[SOLVED] Weird microsutter

May 30, 2022
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Hello, I have being dealing with this issue basically since building this PC in mid December 2021.
https://imageshack.com/i/po329wKLp
https://imageshack.com/i/po8hVJ9Hp
https://imageshack.com/i/plHsuT7tp


From what i've noticed that in the online games I play (single player does not have this issue for the most part) I have the same odd behaviour of the game(s) running fine and randomly tanking down in frames or dropping 2-3 frames for 1-2 seconds causing the screen to stutter out of nowhere and the weirdest part is this happens in every online game I play (For Honor, Warzone, Dead by Daylight to name a few) but not in single player games, while I don't mind the little hitches because they're bound to happen I cannot stand the random framerate tanking out of nowhere.

Specs:
RTX 3070
I5 12600K
Gigabyte Z690 UD DDR5 Motherboard
1 TB & 500GB SSD(s)
800W Be Quiet System Power 9 PSU
16GB DDR5 4800Mhz RAM

I've done -

Bios update (to latest)
W11 re-install
All necessary chipset, LAN and audio driver updates (from Gigabytes website regarding the mobo I have)
3 different GPU drivers (used DDU for each one)
Changing around game settings (like disabling v-sync and such)
Setting optimizations in NCVP.

The only possible lead I think I have is with Latencymon as i've been suggested by a friend whose way more versed in PC's to use the tool while the system is idle and while games run but i'm not sure what to exactly make of this.
Images for Latencymon are above.
 

geofelt

Titan
Your first image shows some 293732 hard page faults.
Over what time, I do not know.
But, a hard page fault interrupts cpu processing until it can be resolved.
That causes stuttering.

Normally, 16gb is fine for gaming.
But, if you are also running other apps, there may not be sufficient ram to keep all activity in ram.
I suspect that multiplayer with many participants will increase the number of tasks around and the associated ram storage required.
Any hard fault rate of more than zero while running a game should be investigated.
Run task manager while gaming.
Look at the resource monitor/memory tab.
There is a column that shows hard faults/sec

One other possibility is that core usage might be spilling over from the high performing P cores to the lower performing E cores.
Windows 11 is supposed to handle this.
But, you could experiment with disabling the E cores.










There should be no hard faults at all.
 

geofelt

Titan
Your first image shows some 293732 hard page faults.
Over what time, I do not know.
But, a hard page fault interrupts cpu processing until it can be resolved.
That causes stuttering.

Normally, 16gb is fine for gaming.
But, if you are also running other apps, there may not be sufficient ram to keep all activity in ram.
I suspect that multiplayer with many participants will increase the number of tasks around and the associated ram storage required.
Any hard fault rate of more than zero while running a game should be investigated.
Run task manager while gaming.
Look at the resource monitor/memory tab.
There is a column that shows hard faults/sec

One other possibility is that core usage might be spilling over from the high performing P cores to the lower performing E cores.
Windows 11 is supposed to handle this.
But, you could experiment with disabling the E cores.










There should be no hard faults at all.
 
May 30, 2022
3
0
10
0
Your first image shows some 293732 hard page faults.
Over what time, I do not know.
But, a hard page fault interrupts cpu processing until it can be resolved.
That causes stuttering.

Normally, 16gb is fine for gaming.
But, if you are also running other apps, there may not be sufficient ram to keep all activity in ram.
I suspect that multiplayer with many participants will increase the number of tasks around and the associated ram storage required.
Any hard fault rate of more than zero while running a game should be investigated.
Run task manager while gaming.
Look at the resource monitor/memory tab.
There is a column that shows hard faults/sec

One other possibility is that core usage might be spilling over from the high performing P cores to the lower performing E cores.
Windows 11 is supposed to handle this.
But, you could experiment with disabling the E cores.










There should be no hard faults at all.
I ran that test for an hour, regarding the hard faults i've taken a look at resource monitor with regards to the memory and the hard faults chart barely shows any increase, a tiny increase at that so i'll take a look at disabling the E cores but its weird because today i've freshly re-installed the system with a fresh installation so quite frankly its weird, thanks for the info however.
 

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