Question Well I bent my cpu pins bad, is my mobo socket ok?

Feb 10, 2021
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Well I had to remove my cpu fan to install extra ram, there was a bit of it blocking one of my dimm slots, the cpu was stuck to the heatsink so it came off quite hard. Me in my genius ideas, I didn't want to remove the cpu and reapply thermal paste. So I tired to mount it back on as it was. Well a little too much pressure and it mounted, powered on, ez cpu error light was obviously on. Took it back apart to see the lovely work I had just done and the result of the cpu is down below. Yes the cpu is a lost cause at this point I have to chalk it up to a very expensive lesson. My Question really is: Is my motherboard socket ruined? The heatsink was screwed back in place and obviously bent a lot of cpu pins. I'm scared to try and take the AM4 cover off, since it usually ends up in snapping the cover. So it probably will be impossible to tell

View: https://imgur.com/a/P3p56wM
 
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Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
There is no way to know. Generally, it's likely the motherboard is fine since it's not an LGA socket. But anytime you start bending contacts into positions they didn't belong in and then hit it with power, anything can happen.

Probably you're ok to simply replace the CPU, but if you want some kind of guarantee, you aren't going to find one. Anywhere. It's a case of either replace the motherboard too if you want to be 100% sure, or you roll the dice and hope that "probably ok" is what you land on.
 
Well I had to remove my cpu fan to install extra ram, there was a bit of it blocking one of my dimm slots, the cpu was stuck to the heatsink so it came off quite hard. Me in my genius ideas, I didn't want to remove the cpu and reapply thermal paste. So I tired to mount it back on as it was. Well a little too much pressure and it mounted, powered on, ez cpu error light was obviously on. Took it back apart to see the lovely work I had just done and the result of the cpu is down below. Yes the cpu is a lost cause at this point I have to chalk it up to a very expensive lesson. My Question really is: Is my motherboard socket ruined? The heatsink was screwed back in place and obviously bent a lot of cpu pins. I'm scared to try and take the AM4 cover off, since it usually ends up in snapping the cover. So it probably will be impossible to tell

View: https://imgur.com/a/P3p56wM
I wouldn't blow off the CPU just yet as only if a pin completely breaks off is it likely to be unsalvageable. The picture isn't 100% clear but it looks like the bent pins I see could be straightened. Use a .5mm Pentel mechanical pencil with lead removed to straighten the pins and stand them upright. If any are lying flat to the CPU use a long needle to lift it up enough to get the pencil tip over it and stand it upright. Then use a credit card between the rows, both directions, to get them all in perfect alignment before trying to place in the socket.

The CPU should drop into the socket with only slightest of pressure and a little bit of wiggling. If it doesn't, pick it up and check again that all the pins are straight and aligned in rows. If you're sure they're all straight and aligned and it just won't drop in easily, especially if it does on another motherboard, then you may have one or more damaged socket contacts. You can also look at the socket to see if it might be damaged...with a strong light look at the glinting of the copper contacts. You can often times spot a deformed contact because it shines back at you different than the others. But if you did it electrical damage you won't know until you go to power it up.
 
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Feb 10, 2021
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Thanks a lot for the replys. I did order a new CPU (Ryzen 5 3600 XT, I had a Ryzen 5 3600) and didn't order a board (I'm going to take a chance that I didn't mess the socket up) I am going to really closely examine the socket to see if I notice any inconsistencies.

There are about 25-30 bent pins with 3 bent straight down, however it does not look like any are actually partially or completely broke, just bent. So, I am going to try and fix it. I will post an update when I either get my current CPU fixed or the new one shows up and I try it, wish me luck.
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
Yes, fixing is an option, but don't cling to hope. Even one bent pin that is completely bent down is very hard to fix without breaking it while bending it back, much less MANY of them. But it can be done, with enough patience and some luck. It's equally possible though that no matter how careful and consistent you are with the process that you still break one, either visibly or down below the level of where you can see the contact point of the pin. That many pins, I'd be really surprised if you could fix it but it is certainly worth TRYING anyhow.
 
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There are about 25-30 bent pins with 3 bent straight down,
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Use a long needle and try to carefully slip the point of it under the 3 that are bent straight down. I did it successfully on a couple of pins on my 1700 when I smashed them down pretty good. It even slides down between the rows really nice to do it.

Also, after that bend it slowly up and minimize the re-touching of them. If bent fast you could cold-harden the metal, making it brittle and it will break off.
 
Reactions: Darkbreeze
Feb 10, 2021
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Well my new processor came and it will not latch in the am4 socket, no pins are bent, seems like I need a new motherboard at this point, well it's a really expensive lesson of don't try to cut corners.. The cover has a couple nicks on it that I believe is preventing it from setting properly.
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
Couple of things here.

One, you need to make sure you FULLY open the latch arm, ALL the way (As far as it will go without having to apply any kind of force to it anyhow) and THEN insert the CPU into the socket.

Two, once you install the CPU into the socket, place a finger lightly on the top of it while closing the latch to ensure the CPU does not try to move or shift.

Three, it usually takes about 25% more force to actually latch down the CPU than what you think it should take, or than it actually takes compared to when you've done it wrong and bent things all to hell. It is actually a somewhat scary feeling how much pressure you truly need to apply to get the latch to close and lock.

That being said, I'm also NOT saying that there isn't a problem either. I've personally never seen an AMD board or non-LGA type socket that had problems with the socket or receiver holes/contacts AFTER having bent the pins on a CPU from improper installation before, but that doesn't mean it can't happen, it's just a HECK of a lot less likely than with something like the Intel LGA type sockets where the pins are on the motherboard and not the CPU.



And if you're SURE you've done all that correctly and are applying enough force, but it still doesn't want to close without risking another bent CPU, then another motherboard might be necessary. Really, only you can make that determination. None of us are there to gauge how much force you're applying, so we can't really say yes or no to it either way.
 
Feb 10, 2021
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Thank you very much, you just saved me a bunch of time and money :) . When I built the computer I didn't have to put much force at all to put the CPU into the socket and latch it, I was afraid I would bend pins on my new processor, but, I tried again before I went off and ordered a new motherboard and with a little fiddling around and more force than I would of thought was necessary but not enough that I thought it would break it clicked in, mounted my fan and booted right up after the motherboard recognized the new hardware.
 

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