[SOLVED] What is the MAX Frequency of RAM for my ASUS E1-6010 1.35 (1333) GHz?

Nov 21, 2020
4
0
10
0
Hello there!

I am using a Laptop of ASUS which is the E1-6010 1.35 GHz Notebook [It's slower than a tortoise].
Now, the system is using a 4 Gb DDR3 RAM of 1333 mhz frequency. I want to add one more 4 Gb DDR3 RAM, but I am not sure whether 1600 Mhz will work or I need to find that old 1333 Mhz Frequency RAM?

Please do help.
 
Now I checked through the Command "wmic memorychip get devicelocator, speed" and got this result:
CMD 1600
But when I check the Memory Speed in Performance Tab of Task Manager, I get the speed as 1333 Mhz, what do both mean?
Does it mean that I can use 1600 Mhz Ram but only using a 1333 Mhz Ram, or does it mean that I can only use a 1333 Mhz Ram though the RAM is 1600 Mhz.
My understanding is that memory may come rated at 1333Mhz and can also be programmed with a profile called XMP.
When set in Bios XMP (Extended Memory Profile) will take advantage of higher than standard JDEC memory speeds.
Timings and voltage are changed to be able to achieve the extra frequency.

During POST (power-on self-test), part of the process configures installed hardware, including your memory.
Your computer needs to know the model of your RAM as well as which timings and frequency to set.

BIOS will use a small chip on your RAM modules called an SPD (serial presence detect) chip to set memory timing and frequency. XMP is an extension of SPD which provides higher frequencies and tighter timings for your memory to run at. It also corrects for the extra voltage required to provides a stable overclock.
 
Nov 21, 2020
4
0
10
0
Now I checked through the Command "wmic memorychip get devicelocator, speed" and got this result:
CMD 1600
But when I check the Memory Speed in Performance Tab of Task Manager, I get the speed as 1333 Mhz, what do both mean?
Does it mean that I can use 1600 Mhz Ram but only using a 1333 Mhz Ram, or does it mean that I can only use a 1333 Mhz Ram though the RAM is 1600 Mhz.
 
Now I checked through the Command "wmic memorychip get devicelocator, speed" and got this result:
CMD 1600
But when I check the Memory Speed in Performance Tab of Task Manager, I get the speed as 1333 Mhz, what do both mean?
Does it mean that I can use 1600 Mhz Ram but only using a 1333 Mhz Ram, or does it mean that I can only use a 1333 Mhz Ram though the RAM is 1600 Mhz.
My understanding is that memory may come rated at 1333Mhz and can also be programmed with a profile called XMP.
When set in Bios XMP (Extended Memory Profile) will take advantage of higher than standard JDEC memory speeds.
Timings and voltage are changed to be able to achieve the extra frequency.

During POST (power-on self-test), part of the process configures installed hardware, including your memory.
Your computer needs to know the model of your RAM as well as which timings and frequency to set.

BIOS will use a small chip on your RAM modules called an SPD (serial presence detect) chip to set memory timing and frequency. XMP is an extension of SPD which provides higher frequencies and tighter timings for your memory to run at. It also corrects for the extra voltage required to provides a stable overclock.
 

egda23

Estimable
Now I checked through the Command "wmic memorychip get devicelocator, speed" and got this result:
CMD 1600
But when I check the Memory Speed in Performance Tab of Task Manager, I get the speed as 1333 Mhz, what do both mean?
Does it mean that I can use 1600 Mhz Ram but only using a 1333 Mhz Ram, or does it mean that I can only use a 1333 Mhz Ram though the RAM is 1600 Mhz.
Use a program called CPU-Z.
Check the memory Tab to see the correct RAM speed as used now
 
Nov 21, 2020
4
0
10
0
My understanding is that memory may come rated at 1333Mhz and can also be programmed with a profile called XMP.
When set in Bios XMP (Extended Memory Profile) will take advantage of higher than standard JDEC memory speeds.
Timings and voltage are changed to be able to achieve the extra frequency.

During POST (power-on self-test), part of the process configures installed hardware, including your memory.
Your computer needs to know the model of your RAM as well as which timings and frequency to set.

BIOS will use a small chip on your RAM modules called an SPD (serial presence detect) chip to set memory timing and frequency. XMP is an extension of SPD which provides higher frequencies and tighter timings for your memory to run at. It also corrects for the extra voltage required to provides a stable overclock.
Now, does that imply I can use a 1333 Mhz built in RAM and also an extra 1600 Mhz RAM at the same time? Without any hindrances?
 
You certainly cannot do that by mixing kits and if they did they would default to the lowest frequency.
RAM kits are binned at the manufacturers factory to match each others Latency and if capable are programmed with an XMP profile which can be selected in Bios. if the kit has a profile for Overclocking it will show in CPUz as a listing.

If your still unsure then try it and see. No harm will come from trying. The system will tell you the Overclock has failed or the system will boot.
 

ASK THE COMMUNITY