Question What is Momentum Cache feature in SSD and how it works?

Dec 3, 2021
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I purchased a Crucial BX500 240GB (Sata SSD) and I installed it's Crucial Storage Executive software on my windows. In the software there is an option called "Momentum Cache". How it improve my Laptop performance ? Does it increase the write cycles on my ssd? Should I enable it or just disable it?
 

Lafong

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TommyTwoTone66

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Stop worrying about write cycles. Right now.

Did you ever worry about write cycles on your HDD? No, of course not. Well guess what, HDDs have a limited write cycle lifespan as well! Surprising huh?

Nobody ever talked about write cycles until the very first consumer SSDs came to market, which had very low quality flash and a somewhat limited number of writes. This was back in 2008. If you wrote too much to a 2008 SSD it could fail. However what made the problem way worse was that those early drives just put all the data onto the flash in the same order you wrote it, and never moved it around. So your MFT was always on the same area of the same flash chip getting overwritten every time you changed a file. That was then.

SSDs have come a long, long way since 2008. Any SSD you can buy now has wear-levelling and spare area, so you should basically treat it like it has UNLIMITED write cycles, because it will never wear out no matter what you do to it.

To answer your question, no. "Momentum Cache" is not worth installing. Windows will do a better job of caching your data on its own. That type of software tends to be there just to improve SSD benchmarks and nothing else.
 
Stop worrying about write cycles.
Basically every sentence you wrote there is wrong.

Yes - you have to worry about SSD write cycles.
No - HDDs do not have limited write cycles.
Early SSDs have much better write endurance than modern SSDs. Each new SSD cell generation has worse endurance ratings than previous one.
SLC - have best endurance, MLC -worse, TLC - worse, QLC - the worst.
All SSDs have wear leveling. It is not something only newest SSDs would have.
 
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TommyTwoTone66

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Basically every sentence you wrote there is wrong.

Yes - you have to worry about SSD write cycles.
No - HDDs do not have limited write cycles.
Early SSDs have much better write endurance than modern SSDs. Each new SSD cell generation has worse endurance ratings than previous one.
SLC - have best endurance, MLC -worse, TLC - worse, QLC - the worst.
All SSDs have wear leveling. It is not something only newest SSDs would have.
Incorrect. No you don't have to worry. Any drive made past 2012 has had wear-levelling and spare area allocated as standard. The BX500 is no exception. As the flash cells wear out, they are automatically replaced by ones from the spare area. Additionally, the drive controller spreads the writes evenly over all of the flash cells so that one particular chip or page is not being written to all of the time. I have spent more time researching and discussing this PC issue than any other, and it is amazing how many people still don't get it.

HDDs wear out same as any mechanical equipment. the more you write to it the more you wear out the write heads. Simple physics. You could write to a HDD continuously for 10 years before it wore out. Much the same as a modern SSD.

I think you're confusing "Early" with your idea of Early. I'm talking about the 2008 drives with JMicron controllers, e.g:



These were the drives that gave SSDs their "limited write cycles, bursts into flames if you defrag it or use it for Swap file" reputation. And rightly so, they were awful.

SLC, MLC, TLC, QLC, all of these are totally meaningless to consumers. All of them will perform the exact same in Windows. The only people who it really makes a difference to are the Infrastructure engineers at banks, power stations or airport control towers, who need to KNOW that their solid state drive is not going to fail when used in a high-volume transactional database. If you're running a SAN device on FreeBSD, or a high-volume transactional database server, then sure, maybe worry about what type of chips your SSD has. Windows 11 will not wear out a QLC drive, no matter how many times you delete and reinstall Skyrim.

All SSDs do not have wear levelling. It was introduced in 2009 and didn't become mainstream until 2010. There are still some older drives out there that will write to the same section of the same chip over and over and over until it pops. Back in 2009 / 2010 this added further fuel to the "My SSD is gonna asplode!!!1!" paranoid fear.

None of those drives are for sale any more, so you're right it's ridiculous in 2021 to be worrying about limiting writes to your SSD. Anyone who does this is wasting their time massively and worrying about something that's never going to happen.
 
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TommyTwoTone66

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OCZ SSD 64GB 'Core series' Solid State Disk:
https://www.overclock3d.net/reviews/storage/ocz_ssd_64gb_core_series_solid_state_disk/2

The photo of the PCB shows a JMicron JMF602 controller.

JMF602 SATA II to Flash Controller v0.1 [JMF602_Product_Brief_v0.1.pdf]
http://www.usbdev.ru/?wpfb_dl=2910

"In addition, dynamic and whole drive static wear leveling are used in JMF602 to provide the best extension of drive life time."
It might have been technically available on the controllers, but firmwares that could actually use wear levelling correctly didn’t reach consumers until sandforce 2nd gen.
 

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