News Western Digital Launches WD Green SN350 M.2 SSD

USAFRet

Titan
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Mar 16, 2013
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WD should just retire the "Green" label.

It was not good for the original HDDs, it wasn't good for the "WD Green" SSD...
Why continue with it? Why hitch new technology to a failed brand model name?
 

CerianK

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Nov 7, 2008
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TBW below 100 for a new product... I thought it was a typo.
I don't care so much if I get the short-stick on a CPU, GPU, MB or RAM.
However, I expect most of my storage to last 10 years (even though I don't push it hard after 3-5 years).
Perhaps this will be good enough for mostly web-browsing, but would be disappointing down the road when they show up on the used market in pre-built systems.
 

chemistu

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Yes, the Green used to signify low performance / low power consumption, now it seems to mean low quality.

Also vaguely bemused by...
The SN350 is an entry-level SSD that slots perfectly into the PCIe 3.0 x4 interface.
Admittedly I have only fitted a few of these things, was I supposed to be using hammers to get them in?
 

2Be_or_Not2Be

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Aug 23, 2013
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"The SN350 flaunts sequential read and write speeds up to 2,400 MBps and 1,900 MBps, respectively. "

Instead of "flaunts", I think the author should have more appropriately used "hopes to reach" for this poorly-performing NVMe drive. :rolleyes:

Also QLC - yuck! Keep the QLC in a 2.5" format (U.2) where they can use it to make 4/8/? TB (or more!) drives, not in the small M.2 format which usually is the system's main drive.
 

escksu

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TBW below 100 for a new product... I thought it was a typo.
I don't care so much if I get the short-stick on a CPU, GPU, MB or RAM.
However, I expect most of my storage to last 10 years (even though I don't push it hard after 3-5 years).
Perhaps this will be good enough for mostly web-browsing, but would be disappointing down the road when they show up on the used market in pre-built systems.
10yrs??? You sure?

Anyway, the TBW isn't an issue for end users. 40TBW for the 240GB drive, thats equivalent to writing the entire drive 160 times. If you have to do that, you will definitely need a bigger drive.
 

CerianK

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10yrs??? You sure?
I am just reaching a self-imposed end-of-life on my 4TB HGST drive that I use as a master backup. Granted that in that capacity I am not doing much rewriting.
However, other drives I own will occasionally spill into repetitive page file read/write for days before I catch them... that just happened again a few weeks ago when testing WSL 2, since it moved to a monolithic memory model for Linux, so had to move some of that work back into WSL 1 (or I could have shelled out for another 32GB of ECC RAM, but all slots were full, so actually 64GB).
 

escksu

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I am just reaching a self-imposed end-of-life on my 4TB HGST drive that I use as a master backup. Granted that in that capacity I am not doing much rewriting.
However, other drives I own will occasionally spill into repetitive page file read/write for days before I catch them... that just happened again a few weeks ago when testing WSL 2, since it moved to a monolithic memory model for Linux, so had to move some of that work back into WSL 1 (or I could have shelled out for another 32GB of ECC RAM, but all slots were full, so actually 64GB).
Does your usage reflects what most end-users do on their PCs (Linux market share is less than 2%)?
 

jpe1701

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I think it's funny that the only ssd I've ever had fail on me was a samsung. It was a 250gb 850 evo and I didn't even bother pushing for an rma because they were so arrogant and insisted that one of their drives couldn't possibly have failed and I was just doing it wrong. Lol.
 

CerianK

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Does your usage reflects what most end-users do on their PCs (Linux market share is less than 2%)?
That Windows Subsystem for Linux example is just for one system, as I use Linux rarely.
With enough RAM, spilling into the hard drive should be rare for most users, but there are still many write intensive scenarios people run into. In my day job I work with customers that bump into drive re-write issues routinely, mostly with automated backups related to mechanical drives. As a worst-case example (related to a collision between quality and bean-counting), Dell was shipping workstations with RAID controllers that only had one drive attached, and it happened to be non-TLER rated, and a smaller size from the same series that were recalled in the Apple TV. I dealt with 100s of those drive failures within 1-5 years (no, Dell will not re-install or help setup Windows even if they replace the drive under warranty). While we can't be sure what the future holds for SSDs with low DWPD specs, I think most agree that throw-away tech is not in our collective best interest. If I had to use one, I would probably provision it at 50% capacity, for safety.
 

drtweak

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Only reason i can see myself even thinking about getting these is for some kind of cold/archive storage which sadly 960Gb doesn't cut it when the smallest drive I have is 4TB.

Glad i'm not the only one who came here to complain and wonder why WD even bothered to do this with such low TBW.

10yrs??? You sure?

Anyway, the TBW isn't an issue for end users. 40TBW for the 240GB drive, thats equivalent to writing the entire drive 160 times. If you have to do that, you will definitely need a bigger drive.

I have plenty of 10 year old hard drives that I just did a wipe on that are being retied from clients who upgraded to SSD's. No issues with them. Usually once clients hit the 7-8 year mark we kind of force them to upgrade or replace the PC
 

Giroro

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Yes, the Green used to signify low performance / low power consumption, now it seems to mean low quality.

Also vaguely bemused by...

Admittedly I have only fitted a few of these things, was I supposed to be using hammers to get them in?

"Green" means low-quality/high-margins for most other products, so why not for these drives as well?

Of course with endurance that low, maybe "green" just means more e-waste.. because its common for dumpsters to be painted green?
 

USAFRet

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Unfortunately they will probably sell to people that don't understand the endurance aspect of an ssd because of price and having the western digital name.
For normal consumers, "endurance" really isn't an issue.

But this being about 1/2 the speed of a typical NVMe drive, it is a poor choice, unless it is seriously inexpensive.
 

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