[SOLVED] What is the real temperature of my 3900x

Bububear

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Aug 18, 2014
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So I've recentrly bought a 3900x it all runs well and everything but I'm having problems with actually monitoring the real temperatures. I have no idea what the real tempereature is and what sensor to actually monitor. My cpu is watercooled with a 280 aio from corsair. Here are the idle temps monitored with 2 different programs View: https://imgur.com/a/0m3VF17
Note the TMPIN 4 on the left is Temp2 on the right. Not sure about their hight value and why that is so high (82 is a bit to much but they never seem to change values so i think it's just a faulty sensor that is set to a default value or maybe its that the junction temp? i have no idea). Then on the left there is also a Temp 5 that again has a high value (86C) that also never seems to change.
Now here are the temps after 20+ minutes of stresstesting the whole system. View: https://imgur.com/JHqHbQf
This time I monitored the temps with 4 different softwares. The abnormal value that seem to have changed are the values that both HW software share (TMPIN 4 on the left is Temp2 on the right have gone from 82 to 84 and this is also seen in the corsair software, and this is why i think that is the junction temp that got people woried a while back but then again i'm not sure.). That being said what temp should i actually keep an eye on? should i just take the ryzen master default and basic temp and not worry about anything or is there more to it? Also i've searched a bit on forums and apperently there are a few "problems" with the cpu sensors on the 3900x as so many people have problems reading the temperatures. Thanks for reading.
 
So I've recentrly bought a 3900x it all runs well and everything but I'm having problems with actually monitoring the real temperatures. I have no idea what the real tempereature is and what sensor to actually monitor. ...
The correct CPU temperature to monitor is CPU (Tctl/Tdie), that's the temp that would generally be used to control fans. There is also CPU CCD 1 (Tdie) or CPU CCD 2 (Tdie), they are temperatures of the two CCD's of a 3900. Some motherboards have an external temp sensor somewhere around or under the CPU, but that's way to slow to be anything more than a curiousity.

The Tctl temp isn't actually one sensor, but the highest at the moment of the many that are scattered around the CPU. I think that's true of CCD 1 and CCD 2 too but there's not much written about them. The thing about Zen2 is it's super quick (up to 1 mS intervals) to make changes in boost clock based on the many temp sensors, voltage and processing loads. So the sensors have to be extremely close to the action to be of any use.

So far, only HWInfo64 reliably reports the correct temp sensors of Zen2. Similarly, only HWInfo reports the most reliable core voltage which is CPU Core Voltage (SVI2 TFN). That's the actual internal voltage provided by the CPU itself in telemetry.
 

jon96789

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Aug 17, 2019
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First of all, you are not supposed to run several monitoring apps at once as it skews the readings. Ryzen Master is supposed to be the most accurate, but CPU-ID's CPU and HW6info's CPU PKG temps all seem to correlate. I have a 3900X with the H115i RGB Platinum. What is the max CPU temp that you have hit with the Corsair? My CPU has hit about 95+ degrees under encoding load which I feel is too high...
 

Bububear

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Aug 18, 2014
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First of all, you are not supposed to run several monitoring apps at once as it skews the readings. Ryzen Master is supposed to be the most accurate, but CPU-ID's CPU and HW6info's CPU PKG temps all seem to correlate. I have a 3900X with the H115i RGB Platinum. What is the max CPU temp that you have hit with the Corsair? My CPU has hit about 95+ degrees under encoding load which I feel is too high...
Yea there is literally no difference between running the apps individually and running them all at once (tested it and yes they do acces the same sensors and some of them are aware that another app uses the same sensor but in my case the readings were the same)
Also for the sake of not posting a million pictures i ran all of the apps at once as some of them show a larger amount of sensors and some of them just throw a overall temperature at you that u have no idea where it came from. And to answer the question about my max CPU temp... that's the whole point of this post, in the 2nd picture you can see the temps i have on the corsair link after 20+ minutes of prime95 but which sensor do u consider as being the overall/average/most important etc... the ryzen master for example tells me it hit 76 max so there's that...
 
So I've recentrly bought a 3900x it all runs well and everything but I'm having problems with actually monitoring the real temperatures. I have no idea what the real tempereature is and what sensor to actually monitor. ...
The correct CPU temperature to monitor is CPU (Tctl/Tdie), that's the temp that would generally be used to control fans. There is also CPU CCD 1 (Tdie) or CPU CCD 2 (Tdie), they are temperatures of the two CCD's of a 3900. Some motherboards have an external temp sensor somewhere around or under the CPU, but that's way to slow to be anything more than a curiousity.

The Tctl temp isn't actually one sensor, but the highest at the moment of the many that are scattered around the CPU. I think that's true of CCD 1 and CCD 2 too but there's not much written about them. The thing about Zen2 is it's super quick (up to 1 mS intervals) to make changes in boost clock based on the many temp sensors, voltage and processing loads. So the sensors have to be extremely close to the action to be of any use.

So far, only HWInfo64 reliably reports the correct temp sensors of Zen2. Similarly, only HWInfo reports the most reliable core voltage which is CPU Core Voltage (SVI2 TFN). That's the actual internal voltage provided by the CPU itself in telemetry.
 

Bububear

Honorable
Aug 18, 2014
23
0
10,510
0
The correct CPU temperature to monitor is CPU (Tctl/Tdie), that's the temp that would generally be used to control fans. There is also CPU CCD 1 (Tdie) or CPU CCD 2 (Tdie), they are temperatures of the two CCD's of a 3900. Some motherboards have an external temp sensor somewhere around or under the CPU, but that's way to slow to be anything more than a curiousity.

The Tctl temp isn't actually one sensor, but the highest at the moment of the many that are scattered around the CPU. I think that's true of CCD 1 and CCD 2 too but there's not much written about them. The thing about Zen2 is it's super quick (up to 1 mS intervals) to make changes in boost clock based on the many temp sensors, voltage and processing loads. So the sensors have to be extremely close to the action to be of any use.

So far, only HWInfo64 reliably reports the correct temp sensors of Zen2. Similarly, only HWInfo reports the most reliable core voltage which is CPU Core Voltage (SVI2 TFN). That's the actual internal voltage provided by the CPU itself in telemetry.
So i did what u said and followed the CPU (Tctl/Tdie) sensor and I also discoverd that the 2 CCDs are represented in the corsair software as temp #8 and #6( if this helps anyone ever reading this or if anyone cares)but corsair does update the sensors slower than HW. View: https://imgur.com/a/Ul0FViO
I also did not find a CPU (Tctl/Tdie) in corsair or a temp that would corespond to it and update the same way the 2 sensors update as the CCDs in HWInfo64 do. While i know i will rarely or almost never get 100% utilisation i will get some high % of cpu stress while fiddleing with some rendering software that i'm trying to learn atm. Thanks for the info ill try monitoring that but the temps seem good enough for me that i dont need to worry i feel like.
 
....but corsair does update the sensors slower than HW....
You can adjust the HWInfo sampling frequency to 500 mS (2000 mS is default). Or even to 200 mS, but I think that starts to influence processor performance a bit. Then also drag a graph to the desktop and monitor the changes over time as it runs a render task, for instance.

If you do go with more frequent sampling intervals you should disable all sensors you're not concerned with. I feel most people agree that removing motherboard monitoring software is, in general, a benefit to performance. Not sure of Asus' but it sure was with my Gigabyte and MSI boards.
 

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