80+ Gold Certified Semi-modular ATX Power Supply
Asus PCE-AC88 PCIe x1 802.11a/b/g/n/ac Wi-Fi Adapter
-
Also i just tested with a locked framerate at 60fps the problem wasnt as bad (still there though) but as i went up in locked fps e.g 120, 144. it got worse. This was on rainbow six siege, i also tried using in game vsync, Nvidia control global override vsync & also GSYNC but the problem still remanded. I've had this build for 3-4 yrs and it was always there this problem and i went back to the place which built the system & they said they fixed so i took it home and it still was there so i gave up on them
 
Last edited:

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Have you ever tried doing a clean install of Windows, ever, since this problem first began, whenever that was?

If not, that might not be the worst idea to consider trying followed by a clean install of your motherboard and graphics card drivers, if you are unable to get it resolved any other way. If that doesn't fix it, then it's a hardware issue of some kind.

It's an option anyhow and we see it cure a lot of otherwise unexplainable problems time after time.

 
Mar 9, 2020
3
0
10
0
Have you ever tried doing a clean install of Windows, ever, since this problem first began, whenever that was?

If not, that might not be the worst idea to consider trying followed by a clean install of your motherboard and graphics card drivers, if you are unable to get it resolved any other way. If that doesn't fix it, then it's a hardware issue of some kind.

It's an option anyhow and we see it cure a lot of otherwise unexplainable problems time after time.

I have tried all of these with no luck.
Thanks for trying to helps anyways!
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Do you have the same problem regardless of the monitor used? If so, then yes, I'd have to agree that this is likely either a graphics card or power supply related issue.

The Corsair CS750m is both a fairly old platform and one that wasn't very good even when it was new. It certainly wasn't the worst thing out there, but it wasn't great either. Any idea how long that power supply has actually been in service? Reviews of it are from back in or around 2013-2014, so I'm guessing that it is at least about 6-7 years old, in which case it is likely about 3-4 years PAST it's warranty date, which is when Corsair felt it might be reliable until. Problems with clean, adequate power delivery can certainly cause graphical glitches like what you are seeing, but so can a bad graphics card.

I'd recommend replacing that power supply regardless, since it is a very old platform, that is also likely to have seen way more service than it was ever expected to do, and ought to be replaced as a matter of course. It's also a lot cheaper than replacing the graphics card, besides which if you DO replace the graphics card at some point you would NOT want to run your new card on that old power supply anyhow.
 

ASK THE COMMUNITY

TRENDING THREADS