amoretto

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Can someone please explain it to me? Is it worth getting, and how would I if I want to custom build a PC? Is it only available with Intel Processors?
 

endyen

Splendid
HT is Intel's most advanced multi-tasking tool. It makes it easier for HT enabled progs to run more than 1 thread at a time. Most of the time, it does little. For office type applications, it can appear to be quite useful.
Now that dual core chips are right around the corner, it isn't very impressive.
 

jammydodger

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It stands for hyper-threading and allows a single CPU to execute two threads at the same time. This sounds really good, it in reality few programs benefit very much from it.

Any program that benefits from HT technology has to be programed for either multiple CPU's or for HT enabled CPU's. So very few games can take advantage of it.

Hyper threading is used by intel only. It is also only supported by windows XP and certain versions of unix (Windows2000, ME, 98 etc. do not supports Hyper threading).
 

Excalibur

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Is Hyper Transport on AMDs the same as Hyper Threading on Intels or is it something different, if so what does it actually do.

My Mum always said God has a plan, guess I was Plan B
 

jammydodger

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They are completly different things. Hyper transport is the name of the link between the CPU and is southbridge (the part of the computer that controlls all the PC's peripheral devices).

Hyper threading is the ability of the CPU to process 2 threads at the same time. As far as i know AMD has no intention of supporting the latter.
 
No south bridge on nF3/nF4 chipsets...

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<font color=red>You're a boil on the arse of progress - don't make me squeeze you!</font color=red>
 

pat

Expert
It is Home Theater. You can use either Intel or AMD for HT PCs. Dont know if that help..


-Always put the blame on you first, then on the hardware, UNLESS YOU HAVE A PROBLEM WITH A MSI BOARD !!!
 

Cybercraig

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I thought it was slang for "Hot Tuna". A good band. :lol:


Abit IS7 - 3.0C @ 3.6ghz - Mushkin PC4000 (2 X 512) - Sapphire 9800Pro - TT 420 watt Pure Power
Samsung 120gb ATA-100 - Maxtor 40gb ATA - 100
Sony DRU-510A - Yellowtail Merlot
 

jammydodger

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There is a southbridge, there just isnt a northbridge? Or so I have been led to believe? They might not call it a southbridge any more because it now handles AGP aswell but its still basically the same thing.
 

P4Man

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>So it doesnt stand for Huge Tit's then?

Nope, you are confused with PD-SOI, Partially Depleted Silicon on insulator.. that means huge, but somewhat leaking, fake tits on a frigid body. Not good, but still better than strained silicon, which is the same, but after 60 year, IOW, hanging tits. Worst of all is FD-SOI, fully depleted silicon on insulator. I don't think I have to explain that; its NOT pretty !

= The views stated herein are my personal views, and not necessarily the views of my wife. =
 

sjonnie

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<i>>what is HT technology</i>
Hyper-threading
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.
(Redirected from Hyperthreading)

Hyper-Threading (HTT = Hyper Threading Technology) is Intel's trademark for their implementation of the simultaneous multithreading technology on the Pentium 4 microarchitecture. It is basically a more advanced form of Super-threading that first debuted on the Intel Xeon processors and later added to Pentium 4 processors. The technology improves processor performance under certain workloads by providing useful work for execution units that would otherwise be idle, for example during a cache miss.

The advantages of Hyper-Threading are listed as improved support for multi-threaded code, allowing multiple threads to run simultaneously, improved reaction and response time, and increased number of users a server can support.

Hyper-Threading works by duplicating certain sections of the processor—those that store the architectural state—but not duplicating the main execution resources. This allows a Hyper-Threading equipped processor to pretend to be two "logical" processors to the host operating system, allowing the operating system to schedule two threads or processes simultaneously. Where execution resources in a non-Hyper-Threading capable processor are not used by the current task, and especially when the processor is stalled, a Hyper-Threading equipped processor may use those execution resources to execute the other scheduled task. (Reasons for the processor to stall include a cache miss, a branch misprediction and waiting for results of previous instructions before the current one can be executed.)

Except for its performance implications, this innovation is transparent to operating systems and programs. All that is required to take advantage of Hyper-Threading is symmetric multiprocessing (SMP) support in the operating system, as the logical processors appear as standard separate processors.

However, it is possible to optimise operating system behaviour on Hyper-Threading capable systems, such as the Linux techniques discussed in Kernel Traffic (http://www.kerneltraffic.org/kernel-traffic/topics/Hyperthreading.html). For example, consider an SMP system with two physical processors that are both Hyper-Threaded (for a total of four logical processors). If the operating system's process scheduler is unaware of Hyper-Threading, it would treat all four processors the same. As a result, if only two processes are eligible to run, it might choose to schedule those processes on the two logical processors that happen to belong to one of the physical processors. Thus, one CPU would be extremely busy while the other CPU would be completely idle, leading to poor overall performance. This problem can be avoided by improving the scheduler to treat logical processors different from physical processors; in a sense, this is a limited form of the scheduler changes that are required for NUMA systems.

According to Intel, the first implementation only used an additional 5% of the die area over the "normal" processor, yet yielded performance improvements of 15-30%.
 
We can at least agree tha there is one chip that handles everything!

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