Question What does this keyboard function do?

Hot___

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I have a Marvo KG760 Keyboard and it has a function that I can t figure out what it does. According to the instructions manual: "Pentru selectarea ratei de transmisie (normal sau rapid) apasati tastele FN + Q " which translates to "For selection of [transmission/ input*] rate (normal or fast) press the keys FN+Q". The text on the Q key is like this: "Q / 80%"
Here is a video that I recorded in CS:GO with this function on: video

*I don't know the exact translate of this because I don't know what it refers to.

Edit: Here is another video from a "Keyboard testing website" video . When I activate the function you can see that when I keep pressing a key it like presses-skips
continuously
 
Last edited:

Ralston18

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Not really able to see the impact per se via your videos.

However, my thought is that the FN + Q allows you to set the repeat rate when the Q key is held down.

What other % options are available?

Any manual references to doing FN + "key" for all keys or just specific gaming movement keys?

Go into WIN + I > Ease of Access > Keyboard > Filter keys.

Turn on Filter keys.

Make a setting change. (Note what you change and what the original value was - just in case you need to reverse the change.)

Next go back to the FN + Q options, check the value (%) and make a change there.

Determine if the change also changes your "Filter key" settings and vice versa.
 

Hot___

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Not really able to see the impact per se via your videos.

However, my thought is that the FN + Q allows you to set the repeat rate when the Q key is held down.

What other % options are available?

Any manual references to doing FN + "key" for all keys or just specific gaming movement keys?

Go into WIN + I > Ease of Access > Keyboard > Filter keys.

Turn on Filter keys.

Make a setting change. (Note what you change and what the original value was - just in case you need to reverse the change.)

Next go back to the FN + Q options, check the value (%) and make a change there.

Determine if the change also changes your "Filter key" settings and vice versa.
The keyboard has no driver so I cannot change the % .
There are a set of functions in the manual: FN+W, FN+Win, FN+[+-]...
"FN + Q allows you to set the repeat rate" I think you are right here. It seems that if I activate this function and keep pressing a key it is"spamming" faster than without the function.
Maybe this key is for games where like instead of having to spam a key manually, you can just keep pressing it and the keyboard will do it for you.
 

Ralston18

Titan
Moderator
Try this:

WIN + R

In the Open field/box type "main.cpl @1 " (without quotes)

A keyboard properties window should open.

Curious if your keyboard FN options will appear/move the rate indicators

Either actively (the rate indicators move while you apply FN) or passively (you note the original rate setting(s) then close the window, go to your keyboards FN feature, "change" what you can. then reopen the keyboard properties window to determine if the rate changed.

Overall objective is to find a way to demonstrate or show what FN + Q is indeed actually doing. And how you can apply that result thereafter.
 

Hot___

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Dec 2, 2015
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Try this:

WIN + R

In the Open field/box type "main.cpl @1 " (without quotes)

A keyboard properties window should open.

Curious if your keyboard FN options will appear/move the rate indicators

Either actively (the rate indicators move while you apply FN) or passively (you note the original rate setting(s) then close the window, go to your keyboards FN feature, "change" what you can. then reopen the keyboard properties window to determine if the rate changed.

Overall objective is to find a way to demonstrate or show what FN + Q is indeed actually doing. And how you can apply that result thereafter.
It does not seem to change something in the keyboard properties.
 

Ralston18

Titan
Moderator
Not sure about how much you wish to delve into the matter.

However, I googling about thinking and looking for ways to measure key repeat rates when a key is held down.

Came across this website:

http://stereopsis.com/keyrepeat/

Anyway, being generally interested in such things I got to thinking about Powershell and if it could be used to control the keyboard repeat rate.

Appears so;

Here is the cmdlet to get the rate:

Get-itemproperty "HKCU:\Control Panel\Keyboard\" -name KeyboardSpeed

My keyboard results:

PS C:\Users\XXXX> Get-itemproperty "HKCU:\Control Panel\Keyboard\" -name KeyboardSpeed

KeyboardSpeed : 20
PSPath : Microsoft.PowerShell.Core\Registry::HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Control Panel\Keyboard\
PSParentPath : Microsoft.PowerShell.Core\Registry::HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Control Panel
PSChildName : Keyboard
PSDrive : HKCU
PSProvider : Microsoft.PowerShell.Core\Registry

Again, if you are curious you could open Powershell and run the Get and then work with FN+Q to watch if the KeyboardSpeed changes by running the Get again.

Note - do not let the above Registry data tempt you into tinkering with the Registry. Not likely to end well....
 

Hot___

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Not sure about how much you wish to delve into the matter.

However, I googling about thinking and looking for ways to measure key repeat rates when a key is held down.

Came across this website:

http://stereopsis.com/keyrepeat/

Anyway, being generally interested in such things I got to thinking about Powershell and if it could be used to control the keyboard repeat rate.

Appears so;

Here is the cmdlet to get the rate:

Get-itemproperty "HKCU:\Control Panel\Keyboard\" -name KeyboardSpeed

My keyboard results:

PS C:\Users\XXXX> Get-itemproperty "HKCU:\Control Panel\Keyboard\" -name KeyboardSpeed

KeyboardSpeed : 20
PSPath : Microsoft.PowerShell.Core\Registry::HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Control Panel\Keyboard\
PSParentPath : Microsoft.PowerShell.Core\Registry::HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Control Panel
PSChildName : Keyboard
PSDrive : HKCU
PSProvider : Microsoft.PowerShell.Core\Registry

Again, if you are curious you could open Powershell and run the Get and then work with FN+Q to watch if the KeyboardSpeed changes by running the Get again.

Note - do not let the above Registry data tempt you into tinkering with the Registry. Not likely to end well....
I've used the site and the key repeat rate is at 33ms normally, but when I activate the FN+Q function it jumps to 16-20ms
In powershell it stays the same:

KeyboardSpeed : 31
PSPath : Microsoft.PowerShell.Core\Registry::HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Control Panel\Keyboard\
PSParentPath : Microsoft.PowerShell.Core\Registry::HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Control Panel
PSChildName : Keyboard
PSDrive : HKCU
PSProvider : Microsoft.PowerShell.Core\Registry
 

Ralston18

Titan
Moderator
So, if I follow correctly, the function speeds up the rate of the key presses.

Normal being 33, fast being 16-20.

So with FN+Q does your gaming character move faster with repetitive presses of the direction key or if the key is simply held down?

Hopefully you should be able to see a difference via direct viewing.
 

Hot___

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So, if I follow correctly, the function speeds up the rate of the key presses.

Normal being 33, fast being 16-20.

So with FN+Q does your gaming character move faster with repetitive presses of the direction key or if the key is simply held down?

Hopefully you should be able to see a difference via direct viewing.
I don't know how can this help me ingame. In csgo for example: video when I enable it and press a key, for example W to move forward it like... stutters , it acts like I keep pressing and releasing the key although I never let go of it.
 

Ralston18

Titan
Moderator
I really cannot see any performance differences in the video but that is likely due to intervening factors such as internet speeds to me, my network speeds, and my computer's performance settings.

------

Each key press may represent, for example , one step forward.

So to rapidly move forward you must rapidly keep pressing the key. One key press, one step.

The repeat function (by holding the key down) causes the keyboard drivers to behave as if you were doing individual key presses. Difference being one keypress-hold then results in multiple steps and at a rate corresponding to the repeat rate of keypress-hold.

Overall using keypress-hold is going to result in faster movement that repeated key presses for one step per key press. Especially as hands/fingers tire during long game play sessions.

It may well be that FN+Q combination does that but there is a limit to how fast the key presses, either manually or repetitively result in character speed of movement. Your system simply cannot go that fast and stutters occur.

Saturating, buffering....

Your keyboard may have stepped repeat rates 20, 40, 60, 80, 100. I do not know.

Multiple factors involved, the responsiveness of key board keys, the keyboard drivers, the game settings, etc....

So with a keyboard of dubious (for lack of a better word) nature, likely poorly written drivers, and lacking documentation there may not be much that can be done.

I am starting to think that your post may garner more attention in PC Gaming.

Post the games that you play and we can move your post to another category.
 

Hot___

Honorable
Dec 2, 2015
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I really cannot see any performance differences in the video but that is likely due to intervening factors such as internet speeds to me, my network speeds, and my computer's performance settings.

------

Each key press may represent, for example , one step forward.

So to rapidly move forward you must rapidly keep pressing the key. One key press, one step.

The repeat function (by holding the key down) causes the keyboard drivers to behave as if you were doing individual key presses. Difference being one keypress-hold then results in multiple steps and at a rate corresponding to the repeat rate of keypress-hold.

Overall using keypress-hold is going to result in faster movement that repeated key presses for one step per key press. Especially as hands/fingers tire during long game play sessions.

It may well be that FN+Q combination does that but there is a limit to how fast the key presses, either manually or repetitively result in character speed of movement. Your system simply cannot go that fast and stutters occur.

Saturating, buffering....

Your keyboard may have stepped repeat rates 20, 40, 60, 80, 100. I do not know.

Multiple factors involved, the responsiveness of key board keys, the keyboard drivers, the game settings, etc....

So with a keyboard of dubious (for lack of a better word) nature, likely poorly written drivers, and lacking documentation there may not be much that can be done.

I am starting to think that your post may garner more attention in PC Gaming.

Post the games that you play and we can move your post to another category.
video
here is another test in gta v. Sorry for the audio, I was on discord and forgot that it also records the audio from discord.
"The repeat function (by holding the key down) causes the keyboard drivers to behave as if you were doing individual key presses" this is right I think.
As you can see in the video the characted does not walk when I keep W pressed down and does not run when I double press W - "So to rapidly move forward you must rapidly keep pressing the key. One key press, one step." If I press two keys at the same time, for example W and A the character moves normally( end of the video)
I think this works for games where you have to spam a key to do something, like attack.

I play mostly CS:GO and sometimes other games like GTA V, CIties Skylines, Assassin s Creed...
 

Ralston18

Titan
Moderator
Overall my sense is that there is an issue with the keyboard and/or keyboard drivers...

Not sure what else to suggest at this time.

I will move your thread to PC Gaming.

The thread has gotten a bit lengthy but hopefully others will still read through the posts and note some error of commission or omission on my part.

Good chance that some other gamer has experienced a similar issue and, one way or another, resolved the problem.
 

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