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What Are Hall Effect Keyboard Switches, And How Do They Work? (Video)

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CKKwan

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Dec 29, 2010
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I think a LED switch will be better, cheaper and last even longer.

Besides, your keyboard needs to have the 'clicking' feel
 

Bibbily bong

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Physical switch or hall effect magnetic magic, I don't care, but I do know I like my keys clicky. Thus, a fan of cherry mx blue. I've used other switches and whilst I can type with linear press (Brown, red) I just don't feel as comfortable. I do a lot of writing, and I play a lot of games. I like the clicky keys
 

nikolajj

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Brown is now linear, black is :)
Brown has about the same bump as blue, but without the noise. This is what I prefer.
 

rardeva

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I would love to try this, i don't care about the clicky, I need something more sensitive with less effort, and without the noise, because I don't need it.
 

RedJaron

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Haven't talked about Hall effect and debounce since my paintball days. The cool thing about these actuations is you can actually use a second magnet in the key for the resistance. Two ways to do that: either pushing two like magnets together or pulling two opposite magnets apart. The first method is similar to a spring ( resistance increases the farther you push ), the other reverses it. Also since magnetism follows the inverse square law, the resistive force changes drastically after a few millimeters, while a spring is almost linear.

Ahhh, I still remember the magnetic trigger on my old E-Mag. It used the attractive method with two magnets holding the trigger forward. I used some extra magnets to stiffen it up against accidental firing. Trigger broke at about 2 lbs. Once it broke, the resistance fell to almost zero. Smoothest trigger I ever had. I'd like to see what a keyboard with the same actuation would feel like.

But I too prefer a little tactile feedback on my keystrokes, so I'd like to see some kind of "bump" incorporated into these.
 

bit_user

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When the primary rationale, in the article, was for longevity, I was wondering why not just use capacitive? But if the magnet is being used to provide physical resistance, that would be one reason.

Although, that calls into question the reliability figures... don't magnets weaken, with time & use?
 

RedJaron

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Um, yeah, if you go above the Curie temperature for the material. But at room temperature, we're talking hundreds, if not thousands, of years to see any change.
 
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