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Question What after Windows 10 ends support?

Fatalzo

Great
May 7, 2021
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I know that it's unhealthy to look into the future. But I just really need to prepare.

What should we all do when Windows 10 loses support?

We COULD upgrade to Windows 11. But then there's the whole issue with having very specific PC components like Apple, and it probably be getting worse in the future.

We COULD do what the Windows 7 users are doing, and that is keep the OS running by having third party software made for security and sticking to our OS.

Or we COULD switch to Linux. However, I have bad experiences with Linux. I ran it for a year as an experiment, and one day while running it, my Wifi card stopped working and didn't start working again until I installed Windows 10. Then again this Wifi card is absolute trash.

Plus, Linux usually runs hotter because of incompatibilities with the fans.

So which one of these should I consider? Or better yet, if there is a better option, should we consider that?
 

USAFRet

Titan
Moderator
Mar 16, 2013
144,591
8,665
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Ask again in 2024/2025, when Win 10 falls off actual support.

Any system you buy/build in the next couple of years will be Win 11 compatible.
Anything you bought/built in the last 2-3 years is Win 11 compatible.

Will you still be using the system you built 5 years ago?
 

Bazzy 505

Proper
Jul 17, 2021
247
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170
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Pretty much anything that doesn't support TMP 2.0 in one way or another will be 8+ years old by the time Win10 support runs out.
And i would be very surprised if MS didn't extend the support beyong 2025 windows by at least another year, if Win11 adoption
turns out to be as sluggish as it was with Win7.

I suspect Microsoft decision regarding TMP 2.0 might have been also influenced by the unique pickle they have found themselves in with Windows 10.
With housing crisis erasing people's savings and covid a few short years later robbing many of the same people of their jobs, people held on to older hardware much longer than they typically had in the past. Supporting that many varied chipsets and cpu generations is not a small feat, and TMP 2.0 seems like easy way out from architecture standpoint.
 
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lordmogul

Distinguished
Jun 14, 2014
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Will you still be using the system you built 5 years ago?
I'm actually using a machine I build 8 years ago as my main rig and have another one that is 12 years old. And both still do pretty much everything perfectly fine besides gaming. There is an upgrade planned later this year, but looking back I guess that machine will also run for the next 6+ years. And yes, the only reason for that upgrade are demanding games of 2020 later. All the games I play that came out before that still run adequate on it.
I assume I'm not part of a tiny minority by keeping parts in use after the 2 year warranty runs out. In fact, quite the opposite actually.
 

Colif

Win 10 Master
Moderator
people held on to older hardware much longer than they typically had in the past. Supporting that many varied chipsets and cpu generations is not a small feat, and TMP 2.0 seems like easy way out from architecture standpoint.
MS aren't the main ones not wanting to support old hardware, its the makers who (up until win 11) were more likely to stop supporting their hardware before windows stops. Win 10 was made to gather all the users from 7 & 8 into one easier to deal with package but it meant they had people on XP/Vista age PC along for the ride as well, since 7 had gathered a lot of them.

So you have this huge swathe of hardware and the makers are going... we don't want this. They also expect people to buy new stuff and not use it for ever. They don't want to keep supporting things that don't make them any more money now. So TPM could be more than just MS saying stop. Its time to get new things.

MS had been telling OEM for last few years they wanted TPM in win 10 PC, but no, its all MS fault for insisting now.

Versions of windows that exclude all users is not new. Win 8 was an example. You can't expect to keep getting newer OS on older hardware, there comes a time you stop and either just use the old one or buy a new PC. That is not new. I did it just before 10 was released, swapped from a PC that had started on Vista and ended on 7. PC aren't like cars, the exterior isn't the only change. They getting better all the time so you need to go with flow.
 
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Bazzy 505

Proper
Jul 17, 2021
247
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MS aren't the main ones not wanting to support old hardware, its the makers who (up until win 11) were more likely to stop supporting their hardware before windows stops. Win 10 was made to gather all the users from 7 & 8 into one easier to deal with package but it meant they had people on XP/Vista age PC along for the ride as well, since 7 had gathered a lot of them.

So you have this huge swathe of hardware and the makers are going... we don't want this. They also expect people to buy new stuff and not use it for ever. They don't want to keep supporting things that don't make them any more money now. So TPM could be more than just MS saying stop. Its time to get new things.

MS had been telling OEM for last few years they wanted TPM in win 10 PC, but no, its all MS fault for insisting now.

Versions of windows that exclude all users is not new. Win 8 was an example. You can't expect to keep getting newer OS on older hardware, there comes a time you stop and either just use the old one or buy a new PC. That is not new. I did it just before 10 was released, swapped from a PC that had started on Vista and ended on 7. PC aren't like cars, the exterior isn't the only change. They getting better all the time so you need to go with flow.
To be frank, you can't really blame OEMs for this either. Providing support for discontinued hardware costs a lot of money.
Many OEMs are in a situation where they have 100buck piece of hadware they made 5 bucks on 5 years ago. They just can't support it if they don't want to go out of business.
Of course there manufacturers on the very opposite side of fence. Let's say Cannon with their large office printers, where they offer driver support for 15+ old machines for even the most obscure OS-es most people hardly even remember anymore. But that also means you'll pay 3K+ for machine the bom for which is in 1K range.
 

Colif

Win 10 Master
Moderator
I am not blaming really, just explaining why it is. Very few things have life time warranties (apart from RAM and really expensive things) or are designed to work forever.

Win 10 is extending the life of some items that shouldn't go to the next step.

I suspect win 11 was originally planned for release last year but due to one of the things you mentioned it was pushed back and the last 2 builds of win 10 have been nothing more than bug fixes, likely what they will all be going forward. Probably add some new features in next few years. Might even finish them before going to next... maybe.
 

Math Geek

Champion
Ambassador
if the tpm requirement sticks with win 11, the oem's will make sure its there. they won't make new hardware that won't run windows. mobo's will have the slots and whatever else ms decides it needs to completely control your pc.

of course your old pre win 11 hardware won't be made with it in mind so may be missing some needed pieces.

but we don't and won't know any more until win 11 is officially released and what things look like years from now when win 10 is supposed to end.

personally i've never used win 10 and won't be using any further version of windows so long as they continue to build total surveillance into the OS.

but that's just me, many people don't care or don't mind ms watching everything they do. to each his own i guess.
 

Colif

Win 10 Master
Moderator
Biggest mistake I see being shared about TPM is you need the chips. As long as CPU can do fTPM the motherbaord just needs to support that.

I see it on videos and just start saying no. Not enough clarity, too much emotion.

ms watching.. just like google and almost everyone else online. MS weren't first to do it. I may not appreciate it but I am smart enough to know you can't really avoid it online.
 

Math Geek

Champion
Ambassador
i got win 11 working in a vm by enabling fTPM.

not tried a real install but have read it works for a normal install as well. hopefully that stays working which should give more folks a chance at older hardware working. i do have a tpm slot but no chip installed as it has never really been needed. but fTPM enabled seems to allow it to fit the tpm requirement so far.
 

Colif

Win 10 Master
Moderator
The tester they released for a weekend showed ftpm is all you need as I went from

to

just by enabling it in bios. NO other changes made.

So pretty sure it is all you need. Besides the right CPU and Secure boot (maybe). I pass tests but don't have secure boot on, I may need to turn it on to actually install but I am not concerned about that, its not for a few months now.
 
Biggest mistake I see being shared about TPM is you need the chips. As long as CPU can do fTPM the motherbaord just needs to support that.
There's also the gotcha that the boot drive must be GPT, which leads to people going "I have TPM enabled but it says I can't run Windows 11 :mad: "

I believe Microsoft wrote what they did as if system builders and the IT sector were their audience, and average Joe freaks out over things they probably haven't heard of before or brushed it off.
 

Colif

Win 10 Master
Moderator
This is the team of people who wrote the error you get when Installing windows 10, and your PC IS MBR and windows wants to use GPT, but doesn't say it in a way that is understandable by humans. Simpler terms being - Win 10 recognised your PC supports GPT (with a brief explanation of why you might want GPT) and Win 10 is designed to use it, please delete all partitions and click next.

So yes, the app wasn't very clear. They actually replaced it once during week with a slightly better version but it really needs to be more informative as to why PC fails.

After test fails it just dumps you back on page with requirements but it should at least highlight the ones you failed in.
 

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