[SOLVED] What Can I Replace My GTX 1050TI With?

Jul 22, 2020
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I want to replace My Nvidia GTX 1050TI with something Newer from Nvidia, but I don't want to have to change the power supply. What are my Options? I couldn't figure out how to upload a file on to here so I just copied and pasted. I am not a Seasoned PC expert at all, I do know the Basics though. From what I can understand replacing a Graphics Card mainly depends on the PC's Power Supply. I have no Idea what my power supply even is? The Information below is from a Diagnostic Program That Microsoft ran on my system awhile back to see if I qualified to be an Alpha Tester on an upcoming Simulation, I cannot find anything about power supply in it. Any help at all would be Greatly Appreciated!!!
Thanks.
The following is some of my system information.

-<DxDiag>

-<SystemInformation>

<Time>6/8/2020, 11:28:51</Time>

<MachineName>DESKTOP-O1H0A7G</MachineName>

<MachineId>{4C8284F6-A906-4C56-8FF5-D31C52B46E1C}</MachineId>

<OperatingSystem>Windows 10 Home 64-bit (10.0, Build 18363) (18362.19h1_release.190318-1202)</OperatingSystem>

<Language>English (Regional Setting: English)</Language>

<SystemManufacturer>Acer</SystemManufacturer>

<SystemModel>Nitro N50-600</SystemModel>

<BIOS>R01-A3</BIOS>

<FirmwareType>UEFI</FirmwareType>

<Processor>Intel(R) Core(TM) i5-8400 CPU @ 2.80GHz (6 CPUs), ~2.8GHz</Processor>

<Memory>8192MB RAM</Memory>

<AvaliableOSMem>8118MB RAM</AvaliableOSMem>

<PageFile>5042MB used, 14563MB available</PageFile>

<WindowsDir>C:\WINDOWS</WindowsDir>

<DirectXVersion>DirectX 12</DirectXVersion>

<DXSetupParameters>Not found</DXSetupParameters>

<UserDPISettings>96 DPI (100 percent)</UserDPISettings>

<SystemDPISettings>96 DPI (100 percent)</SystemDPISettings>

<DWMDPIScaling>Disabled</DWMDPIScaling>

<DxDiagVersion>10.00.18362.0387</DxDiagVersion>

<DxDiagUnicode>1</DxDiagUnicode>

<DxDiag64Bit>1</DxDiag64Bit>

<Miracast>Available, with HDCP</Miracast>

<MSHybrid>Not Supported</MSHybrid>

<DirectXDatabaseVersion>Unknown</DirectXDatabaseVersion>


-<DisplayDevice>

<CardName>NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1050 Ti</CardName>

<Manufacturer>NVIDIA</Manufacturer>

<ChipType>GeForce GTX 1050 Ti</ChipType>

<DACType>Integrated RAMDAC</DACType>

<DeviceType>Full Device (POST)</DeviceType>

<DeviceKey>Enum\PCI\VEN_10DE&DEV_1C82&SUBSYS_3454174B&REV_A1</DeviceKey>

<DeviceStatus>0180200A [DN_DRIVER_LOADED|DN_STARTED|DN_DISABLEABLE|DN_NT_ENUMERATOR|DN_NT_DRIVER] </DeviceStatus>

<DeviceProblemCode>No Problem</DeviceProblemCode>

<DriverProblemCode>Unknown</DriverProblemCode>

<DisplayMemory>8088 MB</DisplayMemory>

<DedicatedMemory>4029 MB</DedicatedMemory>

<SharedMemory>4059 MB</SharedMemory>

<CurrentMode>1920 x 1080 (32 bit) (60Hz)</CurrentMode>
 

RTX 2080

Upstanding
Jun 8, 2020
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I think that it's best to treat that list of compatible products as a list of stuff known to work by that particular website at the time of publication, rather than as a list of the only stuff that will work.

I find it to be basically pointless to compare clock speeds on different versions of the same GPU. Regardless of which GPU you are using, it'll boost up to a certain point and then throttle back as it needs to as the card heats up. Thus, the greatest difference in most cards will lie in the ability of the cooling system to remove heat and allow the card to boost higher. Overclocking makes the differences even less significant as it allows most cards to overclock to similar levels irregardless of the board partner being utilized. There are exceptions to this, but that's mostly for cards on the high end like the 2080 Ti.

To answer your question about cooling fans, there are three main ways of improving the cooling system on a GPU; make the cooler thicker (how many slots the GPU takes up), make the cooler longer (how long the GPU is front to back) and to increase the number of fans blowing air through the cooler (1, 2 and 3 fan designs). Everything else being the same, twin-fan GPUs cool better than single fan GPUs, which is good for keeping temperatures down (which keeps your boost clocks up) and allows the two fans to spin slower than a single fan would have to which reduces fan noise in your case when the GPU is under load.

If you have all the space in the world in your case, then the bigger the cooler the better, but most people don't have room for that, so if they are not choosing the card based on price, they look for the best cooler that will fit their system.

I watched a little bit of the video that describes your PC case and a few things stood out to me:

1.) The GPU shown in there has an 8-pin power cable plugged into it, which tells me that your PC does in fact have an 8-pin cable to plug into a RTX 2060 should you decide to buy one. A 500 watt power supply should be enough to power a RTX 2060.

2.) You have room for a 3-slot GPU in your tower (the one shown in the video is a two slot, but there is an unused slot underneath.)

3.) There is not a whole lot of space in the case as far as GPU length is concerned.

4.) The case does not seem to come with a fan that blows hot air out of the case (maybe yours does, but the one in the video doesn't).

All this leads me to think that the best version of the RTX 2060 for your purposes would be the EVGA Geforce RTX 2060 XC Gaming card, the one with a single fan that costs $319 on the Nvidia website. Allow me to explain why:

Your case doesn't seem to have room for long GPUs and its hard to tell exactly how long a GPU it will fit, so in your situation a shorter, single-fan GPU will ensure the best fit. The problem with that though is that single fan GPUs run hotter and thus slower than twin-fan GPUs. For that reason I would not recommend the ASUS Phoenix card as reading reviews confirmed to me that it runs hot.

The EVGA RTX 2060 XC Gaming card however has a 3-slot cooler, which means that even though its is a short, single fan card, it has a very thick cooler that makes up the difference in cooling capacity. Reviews for this card confirm that it runs cool and quiet with no disadvantage compared to longer, twin fan cards. Your case has room for a short, three-slot card, so it seems perfect for you.

One last thing I would recommend is that if your case did not come with a fan for blowing hot air outside the case, you should get one installed; you want to make sure that your GPU isn't trying to cool itself off with its own heat because hot air isn't getting out of the case.
 
Reactions: TJS1986
Should be this one:
https://www.acer.com/ac/en/US/content/model/DG.E0HAA.022

500W power supply installed

should be able to power nearly all GPUs out there, depends on your budget
for mid gaming I would get a GTX1660super or if you can afford more, then a RTX2070

AMD RX5700XT would be fine as well, but since the latest issues of many users, I wouldn´t recommend it.
It can work great, but it can be a pain

you will have to measure the space for a new GPU as well

View: https://youtu.be/s9iXcXy_yHc?t=192
 
Reactions: TJS1986
Jul 22, 2020
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The only current generation Nvidia card that will drop in just as easily as your GTX 1050 Ti is a GTX 1650. It is the successor to the 1050/1050 Ti and has the same 75 watt TDP, which means no power supply issues and no supplemental power connectors.

As you can see on userbenchmark right here, the 1650 is somewhere between 17 - 30% more powerful than your 1050 Ti depending on what you use it for.

What do you use your GPU for and what improvement are you hoping to see?
[/QUOTE
THANK YOU!
I use it for Flight Simulators, Specifically X-Plane 11 and am Getting ready for Microsoft Flight Simulator 2020 which releases August 18th. The 1050TI Is enough to meet the Recommended Specifications but What I'm mainly looking for Is Higher FPS And Smoother Graphic Transitions.
 

RTX 2080

Upstanding
Jun 8, 2020
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If you want to run MS Flight simulator 2020 at 1080p 60 fps stable with everything turned up, I'd recommend a RTX 2060 Super. That card will require an 8 pin power connector, but your PSU looks capable enough.

If you can't afford the super, the regular 2060 should be your next best option.

I think the 1650 will leave you wanting for more when it comes to running MS Flight Simulator 2020.
 
Reactions: TJS1986
Jul 22, 2020
39
3
35
0
Should be this one:
https://www.acer.com/ac/en/US/content/model/DG.E0HAA.022

500W power supply installed

should be able to power nearly all GPUs out there, depends on your budget
for mid gaming I would get a GTX1660super or if you can afford more, then a RTX2070

AMD RX5700XT would be fine as well, but since the latest issues of many users, I wouldn´t recommend it.
It can work great, but it can be a pain

you will have to measure the space for a new GPU as well

View: https://youtu.be/s9iXcXy_yHc?t=192
Thank You!
Yes, That is the exact model.
 
Jul 22, 2020
39
3
35
0
If you want to run MS Flight simulator 2020 at 1080p 60 fps stable with everything turned up, I'd recommend a RTX 2060 Super. That card will require an 8 pin power connector, but your PSU looks capable enough.

If you can't afford the super, the regular 2060 should be your next best option.

I think the 1650 will leave you wanting for more when it comes to running MS Flight Simulator 2020.
So , I would need to get the correct power connector, but my Power Supply is Ok?
 

RTX 2080

Upstanding
Jun 8, 2020
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8 pin power connectors all look the same, but internally they are configured differently depending on the PSU. Thus, it is never recommended to use a cable that didn't come with your PSU; bad things can happen.

Check inside your case to see if your power supply has an 8 pin power cable included. If it does, you're good. If it doesn't, your options are limited to a) buying a GTX 1650 (because it needs no power connector) or b) buying a new power supply.
 
Reactions: TJS1986
Jul 22, 2020
39
3
35
0
8 pin power connectors all look the same, but internally they are configured differently depending on the PSU. Thus, it is never recommended to use a cable that didn't come with your PSU; bad things can happen.

Check inside your case to see if your power supply has an 8 pin power cable included. If it does, you're good. If it doesn't, your options are limited to a) buying a GTX 1650 (because it needs no power connector) or b) buying a new power supply.
Will Do.
Thanks A lot, I Appreciate it!!
 
Jul 22, 2020
39
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Sure thing!
Would a GTX 1660TI work in my PC? According to this site https://www.userbenchmark.com/System/Acer-Nitro-N50-600/88666 It will. I just wanted your opinion before I order it because it looks a bit longer that the 1050Ti? The 1650 (as you mentioned) is on this list, as well as the 1060 6GB. All perform a good deal better than my current card with the 1660TI being the best.
If you can check out that site really quick and get back to me I would really appreciate it!
Thanks.
 

RTX 2080

Upstanding
Jun 8, 2020
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The 1660 Ti should work, but you should know that the 1660 super can be had for $40 less and has almost the exact same performance, check it out: Link

If you are willing to pay 1660 Ti money, you should spend $20 more than the 1660 Ti and get an EVGA 2060 KO instead (I own this exact card) for a 15% boost in performance: Link

Your case should fit both the single and twin fan versions of any of these three cards although I doubt the triple fan versions will fit.
 
Last edited:
Reactions: TJS1986
Jul 22, 2020
39
3
35
0
The 1660 Ti should work, but you should know that the 1660 super can be had for $40 less and has almost the exact same performance, check it out: Link

If you are willing to pay 1660 Ti money, you should spend $20 more than the 1660 Ti and get an EVGA 2060 KO instead (I own this exact card) for a 15% boost in performance: Link The RTX 2060 also comes with ray tracing hardware which is a plus for you seeing as how MS flight simulator 2020 is going to support ray tracing.

Your case should fit both the single and twin fan versions of any of these three cards although I doubt the triple fan versions will fit.
I would absolutely be willing to spend $20 more for a 2060, I just didn't consider it because it wasn't on the list of Compatible components for my Acer Nitro N50-600 according to this site https://www.userbenchmark.com/System/Acer-Nitro-N50-600/88666 , the same one I linked In my previous post.
I just looked on the Nvidia Site and I'm pretty sure one of the top two are what you are speaking of:
EVGA GEFORCE RTX 2060 KO GAMING
  • Cooling System: Dual Fan
  • Boost Clock Speed: 1680 MHz
  • GPU Memory Size: 6 GB
$309.99

EVGA GEFORCE RTX 2060 KO ULTRA GAMING
  • Cooling System: Dual Fan
  • Boost Clock Speed: 1755 MHz
  • GPU Memory Size: 6 GB
$329.99

There were also these single fan versions:

EVGA GEFORCE RTX 2060 XC GAMING - 6 GO GDDR6 - HDMI/DISPLAYPORT/DVI - PCI EXPRESS (NVIDIA GEFORCE RTX 2060)
  • Cooling System: Active
  • Boost Clock Speed: 1755 MHz
  • GPU Memory Size: 6 GB
$319.99

EVGA GEFORCE RTX 2060 XC BLACK GAMING GRAPHICS CARD
  • Cooling System: Active
  • Boost Clock Speed: 1680 MHz
  • GPU Memory Size: 6 GB
$340.99

EVGA GEFORCE RTX 2060 GAMING, 06G-P4-2060-KR, 6GB GDDR6, HDB FAN
  • Cooling System: Active
  • Boost Clock Speed: 1680 MHz
  • GPU Memory Size: 6 GB
$344.99

The cheaper price of the first single fan model has me a bit confused as it has a higher clock speed than the other two?
Also, is the benefit of having a Twin Fan just better cooling?
Finally will my PC w/500 Watt PSU be able to power these? And I know from your previous Posts that these require a Power Connector, specifically an 8 Pin Power Cable. I have not opened my case yet as i wanted to ask if I could just look up that info instead of opening my case? The Technical side of the PC world is still very new to me but thanks to people like yourself i am learning quickly!


I really appreciate you taking the time to answer my questions and help me out with this, THANK YOU!!!
 

RTX 2080

Upstanding
Jun 8, 2020
434
90
340
19
I think that it's best to treat that list of compatible products as a list of stuff known to work by that particular website at the time of publication, rather than as a list of the only stuff that will work.

I find it to be basically pointless to compare clock speeds on different versions of the same GPU. Regardless of which GPU you are using, it'll boost up to a certain point and then throttle back as it needs to as the card heats up. Thus, the greatest difference in most cards will lie in the ability of the cooling system to remove heat and allow the card to boost higher. Overclocking makes the differences even less significant as it allows most cards to overclock to similar levels irregardless of the board partner being utilized. There are exceptions to this, but that's mostly for cards on the high end like the 2080 Ti.

To answer your question about cooling fans, there are three main ways of improving the cooling system on a GPU; make the cooler thicker (how many slots the GPU takes up), make the cooler longer (how long the GPU is front to back) and to increase the number of fans blowing air through the cooler (1, 2 and 3 fan designs). Everything else being the same, twin-fan GPUs cool better than single fan GPUs, which is good for keeping temperatures down (which keeps your boost clocks up) and allows the two fans to spin slower than a single fan would have to which reduces fan noise in your case when the GPU is under load.

If you have all the space in the world in your case, then the bigger the cooler the better, but most people don't have room for that, so if they are not choosing the card based on price, they look for the best cooler that will fit their system.

I watched a little bit of the video that describes your PC case and a few things stood out to me:

1.) The GPU shown in there has an 8-pin power cable plugged into it, which tells me that your PC does in fact have an 8-pin cable to plug into a RTX 2060 should you decide to buy one. A 500 watt power supply should be enough to power a RTX 2060.

2.) You have room for a 3-slot GPU in your tower (the one shown in the video is a two slot, but there is an unused slot underneath.)

3.) There is not a whole lot of space in the case as far as GPU length is concerned.

4.) The case does not seem to come with a fan that blows hot air out of the case (maybe yours does, but the one in the video doesn't).

All this leads me to think that the best version of the RTX 2060 for your purposes would be the EVGA Geforce RTX 2060 XC Gaming card, the one with a single fan that costs $319 on the Nvidia website. Allow me to explain why:

Your case doesn't seem to have room for long GPUs and its hard to tell exactly how long a GPU it will fit, so in your situation a shorter, single-fan GPU will ensure the best fit. The problem with that though is that single fan GPUs run hotter and thus slower than twin-fan GPUs. For that reason I would not recommend the ASUS Phoenix card as reading reviews confirmed to me that it runs hot.

The EVGA RTX 2060 XC Gaming card however has a 3-slot cooler, which means that even though its is a short, single fan card, it has a very thick cooler that makes up the difference in cooling capacity. Reviews for this card confirm that it runs cool and quiet with no disadvantage compared to longer, twin fan cards. Your case has room for a short, three-slot card, so it seems perfect for you.

One last thing I would recommend is that if your case did not come with a fan for blowing hot air outside the case, you should get one installed; you want to make sure that your GPU isn't trying to cool itself off with its own heat because hot air isn't getting out of the case.
 
Reactions: TJS1986
Jul 22, 2020
39
3
35
0
Thank you so much for your reply! I do have a fan blowing the hot air out. I too just now watched that video and I have the same case with the differences being an Nvidia 1050TI instead of an AMD Card and I also have an SSD, plus the fan blowing out the hot air. Thanks to your reply i'm going to go ahead and order that card now as it seems the most appropriate for my needs and what my PC will fit and run.
Thank you very much for your reply's over the last few days as you have not only answered my question and allowed me to make a decision, but I have also gained further much needed knowledge about the inner workings of PC's and Specifically GPU's!
 

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