[SOLVED] what is a safe overclock 24/7 for my i5 8600k

kileob

Commendable
Feb 22, 2017
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I have seen people leave their CPUs clocked to < 5GHz and I'd like to know what is a relatively safe overclock for this CPU and I'd like to know the easiest and fastest way to overclock
 
You should generally keep your core temperatures below 85 degrees celsius. As for voltage, I'd say set it to static, run at the base stock voltage it gives you and start moving the multiplier up in increments of 1. Then stress test with something like Realbench or Prime95 with AVX instructions off. If you encounter instability eg. stress test crashing or bluescreens then it means you need more voltage. If your temps exceed 85 celsius, then you likely need to improve your CPU cooling if you want to push more voltage. One thing to keep in mind is that by default the all core Turbo clock for the 8600k is 4.1GHz, so any multiplier below 41 is going to actually be slower than not overclocking at all, so I'd say start at a multiplier of 42 and work your way up.
 
Reactions: 99StefanRO
It all depends on how much voltage you need to maintain stability at a certain clockspeed. It's generally not recommended that you exceed 1.4V for Vcore and some might suggest not going past 1.35V for 24/7 if you are really worried about the CPU's longevity. Most chips will do 5.0GHz at 1.4V or lower but exactly how much needed varies from chip to chip and you can only figure out where you stand by trying it out.

It's best to overclock from the BIOS, initially using a static voltage and determining what clock and voltage you can run while staying within acceptable temperatures. There are auto-overclocking options in most motherboard BIOSes these days, but I don't recommend using them as they tend to push too much voltage to ensure stability, leading to unnecessarily high temps and power consumption.
 

kileob

Commendable
Feb 22, 2017
25
0
1,560
5
It all depends on how much voltage you need to maintain stability at a certain clockspeed. It's generally not recommended that you exceed 1.4V for Vcore and some might suggest not going past 1.35V for 24/7 if you are really worried about the CPU's longevity. Most chips will do 5.0GHz at 1.4V or lower but exactly how much needed varies from chip to chip and you can only figure out where you stand by trying it out.

It's best to overclock from the BIOS, initially using a static voltage and determining what clock and voltage you can run while staying within acceptable temperatures. There are auto-overclocking options in most motherboard BIOSes these days, but I don't recommend using them as they tend to push too much voltage to ensure stability, leading to unnecessarily high temps and power consumption.
okay go to the bios to overclock and watch the temp. but how do I know what temp is a okay temp and if im going to far is there some chart or guide? also what amount of volts to start off at?
 
You should generally keep your core temperatures below 85 degrees celsius. As for voltage, I'd say set it to static, run at the base stock voltage it gives you and start moving the multiplier up in increments of 1. Then stress test with something like Realbench or Prime95 with AVX instructions off. If you encounter instability eg. stress test crashing or bluescreens then it means you need more voltage. If your temps exceed 85 celsius, then you likely need to improve your CPU cooling if you want to push more voltage. One thing to keep in mind is that by default the all core Turbo clock for the 8600k is 4.1GHz, so any multiplier below 41 is going to actually be slower than not overclocking at all, so I'd say start at a multiplier of 42 and work your way up.
 
Reactions: 99StefanRO
If your mainboard is MCE-capable, that's where I'd start. You can evaluate performance at all-core clocks of 4.3 GHz before bumping max turbo to 4.4 GHz, up through 4.6-4.7 GHz and seeing if your core temps are under control... (As the 7700K can usually do 4.7 GHz without a core voltage increase, I'd be surprised if the 8600K was not similar through at least 4.6 GHz or so...; very easy to do Intel XTU)
 

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