Question what is better to buy for the price. help out a noob

TheGreenKing

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hi so i i have a i5 750 LGA 1156 and 16 gig ddr3 but my motherboard wont support overclocking

i want to but ether a motherboard that can overclock and move my parts over to it. the one i want is about $100 aus

or i can buy a Intel i5 2500K LGA 1155 and motherboard for $140 aus. i am not sure if my ram will work if i buy this . the motherboard says ddr3 what i have in my current system. can someone say yes or no to my ram working

how much better would the i5 2500K be over my old i5 750 when overclocked

thanks for any replies
 

Darkbreeze

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Your RAM will work on the 2500k system and the performance is probably worth the money in your market region depending on what board it comes with and whether it all works or not, although, honestly, even that Sandy bridge 2500k platform is terribly outdated. That platform is 9 years old.

It's very hard to tell you to invest money in a 9 year old platform that is likely not going to last long and doesn't offer great performance besides.

Certainly it would be better than your i5-750 by a long shot, but it's risky due to the age of those parts. You would NEED for the board to be a Z series board in order to overclock as well. Not having a Z series board means you would still lack the ability to overclock AND you would need a good cooler too. That's an additional expense. Beyond that, a higher capacity, high quality power supply would be essential for any overclocked system so depending on what you have now, that might be an additional expense.

By then you're getting into the cost of just buying into a newer platform. I'd recommend that you simply save your money and look to a more modern platform upgrade like a Ryzen 5 3600, cheap B450 board and some memory.

If that isn't an option, then I guess you do what you have to do.
 

TheGreenKing

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Your RAM will work on the 2500k system and the performance is probably worth the money in your market region depending on what board it comes with and whether it all works or not, although, honestly, even that Sandy bridge 2500k platform is terribly outdated. That platform is 9 years old.

It's very hard to tell you to invest money in a 9 year old platform that is likely not going to last long and doesn't offer great performance besides.

Certainly it would be better than your i5-750 by a long shot, but it's risky due to the age of those parts. You would NEED for the board to be a Z series board in order to overclock as well. Not having a Z series board means you would still lack the ability to overclock AND you would need a good cooler too. That's an additional expense. Beyond that, a higher capacity, high quality power supply would be essential for any overclocked system so depending on what you have now, that might be an additional expense.

By then you're getting into the cost of just buying into a newer platform. I'd recommend that you simply save your money and look to a more modern platform upgrade like a Ryzen 5 3600, cheap B450 board and some memory.

If that isn't an option, then I guess you do what you have to do.
i am putting cash aside for a ryzen build but spending $100 - $140 to get some games to run now is an ok buy in my eyes and i have all rest of the parts

the bored i was looking at for the i5 2500k is called LGA 1155 For Intel DDR3 Gigabyte GA-P75-D3 Original Motherboard USB2.0 USB3.0 SATA3 P75-D3 32GB B75 22nm

not sure if that's acceptable as its one of the cheapest.
 

Darkbreeze

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You can't overclock on P75. You'd need a Z board, Z68, Z75, Z77, preferably Z77 since it would be the least old and have the newest features of any of the compatible Z series boards for that CPU.

However, if you are not going to overclock, (and if you don't have a really good aftermarket CPU cooler, good case cooling and a high quality power supply that is at least 150w higher capacity than the system would normally need then I wouldn't bother trying to overclock anyhow) then that board MIGHT work. It still might be a poor choice though because it is a very low end motherboard intended more for the use of Pentiums and i3's than for i5's and i7's. It has no heatsinks on the VRMs, a low end very crappy VRM configuration and limited feature set but again, it will work as a temporary measure and would likely be at least somewhat better than what you have now.
 

TheGreenKing

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Dec 14, 2011
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You can't overclock on P75. You'd need a Z board, Z68, Z75, Z77, preferably Z77 since it would be the least old and have the newest features of any of the compatible Z series boards for that CPU.

However, if you are not going to overclock, (and if you don't have a really good aftermarket CPU cooler, good case cooling and a high quality power supply that is at least 150w higher capacity than the system would normally need then I wouldn't bother trying to overclock anyhow) then that board MIGHT work. It still might be a poor choice though because it is a very low end motherboard intended more for the use of Pentiums and i3's than for i5's and i7's. It has no heatsinks on the VRMs, a low end very crappy VRM configuration and limited feature set but again, it will work as a temporary measure and would likely be at least somewhat better than what you have now.
im really only buying to play around with some overclocking as i have not have the fun of learning how and i dont want to try on a $1000 system

i found this for the i5 750 GIGABYTE MOTHERBOARD GA-P55M-UD2 DDR3 USB2.0 LGA1156 mATX the cost is around $50. im probably better spending less anyway and keeping the rest for a good 2020 system
 

Darkbreeze

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Honestly, you won't actually learn anything that is going to help you or be applicable to any modern platform using that as a stepping stone for gaining overclocking experience because everything is completely different than it was back then. Truthfully, if that is you reason, it is a waste of time and money. There is really very little to "learn" when it comes to the basics of overclocking AND there is really very little to be gained by overclocking on current and last gen AMD or Intel platforms because they are already pushing these parts as far as they reasonably can without risking the long term longevity of the hardware anyhow.

Plus, the methods you needed to use to overclock on that P55 board are not even applicable to modern platforms at all. It would still require you to learn all over again because you can't overclock them the same way. It's like learning to ride a bike thinking that it will somehow translate into being able to ride a motorcycle. Other than learning balance, there is really no comparison between the two.

So if you buy a new Ryzen platform, overclocking should probably be about the last thing on your mind. The stock performance is going to be more than double your current i5-750 when comparing single core performance and more than 5.3 times more performance when it comes to multithreaded tasks. You won't NEED to overclock if you go with an entry level Ryzen 3600, or even a 2nd Gen CPU like the 2600x.

But if you really want to waste the money on that board just to be able to tinker around with it, then it should do the job. Keep in mind, like I said, you can't just be overclocking without aftermarket cooling and a good power supply otherwise you are not only throwing away money on new parts, you risk throwing your old parts in the trash bin as well.
 

TheGreenKing

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Dec 14, 2011
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Honestly, you won't actually learn anything that is going to help you or be applicable to any modern platform using that as a stepping stone for gaining overclocking experience because everything is completely different than it was back then. Truthfully, if that is you reason, it is a waste of time and money. There is really very little to "learn" when it comes to the basics of overclocking AND there is really very little to be gained by overclocking on current and last gen AMD or Intel platforms because they are already pushing these parts as far as they reasonably can without risking the long term longevity of the hardware anyhow.

Plus, the methods you needed to use to overclock on that P55 board are not even applicable to modern platforms at all. It would still require you to learn all over again because you can't overclock them the same way. It's like learning to ride a bike thinking that it will somehow translate into being able to ride a motorcycle. Other than learning balance, there is really no comparison between the two.

So if you buy a new Ryzen platform, overclocking should probably be about the last thing on your mind. The stock performance is going to be more than double your current i5-750 when comparing single core performance and more than 5.3 times more performance when it comes to multithreaded tasks. You won't NEED to overclock if you go with an entry level Ryzen 3600, or even a 2nd Gen CPU like the 2600x.

But if you really want to waste the money on that board just to be able to tinker around with it, then it should do the job. Keep in mind, like I said, you can't just be overclocking without aftermarket cooling and a good power supply otherwise you are not only throwing away money on new parts, you risk throwing your old parts in the trash bin as well.
hmm you do make a good point and if its irrelevant to any of the newer stuff then i guess i wont waste my time messing with it. thanks for your feedback on this.
 

Darkbreeze

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Just look at it this way, that's 120 or even 50 bucks that could get you just that much closer that much quicker, to an upgrade that actually makes sense and isn't a waste of money. I'd just deal with what I have for now, and then put the money towards the upgrade that much sooner.
 
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