[SOLVED] What do you think would be a good GPU for my build?

Hi,so just want to make this clear,i probably wont upgrade my GPU for a year or 2,but i wanted to hear your ideas on which one would be good.
And YES i will replace my psu for it.
So this is just a idea,but i would really love to have the legendary gtx 1080 ti .
I play at 1080p and i dont plan to move away from it,so i dont need (and cant afford) a new card.
I bought this R9 380 4GB in december 2019,it brought my old i3 3240 system back to life.
But as time goes on the poor little R9 will have to go,and i dont plan to sell it.Im going to either put it on a shelf or just keep it in my house,i wouldnt have the heart to sell it.Plus i would probably get 30e max at the time i would sell it. (its 50e now)
So i personally think the 1080Ti would be the perfect card to pair with my i3.
I know it can play anything at any settings at 60fps on 1080p,and i want it to be future proof as much as possible,since i like to use the max out of my components as possible.
In a year or 2,what do you think it would cost on the used market?
Before this GPU chaos,you could find a pretty respectable EVGA 1080ti for around 250-300euros,would it drop to 200e or possibly below in 2 years?
Also i saw that there are a few hybrid models of the card,ofcourse now they are 400e now,but i woud LOVE LOVE LOVE to have such a unique and cool gpu with a radiator in it (i mean who wouldnt xD).
Thanks in advance.
 
You will definitely want to consider newer hardware as well when you go to buy. Already, the 3060 Ti can be around 20-25% faster than a 1080 Ti in some games, and if it were not for the shortages, you would be able to find some models starting at around $400 USD. The 3060 (non-Ti) will likely perform roughly on a similar level as the 1080 Ti (plus with support for newer tech like raytracing and DLSS), and was supposed to have an MSRP of $330, though it will likely be quite a while before they will be available anywhere near that price.

While it's hard to say what graphics card pricing might be like in a couple years, it wouldn't be surprising to see that level of performance available on new cards in the $200-250 range, that may offer new features and be even more efficient. So while it might be possible to find a 1080 Ti for around $200 by that point, it might be worth paying a little more for a new card that draws less power, puts out less heat, and likely performs better in newer games, especially if raytraced lighting effects become the standard for "ultra" graphics settings. And of course, it will be new hardware with a fresh warranty, providing you with some assurance that you can get the card replaced if it fails within the first 2-3 years. And on the topic of reliability, I'm not sure how much faith I would have in a hybrid 1080 Ti with an AIO cooler at that point. It might be around 5 years old by then, and AIOs are not really known for their long-term reliability.
 
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Feb 9, 2021
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The R9 390 Is a good card despite approaching the old-age of 6 years.

I wouldn't pair a high-end graphics card with a dual-core chip like the 3240, If you have the budget look for a quad-core replacement processor with the same socket type.

The 1080Ti is an upper mid-range graphics card, albeit more expensive than the 390. Don't pair higher-end hardware with a cheap and older processor, more than likely the outcome leads to a bigger bottleneck holding back the 1080Ti.
 
The R9 390 Is a good card despite approaching the old-age of 6 years.

I wouldn't pair a high-end graphics card with a dual-core chip like the 3240, If you have the budget look for a quad-core replacement processor with the same socket type.

The 1080Ti is an upper mid-range graphics card, albeit more expensive than the 390. Don't pair higher-end hardware with a cheap and older processor, more than likely the outcome leads to a bigger bottleneck holding back the 1080Ti.
Thought i didnt have to mention it,but if you look in my signature,you can see the configuration i recently upgraded to.
 

rezaka16

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The 1080 TI is really good, I have an i3 10100F, basically equivalent to what you have. Although I fear that there will still be bottlenecking between the GPU and CPU? Not quite sure, but I think so. Perhaps a GTX 1070?
 

RTX 2080

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If you're planning on upgrading in about two years, by that point in time there will be a Nvidia 40xx available and the 1080 Ti will be three (!) generations old. We are already starting to see drop-offs in the performance hierarchy for pascal GPUs vs. Turing GPUs in some newer games, and this situation will only get worse as Nvidia spends less time optimizing their drivers for hardware that came out in 2016-2017. Because of this (and seeing how unpopular a GPU it has been) a RTX 2080 will probably cost similar to a 1080 Ti in 2 years and yet provide better performance in many instances (not even counting support for DLSS). Heck, seeing as how the 3060 Ti provides 2080 Super performance right now, buying one used for $300 in two years would probably be a much better long-term investment: it'll play newer games much better with it's improved architecture, it supports RTX & DLSS, and it'll draw a lot less power (and be less likely to **** the bed due to old age).
 
Reactions: Master Djoza
If you're planning on upgrading in about two years, by that point in time there will be a Nvidia 40xx available and the 1080 Ti will be three (!) generations old. We are already starting to see drop-offs in the performance hierarchy for pascal GPUs vs. Turing GPUs in some newer games, and this situation will only get worse as Nvidia spends less time optimizing their drivers for hardware that came out in 2016-2017. Because of this (and seeing how unpopular a GPU it has been) a RTX 2080 will probably cost similar to a 1080 Ti in 2 years and yet provide better performance in many instances (not even counting support for DLSS). Heck, seeing as how the 3060 Ti provides 2080 Super performance right now, buying one used for $300 in two years would probably be a much better long-term investment: it'll play newer games much better with it's improved architecture, it supports RTX & DLSS, and it'll draw a lot less power (and be less likely to **** the bed due to old age).
Thanks,currently the 2080 is 600e,so i will see and follow its price.
 

RTX 2080

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Thanks,currently the 2080 is 600e,so i will see and follow its price.
Yeah, that's just right now due to supply issues and people paying whatever they can to buy a real GPU; trust me, when supply evens out and (someday) we can all buy a new RTX 3060 Ti for it's $400 list price, there will be no RTX 2080s being listed for sale on eBay for $600. It'll go down.
 
Reactions: Master Djoza
Yeah, that's just right now due to supply issues and people paying whatever they can to buy a real GPU; trust me, when supply evens out and (someday) we can all buy a new RTX 3060 Ti for it's $400 list price, there will be no RTX 2080s being listed for sale on eBay for $600. It'll go down.
I will be patient,as long as my R9 380 4gb doesnt die by then (which i certanly hope it wont) i can accept its abilities.
Thx for suggestions.
 

RTX 2080

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I will be patient,as long as my R9 380 4gb doesnt die by then (which i certanly hope it wont) i can accept its abilities.
Thx for suggestions.
Sure thing. It's funny seeing you asking for GPU advice when so often I see you as the one usually giving it.

And FYI, I love the last line about your chieftec PSU in your signature; I can almost hear everyone typing telling you to replace it right now. I actually had a chieftec PSU in my first PC back in the day; it seemed surprisingly decent.
 
Sure thing. It's funny seeing you asking for GPU advice when so often I see you as the one usually giving it.

And FYI, I love the last line about your chieftec PSU in your signature; I can almost hear everyone typing telling you to replace it right now. I actually had a chieftec PSU in my first PC back in the day; it seemed surprisingly decent.
I want recommendations,rather than advice's,there are many GPU's and its hard choosing one.
I remember i could've gotten a 390X for 20$ more but i got the 380 since i didnt know the difference back then.
I've had 3 convo's on this forum with people telling me to replace my psu,it was a real pain in the a**...
Thx again for suggestions.
 
You will definitely want to consider newer hardware as well when you go to buy. Already, the 3060 Ti can be around 20-25% faster than a 1080 Ti in some games, and if it were not for the shortages, you would be able to find some models starting at around $400 USD. The 3060 (non-Ti) will likely perform roughly on a similar level as the 1080 Ti (plus with support for newer tech like raytracing and DLSS), and was supposed to have an MSRP of $330, though it will likely be quite a while before they will be available anywhere near that price.

While it's hard to say what graphics card pricing might be like in a couple years, it wouldn't be surprising to see that level of performance available on new cards in the $200-250 range, that may offer new features and be even more efficient. So while it might be possible to find a 1080 Ti for around $200 by that point, it might be worth paying a little more for a new card that draws less power, puts out less heat, and likely performs better in newer games, especially if raytraced lighting effects become the standard for "ultra" graphics settings. And of course, it will be new hardware with a fresh warranty, providing you with some assurance that you can get the card replaced if it fails within the first 2-3 years. And on the topic of reliability, I'm not sure how much faith I would have in a hybrid 1080 Ti with an AIO cooler at that point. It might be around 5 years old by then, and AIOs are not really known for their long-term reliability.
 
Reactions: Master Djoza
You will definitely want to consider newer hardware as well when you go to buy. Already, the 3060 Ti tends to be around 20-25% faster than a 1080 Ti, and if it were not for the shortages, you would be able to find some models starting at around $400 USD. The 3060 (non-Ti) will likely perform roughly on a similar level as the 1080 Ti (plus with support for newer tech like raytracing and DLSS), and was supposed to have an MSRP of $330, though it will likely be quite a while before they will be available anywhere near that price.

While it's hard to say what graphics card pricing might be like in a couple years, it wouldn't be surprising to see that level of performance available on new cards in the $200-250 range, that may offer new features and be even more efficient. So while it might be possible to find a 1080 Ti for around $200 by that point, it might be worth paying a little more for a new card that draws less power, puts out less heat, and likely performs better in newer games, especially if raytraced lighting effects become the standard for "ultra" graphics settings. And of course, it will be new hardware with a fresh warranty, providing you with some assurance that you can get the card replaced if it fails within the first 2-3 years. And on the topic of reliability, I'm not sure how much faith I would have in a hybrid 1080 Ti with an AIO cooler at that point. It might be around 5 years old by then, and AIOs are not really known for their long-term reliability.
Good point for the AIO's,didnt even think of that.
I am convinced that i will never be able to afford high end new hardware in my country,only on the used market unfortunately,everything in my country is like 100$ more than in other countries.Thanks for the advice,i will see what the market offers by then.
 

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