What is difference betwteen SFP/GBIC (mini GBIC)

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I have no knowlege about 1000BASE-T,LX,LH,SX etc and SFP/mini GBIC.
What these terms stand for?
Can anyone give a brife summary about it.

Thanks in advance!

SY
 
G

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In article <dc998cfd.0408220141.243361c6@posting.google.com>,
wld <aaabbb16@hotmail.com> wrote:
:I have no knowlege about 1000BASE-T,LX,LH,SX etc and SFP/mini GBIC.
:What these terms stand for?

The 1000 stands for a data transfer rate (including all overheads)
of 1000 megabits per second.

'Base' gives you information about the media (wires of some sort)

'-T' tells you which of the several competing 1000Base implimentations
has been used. You need to research the details, though, as the '-T'
by itself has no meaning (it's just part of the name).

You might, for example, see 10BaseT and that is different than 10BaseTX
in implimentation.

LX, LH, SX are terms used in fibre optic communications, and designate
the frequency and signalling standard to be used over the fibre line.

SX is commonly used within one building between closely adjacent
buildings; the 'S' hints at "short distance". There is a specific
frequency of light that is used for SX, and it expects a type of
fibre known as "multimode" -- which is a type of fibre that can
carry several signals simultaneously [in principle] but tends to disperse
the signals relatively quickly.

LX uses a different frequency, and is more suitable for longer
distances. The 'L' can be read as a hint for "long distance". LX
-can- be used over multimode, but the distances you can reach that way
are not particularily good. LX is usually used over a "single mode"
fibre (designed for one signal at a time] that is thinner than
"multimode". There are two different thicknesses of single-mode fibre
that can be used with LX. My recollection is that the official distance
you can reach with LX does not depend upon the fibre size... but the
*practical*, real-life, "how far can you stretch it" distance is
greater with the thinner single-mode fibre. Typically you can do
an entire campus with LX.

LH uses a thinner single-mode fibre. The 'LH' hints at "long haul", and
it is suitable for going several tens of kilometers. LH might be used
for your cross-town links to your ISP. In practice, Cisco uses a single
GBIC that has the functions of both LX and LH, so you will usually
see LX/LH in connection with Cisco GBICs. There -are- LX GBICs on the
market that are not able to do LH, so if you need the longer distances,
don't try to go with cheap third-party GBICs without testing.

There is also an SZ you might see referenced. I do not know if it
has made it to an official standard yet; but it is for "super long haul",
for noticably longer distances yet. SZ might be used to carry data
between cities.


GBIC is the "GigaBit Interface Connector", and it is a little device that
knows how to translate SX, LX, LH, etc., and or other types
of gigabit signals (such as over copper), into a common format. GBIC
connectors plug into slots in switches/routers, and are thus ways of
changing the interface capabilities of the switches/routers without
having to get new boards or replacing the switches/routers. They are,
in a sense, media convertors.

(Note: some third-party GBICs are as good or better than the one's
Cisco sells, for a fraction of the price of Cisco's -- but some of the
brands of cheap GBICs are not very good quality or will only work well
under narrow conditions.)


SFP are similar in purpose to GBIC, but are noticably smaller (and thus you
can put more of them into a small space). There are not as many
varieties of SFP available as there are of GBIC. 'SFP' stands for
"Small Form Pluggable".
--
Feep if you love VT-52's.
 
G

Guest

Guest
Archived from groups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet (More info?)

I have only a couple of minor disagreements with the response.

"BASE," in 10BASE-T for example, means "baseband." This is to
differentiate these standards from 10BROAD36, a scheme for implementing
Ethernet, modulated over two RF carriers, over cable TV systems. (In
that case, 36 stands for the 36 MHz total channel bandwidth required for
transmit and receive frequency bands, each of which requires 18 MHz.)
See Clause 11 of IEEE 802.3 for all the gory details on the 10BROAD36
physical layer.

Also parenthetically, 10BROAD36 is *not* what today's cable broadband
Internet services typically provide.

"T" in the various designations means "twisted pair." This originally
differentiated these Ethernets from the coax variety of baseband options
(10BASE2 and 10BASE5). For Gigabit Ethernet, there's also a 1000BASE-CX
for very short runs of shielded twisted pair copper (25 meters), whereas
1000BASE-T is only for unshielded twisted pair cables (100 meter limit,
using a 4-lane bidirectional scheme which is considerably fancier than
the older 1000BASE-CX standard).

In the fiber optic variants of Ethernet, "S" I believe stands of "short
wavelength," meaning 850 nm, whereas "L" stands for "long wavelength,"
meaning 1300 nm. And there's E for 1550 nm light.

But it's true that short wavelength often translates to shorter
distances, although the fiber diameter also plays a big role in link
length limits. For instance, at 10 Gb/s, 850 nm will provide link limits
over some 50 um multimode fiber cables equal to 1300 nm over 62.5 um
fiber cores, using a 4-lane scheme. I also agree that the short
wavelength light is not used in single-mode fiber.

Anyway, these designations are not entirely consistent across the
various Ethernet standards. So if things start making sense, just wait
for the next standard to show up.

Bert


"Walter Roberson" <roberson@ibd.nrc-cnrc.gc.ca> wrote in message
news:cgags9$b7n$1@canopus.cc.umanitoba.ca...
> In article <dc998cfd.0408220141.243361c6@posting.google.com>,
> wld <aaabbb16@hotmail.com> wrote:
> :I have no knowlege about 1000BASE-T,LX,LH,SX etc and SFP/mini GBIC.
> :What these terms stand for?
>
> The 1000 stands for a data transfer rate (including all overheads)
> of 1000 megabits per second.
>
> 'Base' gives you information about the media (wires of some sort)
>
> '-T' tells you which of the several competing 1000Base implimentations
> has been used. You need to research the details, though, as the '-T'
> by itself has no meaning (it's just part of the name).
>
> You might, for example, see 10BaseT and that is different than
10BaseTX
> in implimentation.
>
> LX, LH, SX are terms used in fibre optic communications, and designate
> the frequency and signalling standard to be used over the fibre line.
>
> SX is commonly used within one building between closely adjacent
> buildings; the 'S' hints at "short distance". There is a specific
> frequency of light that is used for SX, and it expects a type of
> fibre known as "multimode" -- which is a type of fibre that can
> carry several signals simultaneously [in principle] but tends to
disperse
> the signals relatively quickly.
>
> LX uses a different frequency, and is more suitable for longer
> distances. The 'L' can be read as a hint for "long distance". LX
> -can- be used over multimode, but the distances you can reach that way
> are not particularily good. LX is usually used over a "single mode"
> fibre (designed for one signal at a time] that is thinner than
> "multimode". There are two different thicknesses of single-mode fibre
> that can be used with LX. My recollection is that the official
distance
> you can reach with LX does not depend upon the fibre size... but the
> *practical*, real-life, "how far can you stretch it" distance is
> greater with the thinner single-mode fibre. Typically you can do
> an entire campus with LX.
>
> LH uses a thinner single-mode fibre. The 'LH' hints at "long haul",
and
> it is suitable for going several tens of kilometers. LH might be used
> for your cross-town links to your ISP. In practice, Cisco uses a
single
> GBIC that has the functions of both LX and LH, so you will usually
> see LX/LH in connection with Cisco GBICs. There -are- LX GBICs on the
> market that are not able to do LH, so if you need the longer
distances,
> don't try to go with cheap third-party GBICs without testing.
>
> There is also an SZ you might see referenced. I do not know if it
> has made it to an official standard yet; but it is for "super long
haul",
> for noticably longer distances yet. SZ might be used to carry data
> between cities.
>
>
> GBIC is the "GigaBit Interface Connector", and it is a little device
that
> knows how to translate SX, LX, LH, etc., and or other types
> of gigabit signals (such as over copper), into a common format. GBIC
> connectors plug into slots in switches/routers, and are thus ways of
> changing the interface capabilities of the switches/routers without
> having to get new boards or replacing the switches/routers. They are,
> in a sense, media convertors.
>
> (Note: some third-party GBICs are as good or better than the one's
> Cisco sells, for a fraction of the price of Cisco's -- but some of the
> brands of cheap GBICs are not very good quality or will only work well
> under narrow conditions.)
>
>
> SFP are similar in purpose to GBIC, but are noticably smaller (and
thus you
> can put more of them into a small space). There are not as many
> varieties of SFP available as there are of GBIC. 'SFP' stands for
> "Small Form Pluggable".
> --
> Feep if you love VT-52's.
 
G

Guest

Guest
Archived from groups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet (More info?)

hi SY Can you access the 'www.optech.com.tw' (http://www.optech.com.tw/)
thw web have the Knowlege GBIC/SFP ..
:)

Ryan

wld Wrote:
> I have no knowlege about 1000BASE-T,LX,LH,SX etc and SFP/mini GBIC.
> What these terms stand for?
> Can anyone give a brife summary about it.
>
> Thanks in advance!
>
> SY


--
ryan ho
brought to you by http://www.wifi-forum.com/
 
G

Guest

Guest
Archived from groups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet (More info?)

hi Can you access the 'www.optech.com.tw' (http://www.optech.com.tw/) .
thw web have the Knowlege GBIC/SFP ..
:)

Ryan

wld Wrote:
> I have no knowlege about 1000BASE-T,LX,LH,SX etc and SFP/mini GBIC.
> What these terms stand for?
> Can anyone give a brife summary about it.
>
> Thanks in advance!
>
> SY


--
ryan ho
brought to you by http://www.wifi-forum.com/
 

broj999

Honorable
Oct 8, 2013
1
0
10,510
All this explanation of the various different types of signals the SFP can take is really not explaining what a SFP does. Plain and simple its a media converter. In most cases it takes a optical signal and converts it to an electrical signal.