What does "\\" mean in typing a path?

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I forgot to add to the description... By server I meant one that's the core of a Local Network... where every network location or computer name, is represented by a dual backslash, followed by the computer name.
That's just how Windows addresses network attached computers. There's no real technical reason for it.

It's like there's no real technical reason why UNIX/Linux paths start with "/"

Lutfij

Titan
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You should be seeing one backslash, in the address bar, not two after the drive letter. The first backslash after the drive letter and colon designate that you're entering that drive. Each single backslash following that means you're entering into a folder located on that drive.
 

box o rocks

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You should be seeing one backslash, in the address bar, not two after the drive letter. The first backslash after the drive letter and colon designate that you're entering that drive. Each single backslash following that means you're entering into a folder located on that drive.
So the double backslash likely was a typo?
 
May 15, 2023
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@box o rocks In file paths, the double backslash "\\" is used to represent a single backslash "\". It's an escape sequence to avoid conflicts with special characters. So, "C:\\Documents\\Steam\\..." represents the path "C:\Documents\Steam\...".
 
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ajohnson30

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The only other time you would see the double-backslash is to start off a unc path, which would not include a drive letter, but a computer or machine name (server prefix, like Chicano said), like \\computername\folderpath1\subfolderpath2\filename.ext
 
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The only other time you would see the double-backslash is to start off a unc path, which would not include a drive letter, but a computer or machine name (server prefix, like Chicano said), like \\computername\folderpath1\subfolderpath2\filename.ext
You're right... I forgot to add to the description... By server, I meant one that's the core of a Local Network... where every network location or computer name, is represented by a dual backslash, followed by the computer name.
 
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I forgot to add to the description... By server I meant one that's the core of a Local Network... where every network location or computer name, is represented by a dual backslash, followed by the computer name.
That's just how Windows addresses network attached computers. There's no real technical reason for it.

It's like there's no real technical reason why UNIX/Linux paths start with "/"
 
  • Like
Reactions: Chicano
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