What graphics card I can use on my HP dx2400?

Apr 11, 2018
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Hi, I have got a HP dx2400 with a Core 2 Duo E4600 2.4GHz (800 MHz) processor and 4Gb ram, I am hoping to upgrade the processor to a 3.0GHz (1333 MHz) Core 2 Duo or Core 2 Quad and then also the graphics card. What graphics card can I use, suitable to run some high powered 3D programs?
Thanks
 

Blas

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Your main limitation will be the power supply (PSU). I have checked the specs (https://www.cnet.com/products/hp-compaq-business-desktop-dx2400-p-e5200-2-5-ghz-monitor-none-series/specs/), but it doesn't say what wattage the PSU has, so i'm assuming a very low wattage. You would then be limited to a graphics card (GPU) that does not require additional power from the PSU, just the power it will get from the motherboard directly. Right now, the most powerful GPUs that do not require extra power are the Nvidia GTX 1050Ti (but beware: there are some models that do require extra power, and others that don't, so pay attention to the specs; if extra power is needed, the specs whould say so explicitly). I'm not recommending any particular model because i don't know where you would buy it and it may not be available in your store. But feel free to ask about a particular model, and i'll gladly confirm if it's usable. Hope this helps! :)
 
Apr 11, 2018
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Power supply on the Hp dx2400 is 300W.
 

Blas

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Then, as i said, the GTX 1050Ti is your best option. After that, the GTX 1050 and then the GTX 1030 (or, from AMD, the 560, but Nvidia is more efficient and hence i would recommend it in your case).
 

spdragoo

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Herald
https://support.hp.com/us-en/document/c01759467

Definitely 300W on the PSU. I would even be leery of the 1050TI, as there's no guarantee that the PSU has the necessary PCIe power connectors on it. You'll need to check on that. If it doesn't have PCIe power connectors, & you can't find a GTX 1050 that doesn't require them, consider looking for a GTX 750TI (still better than the GT 1030, http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/gpu-hierarchy,4388.html) or even one of the 75W "low-power" GTX 950 models (technically equal to the 1050).
 

Blas

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You are wrong about the 1050TI, many models do not require extra power, for example:
https://www.mindfactory.de/product_info.php/4GB-KFA2-GeForce-GTX-1050-Ti-OC-Aktiv-PCIe-3-0-x16--Retail-_1126382.html
https://www.mindfactory.de/product_info.php/4GB-Gigabyte-GeForce-GTX-1050-Ti-D5-4GD-Aktiv-PCIe-3-0-x16--Retail-_1125758.html
https://www.mindfactory.de/product_info.php/4GB-Gigabyte-GeForce-GTX-1050-Ti-OC-LP-Aktiv-PCIe-3-0-x16--Retail-_1138569.html

Among many others. That is why i recommend it as the most powerful option right now.
 
Apr 11, 2018
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Here in the HP specs it says something about the graphics card, (https://support.hp.com/ie-en/document/c01759467) -NVIDIA GeForce 8400 GS (256MB) Single Head PCIe x16-
Could I use the same card but with 500MB or 1GB?
Also it has a different connector, do I need to have an adaptor for VGA?
Sorry for all the questions! (I am new to graphics cards)
 

Blas

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The 8400 GS is an ancient card, and as you say it uses a different interface, it uses AGP, which is now obsolete; the current interface is PCIe. And no, there are no adapters AGP-PCIe. As your motherboard has a 16x PCIe slot, you should get any PCIe card (which is any GPU from the last 10 years). But if you have a 8400 GS, you won't be able to use it on that PC.
You can use a card with any amount of memory (256MB, 512MB, 1GB or even more, there's no limitation).

EDIT: my bad, i misread, your card is really PCIe, not AGP. So you should be able to use it on the 16x PCIe port in your motherboard. The "different connector" you see on the motherboard might be the PCI slot? ("PCI" and "PCIe" are different: the PCIe port on your motherboard is the long one that is closer to the processor). The PCIe slot hasn't changed since its creation, so it should take your card, however old it might be. But note that any modern card is far, far better than the 8400GS.
 

spdragoo

Splendid
Herald


https://www.evga.com/products/product.aspx?pn=04G-P4-6258-KR
https://www.asus.com/us/Graphics-Cards/ROG-STRIX-GTX1050TI-O4G-GAMING/specifications/
https://us.msi.com/Graphics-card/GeForce-GTX-1050-Ti-GAMING-4G
https://www.gigabyte.com/us/Graphics-Card/GV-N105TWF2OC-4GD#sp
https://www.gigabyte.com/us/Graphics-Card/GV-N105TG1-GAMING-4GD#sp
https://www.gigabyte.com/us/Graphics-Card/GV-N105TWF2-4GD#sp

It all depends on the model you buy. These, for example, does require a 6-pin PCIe (even though they still "only" needs a 300W PSU). So if he were to buy them, & his existing PSU didn't have a 6-pin PCIe connector, he'd have to either go back & get a Molex-to-PCIe adapter, buy a new PSU (assuming the current one isn't a proprietary size), or take it back & buy a different model. And I haven't even checked all of the manufacturers, but I know that currently about half of the available models at my local Micro Center require the 6-pin connector.
 

Blas

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Probably yes, because nowadays GPUs do not come with VGA output. Some don't even come with DVI, only Display-Port and HDMI. So you should find a model with DVI output, and get a DVI-VGA adapater. You have a very old PC, hardware has changed a lot since then, but there are many modern parts that would still work with it.
 

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