Question What is the Power Consumption of a Phanteks Halos Lux Digital Fan Frame?

Pronalt

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I'm going to buy Asus Rog Crosshair VIII Dark Hero X570 motherboard. And I'm going to use 3 quantity of 120mm, 4 quantity of 140mm fans in p500a DRGB case. My motherboard's one 3 pin d-rgb header's max ampere is 3A. Can my motherboard handle it? I already ordered 3 Phanteks Halos Lux Digital 120mm fan frames. Only 140mm, 4 quantity of Phanteks Halos Lux Digital fan frames left to buy. Sorry about my grammar, its not my native language. If you need my specs, i can post pcpartpicker link. Also P500A DRGB case has rgb line on left side. I don't know what is the power consumption of that line. Maybe i can buy Lian Li Strimer Plus 24-Pin v2 which uses 5v 3 pin i think. Do you have any solution if its not enough? Thanks.
 

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Well, there is partial info available for this. The mobo manual says each of its two Digital Addressable Gen2 ARGB headers can support a max of 3 A current draw, and re-expresses that as a max 500 LED's total (presume 250 per header). Most such LED's are the same, so we are left to assume that the ones in the Phanteks frames are like that. Phanteks specifies that those frames contain 30 LED's each. So if you distribute 7 or 8 fan frames over two headers, I'm sure there is NO problem. It appears four frames might use half of the max capacity of one header.
 
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Well, there is partial info available for this. The mobo manual says each of its two Digital Addressable Gen2 ARGB headers can support a max of 3 A current draw, and re-expresses that as a max 500 LED's total (presume 250 per header). Most such LED's are the same, so we are left to assume that the ones in the Phanteks frames are like that. Phanteks specifies that those frames contain 30 LED's each. So if you distribute 7 or 8 fan frames over two headers, I'm sure there is NO problem. It appears four frames might use half of the max capacity of one header.
First of all, Thank you.
At here it says one header can support to max 3A - 120 LEDS. 30*7 = 210 LEDs.

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1-cw7A2MDHPvA-oB3OKXivdUo9BbTcsss1Rzy3J4hRyA/edit#gid=2112472504

5V/D/-/G headers

WS2812B Addressable
Max. Rating = 3A, 120x LEDs

But i don't know can it handle Lian Li Strimer Plus V2 24 pin argb cable. I think it isn't. So what should i do? I found something like that. It uses usb port for argb.

View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zN80tUbl4T0
 

Paperdoc

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I could not find any statement in that spreadsheet about ARGB header power limit for that mobo (line 30). But in the mobo manual form the maker here

https://dlcdnets.asus.com/pub/ASUS/mb/SocketAM4/ROG_CROSSHAIR_VIII_DARK_HERO/E17453_ROG_CROSSHAIR_VIII_DARK_HERO_UM_V2_WEB.pdf

see p. 1-17 where it says. :"the addressable headers on this board can handle a combined maximum of 500 LEDs ". That was the basis for my saying 250 LED's per header. And this clearly states that this applies to the Addressable headers, not including the two plain RGB headers.

Another source of info is this explanation


and there you need to look only at the section on addressable strips. It says virtually all such systems use LED's that require at max 20mA current. It gets a bit tricky on one point. Recognize that, as tha page points out, on an ARGB strip the LED's are arranged as three LED's (one each colour) in each NODE. So IF the count of lights in the strip is in terms of Nodes, then you must count three LED's each. Now, the Phanteks web page says each frame had "30 LED's", which would imply 10 Nodes. IF that is literally correct, then one frame uses 30 x 0.020A = 0.60A max, and four frames could use up to 2.4A. If one assumes that Phanteks mis-spoke and a frame has 30 Nodes of three LED's each, that balloons the current to 1.8A each frame, and I am pretty sure that is MUCH more than any common ARGB lighting unit. At that rate, you'd never be able to plug even two units into one header! So I am confident the estimate of 0.60 A per frame as the max is a good one.

In the calculation you made above, you assumed 30 LEDs per frame, and they used a spec of 3A or 120 LED's per header. That means they used 25mA per LED, an over-estimate to ensure safety. Now, as you say, 7 such frames is 210 LEDs total, BUT I said you should split those frames up so no more than 4 frames (not all 7) are on one header. Thus the max load on ONE header will be 120 LEDs, which is OK.
 
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I could not find any statement in that spreadsheet about ARGB header power limit for that mobo (line 30). But in the mobo manual form the maker here

https://dlcdnets.asus.com/pub/ASUS/mb/SocketAM4/ROG_CROSSHAIR_VIII_DARK_HERO/E17453_ROG_CROSSHAIR_VIII_DARK_HERO_UM_V2_WEB.pdf

see p. 1-17 where it says. :"the addressable headers on this board can handle a combined maximum of 500 LEDs ". That was the basis for my saying 250 LED's per header. And this clearly states that this applies to the Addressable headers, not including the two plain RGB headers.

Another source of info is this explanation


and there you need to look only at the section on addressable strips. It says virtually all such systems use LED's that require at max 20mA current. It gets a bit tricky on one point. Recognize that, as tha page points out, on an ARGB strip the LED's are arranged as three LED's (one each colour) in each NODE. So IF the count of lights in the strip is in terms of Nodes, then you must count three LED's each. Now, the Phanteks web page says each frame had "30 LED's", which would imply 10 Nodes. IF that is literally correct, then one frame uses 30 x 0.020A = 0.60A max, and four frames could use up to 2.4A. If one assumes that Phanteks mis-spoke and a frame has 30 Nodes of three LED's each, that balloons the current to 1.8A each frame, and I am pretty sure that is MUCH more than any common ARGB lighting unit. At that rate, you'd never be able to plug even two units into one header! So I am confident the estimate of 0.60 A per frame as the max is a good one.

In the calculation you made above, you assumed 30 LEDs per frame, and they used a spec of 3A or 120 LED's per header. That means they used 25mA per LED, an over-estimate to ensure safety. Now, as you say, 7 such frames is 210 LEDs total, BUT I said you should split those frames up so no more than 4 frames (not all 7) are on one header. Thus the max load on ONE header will be 120 LEDs, which is OK.
Thank you but if i trust to asus's official website which you posted, there won't be any problem because it says mb can support up to 500 leds . But how do you know phanteks leds are 5050 package which uses 20 mA per led. Also can i use 2x lian li strimer plus v2 24 pin for motherboard and video card. do you know anything about that? Thank you again you are the best.

Also here it is what am i talking about.

https://prnt.sc/vpegax
 
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Paperdoc

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Regarding that Lian Li lighted cable, I see it says the 24-pin cable contains 120 LED's. That is the same as the TOTAL for FOUR of the Phanteks frames, so one cable could be used alone on one mobo header. You don't have that many.

HOWEVER, there is one thing I cannot see from that web page. The cable comes with its own power supply / controller box that plugs into a PSU output for power, and you can use it that way as a manual control without any connection to the mobo. It then offers an option that IF you add a connection to a mobo header, one setting on that control box allows you to turn over control to the mobo signals, rather than the manual buttons. What is NOT stated is, when you execise that toption, where does the power for the strip come from? Does it continue to use power only from the PSU and NOT add any load to the mobo header? If it does things that way, then you CAN afford to connect his to a mobo header. You need to contact Lian Li Tech Support to get that important info.

The other alternative for using a lot of ARGB lighting units is to get a powered ARGB HUB. That is a device that gets the control signals only from the mobo header, but gets the actual power for the lights it feeds from the PSU directly. They are similar in concept to a 4-pin Fan Hub. By using that you can avoid limits of the mobo header max current load, but you still have a limit (about 4.5 to 5 A, rather than 3.0 A) for one Hub. If you need more details on that, post back here.
 
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Regarding that Lian Li lighted cable, I see it says the 24-pin cable contains 120 LED's. That is the same as the TOTAL for FOUR of the Phanteks frames, so one cable could be used alone on one mobo header. You don;t have that many.

HOWEVER, there is one thing I cannot see from that web page. The cable comes with its own power supply / controller box that plugs into a PSU output for power, and you can use it that way as a manual control without any connection to the mobo. It then offers an option that IF you add a connection to a mob header, one setting on that control box allows you to turn over control to the mobo signals, rather than the manual buttons. What is NOT stated is, when you execise that toption, where does the power for the strip come from? Does it continue to use power only from the PSU and NOT add any load to the mobo header? If it does things that way, then you CAN afford to connect his to a mobo header. You need to contact Lian Li Tech Support to get that important info.

The other alternative for using a lot of ARGB lighting units is to get a powered ARGB HUB. That is a device that gets the control signals only from the mobo header, but gets the actual power for the lights it feeds from the PSU directly. They are similar in concept to a 4-pin Fan Hub. By using that you can avoid limits of the mobo header max current load, but you still have a limit (about 4.5 to 5 A, rather than 3.0 A) for one Hub. If you need more details on that, post back here.
Thanks for the answer, Can i use something like that?

View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zN80tUbl4T0


Or do i need something like that?

https://www.amazon.com/Cooler-Master-MASTERFAN-Addressable-Lighting/dp/B0829QNBS2

I think these are powered ARGB hubs. Am i wrong?
 

Paperdoc

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I don't recommend the first item in the video you've posted for your situation. First of all, it is expensive and can do more than you need, but also it may be limited to 3-pin fans. You have not told us what fans you plan. The second item, which is a simpler unit at half the price, can handle up to six fans, AND do BOTH fan motors and fan lights. We don't have details of all your fans, nor of exactly what maker and model number of mobo you plan to get. Seven fans you may be able to connect to mobo headers for the MOTOR controls with simple Splitters, or maybe using a fan Hub. All of the discussion above, though is about the LIGHTS in the planned fan frames.

It got a bit more complicated when you went beyond seven light frames to an eighth lighting device. Or maybe ninth? I ask because the link to the Lina Li Strimer Plus cables says they sell one for the 24-pin main power cable, and another for the 8-pin cable to feed a video card. Do you plan both, or just the 24-pin main power cable?

If we are only dealing with the LIGHTS, a less expensive ARGB Hub might be sufficient. You might even need two. OR you might need NONE! The key unanswered question is how those lighted cables from Lian Li are fed power. I can imagine that they MAY have been designed to NOT pull any power from the mobo ARGB headers. OR they may get power from a connection to a PSU SATA power output. OR they MAY require power from the mobo ARGB header in some cases. We need to know that answer from Lian Li Tech Support before we can design the full power and control connection system.
 
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I don't recommend the first item in the video you've posted for your situation. First of all, it is expensive and can do more than you need, but also it may be limited to 3-pin fans. You have not told us what fans you plan. The second item, which is a simpler unit at half the price, can handle up to six fans, AND do BOTH fan motors and fan lights. We don't have details of all your fans, nor of exactly what maker and model number of mobo you plan to get. Seven fans you may be able to connect to mobo headers for the MOTOR controls with simple Splitters, or maybe using a fan Hub. All of the discussion above, though is about the LIGHTS in the planned fan frames.

It got a bit more complicated when you went beyond seven light frames to an eighth lighting device. Or maybe ninth? I ask because the link to the Lina Li Strimer Plus cables says they sell one for the 24-pin main power cable, and another for the 8-pin cable to feed a video card. Do you plan both, or just the 24-pin main power cable?

If we are only dealing with the LIGHTS, a less expensive ARGB Hub might be sufficient. You might even need two. OR you might need NONE! The key unanswered question is how those lighted cables from Lian Li are fed power. I can imagine that they MAY have been designed to NOT pull any power from the mobo ARGB headers. OR they may get power from a connection to a PSU SATA power output. OR they MAY require power from the mobo ARGB header in some cases. We need to know that answer from Lian Li Tech Support before we can design the full power and control connection system.
Im going to buy Asus Rog Crosshair VIII Dark Hero when its available. I don't know which fans should i buy for case fans but in my mind im going to buy something like 4 Arctic P14(140mm, 3 front intake, 1 rear exhaust) because they are good at price and performance. And im going to use NZXT Z73's 3 120mm Aer P120 stock fans for radiator on top. I have P500A DRGB Case with 3 stock fans(i don't know what should i do with them). I already bought 3 quantity of phanteks halos lux drgbs 120mm. I think im going to buy 4 quantity more 140mm phanteks halos lux drgb 140mms. Also i have Asus Rog Strix RTX 3080 OC version which is 3x8 pin. If they are compatible with my motherboard and video card i will buy 2 quantity of lian li strimer plus v2 24 pin version.

Amazon reviewers say about Lian Li Strimer Plus 24-pin V2:

Q: Do i connect the sata to psu or mb?
A: psu, its sata power not data
By Josh on September 15, 2020

Nice cable, but does not sync with MB!
By SunnyBenz on October 2, 2020Very disappointing after I took the time to route the cable in my already tight case, this cable also requires external power, so more wires plus I could not get it to sync with the MB MSI Mystic Light would change all the colors in my case except these cables. I connected it directly to the MB and I had to change the lights manually via the controller, really annoying. Ending up disconnecting it. see less
 

Paperdoc

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This will take more time and thinking, so I'll have to come back. But some first thoughts from what I've found.
1. The user comments on Amazon you have cited are not likely applicable to the Lian Li cables you are considering. Lian Li upgraded the product, so the newer version (V2) comes with different ways to power and control. The 24-pin cable comes with a manual control box and some connection cables. The main intent is that this box does not connect to any mobo header and just provides power and display control for the lights on the cable. It gets power for all the lights by a connection to a SATA power output from the PSU, and controls are done by use of four buttons on the box. So you have to be able to reach that box to make changes. The box actually has two extra outputs: one is a duplicate of the first output for this cable, and it is useful if you ALSO bought the dual 8-pin cable to feed your graphics card. That latter cable does NOT come with any control box of its own, but you can plug it into the box for the power cable. The third output actually uses a small adapter cable to provide a male (with pins) standard 3-pin ARGB output for any regular other ARGB lighting unit IF you want to power it from this box instead of from a mobo header. But here's the important add-on also included: it comes with a cable to connect the box to a mobo ARGB header so you CAN use a button on the box to turn over display control to the mobo header, instead of the box's displays. When you do that, it is almost certain that the power for the lighting along the cable(s) continues to come from the PSU, and it does NOT draw any significant current from the mobo header. So, whether you use that display option or not, this Lian Li lighted 24-pin cable does NOT draw power from the mobo header and we do NOT need to take it into account in the calculations.

The Lian Li 8-pin cable for a video card (it's actually a dual 8-pin cable) does not come with any power supply / controller box. IF you buy that alone (without the 24-pin cable and its box), your only way to power and control the video card cable is with a small adapter cable that DOES plug into a mobo ARGB header and DOES draw all its power from that header. IF you did that, then you certainly would have to take that into account on header load calculations. But I don't think you plan that.

I am not sure why you say you plan to buy two Lian Li 24-pin cables units. MAYBE your thought is that, since the video card has three 8-pin power input connectors, you can use the second 24-pin cable to make the connection from the PSU to the video card. I do not know how that video card is wired and how its connectors are designed. Just because the card has 24 holes on three 8-pin power sockets does not guarantee that a standard 24-pin mobo power cable will fit in there. But maybe they have designed the card that way. I leave that detail entirely to you.

One small note. In the reviews I watched, the reviewers felt that the displays the Lian Li controller box generated for their cables were more attractive than what the mobo headers can do with those lighting devices, so they actually preferred NOT to make use of the ability to sync the cable lights with their other fan lights in the case, even though that IS included as an option. If you choose not to sync up, then you will need to arrange the parts so that you can access the Lian Li control box to change cable light displays. Or, if you want to sync all of the lights all the time, access is not important once you have made the initial setting.

I'll come back to deal with the details for connecting the several fans, and the fan frame lighting units.
 
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I'm back with stuff on fans and lights and where / how to connect. We'll start with the LIGHTS.

You plan on having seven Phanteks Halos Lux frames - three 120mm for the top rad fans, and four 140 mm for the front and rear fans. Each of those has 30 LED's in the frame, so we can anticipate 0.6A max current per frame. The only other lighting components is in the PUMP unit, and it is powered and controlled separately by its own wiring and the NZXT CAM software, so it is NOT included in this part of the discussion. Your mobo has two AURA Addressable RGB Gen2 headers, one at top front and one at bottom centre. Each can provide up to 3.0 A max current. So, using only ARGB SPLITTERS (not an ARGB Hub), you can do this.

Now I also see you have to bonus features with those frames. One is that, although the frames use a non-standard connector, it comes with an adapter cable to fit a common mobo (4-1) pin header. But more importantly, each frame also is equipped with dual connectors so that you can daisy-chain them. This is as good as a Splitter. So, for the top three on the rad fans, you connect the first frame via its adapter cable to the mobo top front ARGB header. The second and third frames simply plug into the output connector on the frame of the previous. That puts all three on one header. The four case fan frames are a little trickier just because there is one at the rear, and connecting it to the front three in the daisy chain is not going to work. So you will need a simple 2-output ARGB Splitter. Here is an overkill example - a 2-pack of ones with four outputs

https://www.amazon.com/MICRO-CONNECTORS-Addressable-Splitter-Cable/dp/B083N5PGBK/ref=sr_1_10?dchild=1&keywords=ARGB+Splitter&qid=1606697660&sr=8-10

That gives you a spare, and extra outputs you will not use. Note that all of the connectors on these are female. But the set comes with eight gender-changer adapters to convert those to male outputs. I suggest that you convert only TWO outputs of the one Splitter you use, leaving the other two with no pins sticking out to touch something. Then put a little tape over the other unused ones to be sure they don't short out somewhere unexpectedly. Plug that Splitter into the bottom mobo ARGB header. Using the adapters with the frames, connect one output to the front three fan frames (these three in a single daisy chain), and the other to the single rear frame. That pits all four case fans on that one header

For both of these headers the max load is less than the 3.0 A limit. The displays of all seven fan frames will be controlled by the AURA SYNC utility supplied with your mobo.

Now, onward to the fan MOTORS and the AIO system PUMP. These all connect to mobo fan headers, of which there are three types. on your mobo. It has a CPU_FAN and a CPU_OPT header intended to control cooling of the CPU chip. Both of these base their automatic control on a temperature sensor inside the CPU chip itself. I suggest you plug into the CPU_FAN header the 3-pin (female) connector that comes from the multi-headed cable on the PUMP of your Kraken Z73 system. The NZXT CAM utility you download and install will expect to find the speed signal from the PUMP there. Although the mobo has an AIO_PUMP header, you probably should not use that. Then the mobo has three CHA_FANn headers for case ventilation fans, and these are guided by a different temp sensor on the mobo. These are where you can plug in your four case fans - 3 front, one rear. Now, since you have 4 fans, that is not quite matched up. BUT you also have a fourth header called H_AMP which is a special case fan header with a higher max load than normal. You do NOT need it extra capacity for anything, so just use it as a fourth case fan header. In this way EACH of your four case fans can be separately monitored and controlled. The fans you propose in these position - Arctic P14's - are THREE-pin fans, so for EACH of the headers they use, you will need to go into BIOS Setup and adjust an item called the header MODE. Set it to Voltage Control Mode (aka DC Mode), and not Auto or PWM. That's how a 3-pin fan's speed is controlled.

Now that leaves the three NZXT AER P120 fans on the rad that it came with. CPU fans in simpler systems are connected to and controlled by the CPU_FAN header. But in the Kraken Z73 system, you plug all three of these into a set of three 4-pin fan output (male) connectors on that multi-headed cable from the PUMP unit. From that PUMP you also connect one cable to a SATA power output connector from the PSU for power to the entire Kraken system (including the pump and the rad fans) , and a small cable to a mobo USB2 header. The CAM utility uses that cable to communicate with the Kraken system and control the rad fans and monitor the pump for possible failure.

The Kraken system multi-headed cable also has an output for ARGB lights IF you used such fans on the rad. But it is not clear whether that can handle the fan frames you are using; further, that would NOT allow you to sync the top rad fan frames with the other case frames that are controlled by the mobo ARGB headers. The Kraken CAM software WILL be how you control the display on top of the PUMP unit.

In summary, you connect seven fan frames to two mobo ARGB headers, using a combination of supplied adapter cables, one Splitter, and the daisy-chain features of the frames. All of these are controlled by the mobo's Aura Sync utility. The display system on top of the pump is powered and controlled separately by the CAM software and the pump's connection cables. The lights in the Lian Li 24-pin main power extension cable are powered and controlled by their own manual controller box unless you decide to feed it a mobo ARGB signal, which you can do from a third output of that ARGB Splitter used for the case fans' frames.

The three rad fans are powered from the connections on the PUMP unit, fed from the PSU. The NZXT CAM utility controls those fans to control CPU cooling. The four case fan motors are powered individually from four mobo fan headers, and these headers must be configured to use the older DC Mode for control of these 3-pin fans. Fan speeds for these are controlled on the basis of temperature on the mobo.
 
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Arctic P14's - are THREE-pin fans, so for EACH of the headers they use, you will need to go into BIOS Setup and adjust an item called the header MODE. Set it to Voltage Control Mode (aka DC Mode), and not Auto or PWM. That's how a 3-pin fan's speed is controlled.
Arctic P14's has PWM versions. Thank you for helping me.

That gives you a spare, and extra outputs you will not use. Note that all of the connectors on these are female. But the set comes with eight gender-changer adapters to convert those to male outputs. I suggest that you convert only TWO outputs of the one Splitter you use, leaving the other two with no pins sticking out to touch something. Then put a little tape over the other unused ones to be sure they don't short out somewhere unexpectedly. Plug that Splitter into the bottom mobo ARGB header. Using the adapters with the frames, connect one output to the front three fan frames (these three in a single daisy chain), and the other to the single rear frame. That pits all four case fans on that one header
Can i use powered hub instead of splitter? I don't know how to use that, it looks hard to use it. Can you recommend me one? Thanks again for helping.
 
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The Splitters I suggested are not hard to use. You would use only one of them, and really the only need for them is that you cannot expect to have the daisy-chain cable from the rear fan's frame reach all the way to the front of the case to hook up with those front frames. For that one splitter, you fit it with two of the little gender-changer adapters for the two groups of fan frames, and leave the other two Splitter outputs unused. IF you decide to connect the control box that comes with the Lian Li cables to a mobo control signal source to sync the displays, you can get that easily by adding a gender-changer adapter to a third Splitter output and connecting there. To use a powered ARGB Hub for the bottom groups (three front, one rear) of fan frames is really no simpler. You still would have all three front frames connected in a daisy chain to one Hub output, and the rear frame connected to another, with the possibility of using a third Hub output port for connection to the Lian Li system. In terms of power supply, you don't need the extra power available via a Hub.
 
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The Splitters I suggested are not hard to use. You would use only one of them, and really the only need for them is that you cannot expect to have the daisy-chain cable from the rear fan's frame reach all the way to the front of the case to hook up with those front frames. For that one splitter, you fit it with two of the little gender-changer adapters for the two groups of fan frames, and leave the other two Splitter outputs unused. IF you decide to connect the control box that comes with the Lian Li cables to a mobo control signal source to sync the displays, you can get that easily by adding a gender-changer adapter to a third Splitter output and connecting there. To use a powered ARGB Hub for the bottom groups (three front, one rear) of fan frames is really no simpler. You still would have all three front frames connected in a daisy chain to one Hub output, and the rear frame connected to another, with the possibility of using a third Hub output port for connection to the Lian Li system. In terms of power supply, you don't need the extra power available via a Hub.
Thank you so much. Can i ask last question before i leave? i hope i don't bother you. If i do, i am so sorry.

What should i do if i would like to use second Lian Li Strimer Plus 24-pin for video card. I didn't research properly and i don't know if the pins are compatible with my video card. But lets imagine its compatible and i decided to buy second 24-pin strimer plus.

Also can i use argb phanteks or asus rog led lights for my case?
 
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Paperdoc

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I really doubt that the 24-pin Lian Li Strimer Plus cable extension can be used to feed your video card. Basically, that video card has three 8-pin power input ports on it. I fully expect that each of those is a common 8-pin standard video card power port, and you can use ONLY the matching cable direct from the PSU to feed into each of these. I bet you can NOT fit the end of the 24-pin mobo main power cable into those three side-by-side 8-pin sockets on the video card. Even if you could plug in, I REALLY would NOT do that until you do find out how this is supposed to be done.

The first thing you should do is find out whether you need to feed power into all three of those sockets. My understanding is that, on many such cards, the two or three identical sockets are actually in parallel with each other so that you CAN plug in as many cables as possible, but you do not HAVE TO. It depends on how many such cables are available from your PSU, and on how you will be using your video card. To get that answer (how many must you connect to?) AND can you really do that with a main mobo 24-pin power cable?, you should contact Tech Support for your video card. You might also ask them just how much power that card does need? THEN you need to check how many cables your PSU has for this purpose, and you MAY want to verify with the PSU maker whether it can supply the power your video card requires. Remember that the Lian Li video card power cable extension calls itself an 8-pin cable, but I believe (you should check this!) that it really is TWO 8-pin power cables in parallel so that you can use it to connect TWO cables from your PSU to two video card ports.

I presume your last query is whether or not you can use ARGB LED strips from either of those companies. The answer is yes, and I'll call your attention to some factors on electrical load. In each case, the light strip comes with a cable to connect between the slightly non-standard connector on the strip and the common 3-pin mobo header, so connections are not too complicated. IF you get a kit of two or more strips, you may be able to use their daisy-chain connector system between strips.

The ASUS ROG Addressable LED strip comes in two models: 30 cm length with 15 LED's, and 60 cm length with 30 LED's. Recall that each LED will consume at max 0.020 A, so that's 0.30 or 0.60 A max load per strip for those models.

The Phanteks Digital RGB Neon LED Kit comes in three models:
their COMBO set is two strips of 40 cm length, 28 LED's (056 A per strip);
their M5 set is a single strip of 55 cm length with 38 LED's (0.76A), and,
their M1 set is a single strip of 100 cm (1 m) length with 70 LED's (1.40A).

Now, your plan to use 4 Phanteks LUX frames (30 LED's, 0.60 A each, 2.4 A total) on one header and three such frames on the other header (1.8 A total) leaves you with about 1 A (or a bit more available on that latter header to connect LED strips. Bear that in mind in planning to add more lights. If you need MORE than the spare 1 A available, then you WILL need to get into a powered ARGB Hub for that.

This is not a bother, so don't apologize.
 
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Pronalt

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I really doubt that the 24-pin Lian Li Strimer Plus cable extension can be used to feed your video card. Basically, that video card has three 8-pin power input ports on it. I fully expect that each of those is a common 8-pin standard video card power port, and you can use ONLY the matching cable direct from the PSU to feed into each of these. I bet you can NOT fit the end of the 24-pin mobo main power cable into those three side-by-side 8-pin sockets on the video card. Even if you could plug in, I REALLY would NOT do that until you do find out how this is supposed to be done.

The first thing you should do is find out whether you need to feed power into all three of those sockets. My understanding is that, on many such cards, the two or three identical sockets are actually in parallel with each other so that you CAN plug in as many cables as possible, but you do not HAVE TO. It depends on how many such cables are available from your PSU, and on how you will be using your video card. To get that answer (how many must you connect to?) AND can you really do that with a main mobo 24-pin power cable?, you should contact Tech Support for your video card. You might also ask them just how much power that card does need? THEN you need to check how many cables your PSU has for this purpose, and you MAY want to verify with the PSU maker whether it can supply the power your video card requires. Remember that the Lian Li video card power cable extension calls itself an 8-pin cable, but I believe (you should check this!) that it really is TWO 8-pin power cables in parallel so that you can use it to connect TWO cables from your PSU to two video card ports.

I presume your last query is whether or not you can use ARGB LED strips from either of those companies. The answer is yes, and I'll call your attention to some factors on electrical load. In each case, the light strip comes with a cable to connect between the slightly non-standard connector on the strip and the common 3-pin mobo header, so connections are not too complicated. IF you get a kit of two or more strips, you may be able to use their daisy-chain connector system between strips.

The ASUS ROG Addressable LED strip comes in two models: 30 cm length with 15 LED's, and 60 cm length with 30 LED's. Recall that each LED will consume at max 0.020 A, so that's 0.30 or 0.60 A max load per strip for those models.

The Phanteks Digital RGB Neon LED Kit comes in three models:
their COMBO set is two strips of 40 cm length, 28 LED's (056 A per strip);
their M5 set is a single strip of 55 cm length with 38 LED's (0.76A), and,
their M1 set is a single strip of 100 cm (1 m) length with 70 LED's (1.40A).

Now, your plan to use 4 Phanteks LUX frames (30 LED's, 0.60 A each, 2.4 A total) on one header and three such frames on the other header (1.8 A total) leaves you with about 1 A (or a bit more available on that latter header to connect LED strips. Bear that in mind in planning to add more lights. If you need MORE than the spare 1 A available, then you WILL need to get into a powered ARGB Hub for that.

This is not a bother, so don't apologize.
Thank you. I found 2 hubs, i don't know which one should i buy. Im going to buy 4 Phanteks Digital Halos Lux 140mm, 3 120mm digital halos lux, only one lian li strimer plus 24-pin, i decided to not buy 8-pin for gpu. 1 argb gpu holding bracket and 2 led strips for p500a. And my case is P500A DRGB model which has built with a led strip on the side of the case. Also can i plug second hub to my motherboard? Thank you again. You answered my all question.

The ARGB 5v 3-pin hubs i found:

https://www.silverstonetek.com/product.php?pid=869&bno=128&tb=53&area=en#undefined2

https://www.amazon.com/SilverStone-Technology-Addressable-Supports-Devices/dp/B07W6BKW8G

https://www.amazon.com/Razer-Chroma-Addressable-Controller-Compatibility/dp/B08KC2VZ2V/ref=sr_1_15?dchild=1&keywords=addressable+rgb+hub&qid=1607258282&sr=8-15
 

Paperdoc

Glorious
Ambassador
You can use two such powered Hubs in your system. Each Hub draws no power from the mobo header and only gets the control signal from the mobo, so there is effectively no mobo header power limit on using the Hubs. There is simply the Hub's limit of power it can draw from a SATA power connector source. However, I think you can do ALL of that with ONE of those Silverstone powered hubs on one mobo ARGB header, and a few extension cables just to reach from the Hub to the lighting devices. That's a big case, so reaching from a single Hub location to all areas of the case can require longer cables than come with your frames, etc. I'll give details below.

Just a couple things first. The first two items you linked to are the same - the Silverstone 8-port powered ARGB Hub. One is the maker's page, the other is a seller. The third link to the Razer Chroma unit is NOT what you need. It is not merely a Hub, it is a Controller for use when you do NOT have any mobo ARGB header to use. But more importantly, it is for the OTHER type of light, the plain RGB system with FOUR-pin connectors and using a 12 VDC power line. That Silverstone unit will do this job well. It surprises me a little because it claims it can handle a total load up to 9A, split into two groups of 4.5 A each side. A commonly-recognized limit with SATA power connections is that their contacts can only supply up to 4.5 A, but that is for ONE of the voltage sources. I guess this hub uses the 5 VDC source lines for half of its power, and the 12 VDC lines for the other half by making a Voltage adjustment inside the Hub. The only caution is that you should not exceed 4.5 A per SIDE of the Hub and try to balance the total load between the two sides.

To reach from the Hub to where the lighting units are, I suggest you get some ARGB Extension cables, like this

https://www.amazon.com/Micro-Connectors-Addressable-Extension-Cable/dp/B083N212HC/ref=sr_1_3?crid=N9AO8TDE4MPW&dchild=1&keywords=addressable+rgb+extension+cable&qid=1607307359&sprefix=addressable+rgb+extension,aps,185&sr=8-3

That is a 2-pack of cables 50 cm long, including four gender-changer adapters. (That is odd, because you should only need one adapter to ONE end of each cable for it to work.) There is also a shorter (30 cm) version of this kit. Get TWO of these 2-packs for 4 cables total.

So, here is how you can connect all this.
  1. The three top rad fans' frames should be daisy-chained together. The three front ones go together as a second daisy-chain. From the first frame in each, use the supplied adapter cable to convert their connection to the standard (4-1) connector type, and that will be a female. Leave the rear fan as a third separate lighting "group" with its own adapter cable, too.
  2. Connect one of the Extension Cables to each of those three frame groups, so they can reach the Hub location.
  3. Install the Silverstone Hub where you want so your cables (with extension cords) can reach it. Connect the Hub's SATA power input cable to a PSU SATA power output. Connect the supplied cable from the Hub's digital signal input port to ONE of your mobo's ARGB headers.
  4. Plug the Extension cable from one of the group of three fan frames into one side of the Hub. Plug the Extension cable from the single rear fan frame into the port beside that. So now the load on that first side is 4 frames or 2.4 A. Plug the Extension cable from the other group of three frames into a port on the OTHER side of the Hub. That load is 1.8 A.
  5. I presume the light strips you plan to use come with a cable to connect the two of them in their own daisy chain, so together they need only one connection to the Hub. Plug the cable (MAYBE an Extension cable) for the light strips you're adding into the SAME side as the single plug so far. We are trying for that load balance between sides. I don't know exactly which light strips you are buying, but the load of two strips could be 1.12A (two 40 cm) or 1.52 A (two 55 cm) if you're buying the Phanteks ones discussed above, or some other load you can calculate. That puts the load on side 2 at 2.9 or 3.3 A, or something else depending on details.
  6. Plug the cable from the ARGB GPU support bracket into Side 1 to add a little more load on that side - we don't know exactly what that is, but it won't be huge. So far we have used up three output ports on each side of the Hub.
  7. The case comes with a LED light on it that is powered from case control buttons on the top. The power for that is done by another cable from there to a PSU SATA output, so it does not draw power from the mobo. The case also includes a cable that can connect to a mobo ARGB header solely for allowing you to sync the case light strip with all your other lights. So plug that into the last port on one side of your Hub.
8 The Lian Li 24-pin power extension cable system also gets its power directly from a PSU SATA power output and draws no power from a mobo header. And it, also, comes with a cable to connect its manual control box to a mobo ARGB header to allow you to sync its display with the rest of your light system. So plug that one into the last output port on the other side of your Hub.

This arrangement connects all of your lighting units to that one Hub, which uses a single connection to one of your mobo ARGB headers to get its control signal, but does not actually load that header. The second mobo ARGB header is not even used for now. For the lighted strip on the case exterior and for the Lian Li power cable, you have the options of syncing them with the other case lights, or using the controllers they come with.

All together, this arrangement needs connections to three SATA power output connectors from the PSU. If you have that many available, no problem. But if you need to add some, I suggest one of two options. The first is to use one of these SATA power Splitters to convert one SATA output into two (a two-pack)

https://www.amazon.com/Benfei-Power-Y-Splitter-Cable-Inches/dp/B07ML447FG/ref=sr_1_6?dchild=1&keywords=SATA+power+splitter&qid=1607310544&sr=8-6

The Silverstone Hub by itself will use most of the capacity of one SATA power output connector, so I suggest you connect that alone to one SATA output. Then use the Splitter to power the Lian Li and case SATA needs.

Better yet, get two of this type of Splitter (also a 2-pack)

https://www.amazon.com/SDTC-Tech-Splitter-Adapter-Extension/dp/B07P12ZBYX/ref=sr_1_22?dchild=1&keywords=SATA+power+splitter&qid=1607311055&sr=8-22

It gets power from a 4-pin Molex output from the PSU (which can supply more total load than a PSU SATA output), and you probably do not have many devices already using Molex outputs from the PSU. BUT you may not plan to have ANY 4-pin Molex outputs - depends on your PSU and plans. IF you use these, use one to power the Hub, and the other to power the Lian Li and case lighting units.
 
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Pronalt

Prominent
Jul 15, 2019
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You can use two such powered Hubs in your system. Each Hub draws no power from the mobo header and only gets the control signal from the mobo, so there is effectively no mobo header power limit on using the Hubs. There is simply the Hub's limit of power it can draw from a SATA power connector source. However, I think you can do ALL of that with ONE of those Silverstone powered hubs on one mobo ARGB header, and a few extension cables just to reach from the Hub to the lighting devices. That's a big case, so reaching from a single Hub location to all areas of the case can require longer cables than come with your frames, etc. I'll give details below.

Just a couple things first. The first two items you linked to are the same - the Silverstone 8-port powered ARGB Hub. One is the maker's page, the other is a seller. The third link to the Razer Chroma unit is NOT what you need. It is not merely a Hub, it is a Controller for use when you do NOT have any mobo ARGB header to use. But more importantly, it is for the OTHER type of light, the plain RGB system with FOUR-pin connectors and using a 12 VDC power line. That Silverstone unit will do this job well. It surprises me a little because it claims it can handle a total load up to 9A, split into two groups of 4.5 A each side. A commonly-recognized limit with SATA power connections is that their contacts can only supply up to 4.5 A, but that is for ONE of the voltage sources. I guess this hub uses the 5 VDC source lines for half of its power, and the 12 VDC lines for the other half by making a Voltage adjustment inside the Hub. The only caution is that you should not exceed 4.5 A per SIDE of the Hub and try to balance the total load between the two sides.

To reach from the Hub to where the lighting units are, I suggest you get some ARGB Extension cables, like this

https://www.amazon.com/Micro-Connectors-Addressable-Extension-Cable/dp/B083N212HC/ref=sr_1_3?crid=N9AO8TDE4MPW&dchild=1&keywords=addressable+rgb+extension+cable&qid=1607307359&sprefix=addressable+rgb+extension,aps,185&sr=8-3

That is a 2-pack of cables 50 cm long, including four gender-changer adapters. (That is odd, because you should only need one adapter to ONE end of each cable for it to work.) There is also a shorter (30 cm) version of this kit. Get TWO of these 2-packs for 4 cables total.

So, here is how you can connect all this.
  1. The three top rad fans' frames should be daisy-chained together. The three front ones go together as a second daisy-chain. From the first frame in each, use the supplied adapter cable to convert their connection to the standard (4-1) connector type, and that will be a female. Leave the rear fan as a third separate lighting "group" with its own adapter cable, too.
  2. Connect one of the Extension Cables to each of those three frame groups, so they can reach the Hub location.
  3. Install the Silverstone Hub where you want so your cables (with extension cords) can reach it. Connect the Hub's SATA power input cable to a PSU SATA power output. Connect the supplied cable from the Hub's digital signal input port to ONE of your mobo's ARGB headers.
  4. Plug the Extension cable from one of the group of three fan frames into one side of the Hub. Plug the Extension cable from the single rear fan frame into the port beside that. So now the load on that first side is 4 frames or 2.4 A. Plug the Extension cable from the other group of three frames into a port on the OTHER side of the Hub. That load is 1.8 A.
  5. I presume the light strips you plan to use come with a cable to connect the two of them in their own daisy chain, so together they need only one connection to the Hub. Plug the cable (MAYBE an Extension cable) for the light strips you're adding into the SAME side as the single plug so far. We are trying for that load balance between sides. I don't know exactly which light strips you are buying, but the load of two strips could be 1.12A (two 40 cm) or 1.52 A (two 55 cm) if you're buying the Phanteks ones discussed above, or some other load you can calculate. That puts the load on side 2 at 2.9 or 3.3 A, or something else depending on details.
  6. Plug the cable from the ARGB GPU support bracket into Side 1 to add a little more load on that side - we don't know exactly what that is, but it won't be huge. So far we have used up three output ports on each side of the Hub.
  7. The case comes with a LED light on it that is powered from case control buttons on the top. The power for that is done by another cable from there to a PSU SATA output, so it does not draw power from the mobo. The case also includes a cable that can connect to a mobo ARGB header solely for allowing you to sync the case light strip with all your other lights. So plug that into the last port on one side of your Hub.
8 The Lian Li 24-pin power extension cable system also gets its power directly from a PSU SATA power output and draws no power from a mobo header. And it, also, comes with a cable to connect its manual control box to a mobo ARGB header to allow you to sync its display with the rest of your light system. So plug that one into the last output port on the other side of your Hub.

This arrangement connects all of your lighting units to that one Hub, which uses a single connection to one of your mobo ARGB headers to get its control signal, but does not actually load that header. The second mobo ARGB header is not even used for now. For the lighted strip on the case exterior and for the Lian Li power cable, you have the options of syncing them with the other case lights, or using the controllers they come with.

All together, this arrangement needs connections to three SATA power output connectors from the PSU. If you have that many available, no problem. But if you need to add some, I suggest one of two options. The first is to use one of these SATA power Splitters to convert one SATA output into two (a two-pack)

https://www.amazon.com/Benfei-Power-Y-Splitter-Cable-Inches/dp/B07ML447FG/ref=sr_1_6?dchild=1&keywords=SATA+power+splitter&qid=1607310544&sr=8-6

The Silverstone Hub by itself will use most of the capacity of one SATA power output connector, so I suggest you connect that alone to one SATA output. Then use the Splitter to power the Lian Li and case SATA needs.

Better yet, get two of this type of Splitter (also a 2-pack)

https://www.amazon.com/SDTC-Tech-Splitter-Adapter-Extension/dp/B07P12ZBYX/ref=sr_1_22?dchild=1&keywords=SATA+power+splitter&qid=1607311055&sr=8-22

It gets power from a 4-pin Molex output from the PSU (which can supply more total load than a PSU SATA output), and you probably do not have many devices already using Molex outputs from the PSU. BUT you may not plan to have ANY 4-pin Molex outputs - depends on your PSU and plans. IF you use these, use one to power the Hub, and the other to power the Lian Li and case lighting units.
Thank you so much.

Update: I bought Asus Rog Strix X570-E Motherboard because i couldn't find Rog Crosshair VIII Dark Hero. Do i need anything else for this motherboard or am i good to go? Thank you again you are so much helpful.
 

Paperdoc

Glorious
Ambassador
No real changes. I'll just draw your attention to the fact that mobo has TWO ARGB headers, items 8 on p. 1-2 of the manual. One is on the front edge near the top, and the other at the bottom front corner. Do not try to use the 4-pin headers (items 5).
 
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