News What Is Thunderbolt 4? Tiger Lake Tech Isn't Faster, Thunderbolt 3 With a New Name

jgraham11

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Standard Intel misleading advertising: Make it look like its new and faster but meanwhile its not and you have to look into the fine print to determine that.

Same stuff as last year, remember Intel presenting their 28 core, 56 thread monster running at 5GHz, like this is a real product but then "forgetting" to mention the chip demoed was overclocked and chilled using an industrial chiller...
 
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truerock

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It is very important to note that USB 4.0, HDMI 2.1 and DisplayPort 2.0 all have about the same throughput (approximately 40 gigabit). Ethernet is somewhat stuck at 10gBASE-T, 10 gigabit (because it is typically used over longer distances).

Having all this duplicate technology is a complete waste of time and just encourages dotard, foot-dragging types to hang on to obsolete technology.
 
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Ninjawithagun

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It is very important to note that USB 4.0, HDMI 2.1 and DisplayPort 2.0 all have about the same throughput (approximately 40 gigabit). Ethernet is somewhat stuck at 10gBASE-T, 10 gigabit (because it is typically used over longer distances).

Having all this duplicate technology is a complete waste of time and just encourages dotard, foot-dragging types to hang on to obsolete technology.
I find it ironic that modems and routers are still 'stuck' with 1gBASE-T ports. Currently, the only way to attain multi-gig (in this case, only 2 gig) connectivity from a standard modem or router is the use of link aggregration via Cat cables. Sad.
 

spongiemaster

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Standard Intel misleading advertising: Make it look like its new and faster but meanwhile its not and you have to look into the fine print to determine that.
You mean like AMD's and to a lesser extent Nvidia's video card rebranding? This practice is an industry standard. Don't act like Intel does this any more than everyone else in the industry does.
 

spongiemaster

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I find it ironic that modems and routers are still 'stuck' with 1gBASE-T ports. Currently, the only way to attain multi-gig (in this case, only 2 gig) connectivity from a standard modem or router is the use of link aggregration via Cat cables. Sad.
How many people have multi-gig internet? That's why we don't see modems with multi-gig ports. If the modem doesn't support the speed, there is no point putting a faster ethernet port on it. Sames goes for the router. There are a few with a multi-gig port. That I think is dumb. If you don't have at least 2 multi-gig ports, what's the point? Again, because the router is the entry point into your network for your internet connection which is unlikely to be more than 1gb, higher port speeds don't really matter. It's easy to connect a multi-gig switch to your router.

The problem is 10gig ethernet equipment is still ridiculously expensive. If you want a switch with more than 2 ports, there are very few options below $500. When you can buy a 24 port gigabit netgear switch for $135, dropping $350 for their entry level 5 port 10gb switch is a hard pill to swallow. An 8 port is $500. That's $150 to add three more ports. Then you also have to add in the $100+ cost of a 10gb nic for every PC, and the cost per port is well beyond what most people would be willing to spend on home network gear.
 

Ninjawithagun

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Doesn't matter how many people have multi-gig internet service. You are forgetting about those who use multi-gig ethernet within their home networks. Whether it be used for media streaming from their file server to backing up data. Multi-gig routers are already here and two models have it. WiFi has had multi-gig for over a year now, so there is that. You are missing the point that people do need it. Hardware prices for ethernet multi-gig are coming down fast, so arguing about cost is pointless. And almost all of the newer motherboards have an integrated multi-gig ethernet port (2.5G, 5G, or 10G port, depending on the model) out of the box. Multi-gig is the future, whether you like it or not.
 

spongiemaster

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Doesn't matter how many people have multi-gig internet service.
Apparently, I'm missing something. What is the benefit of a modem with a multi-gig port if you don't have multi-gig internet?

You are forgetting about those who use multi-gig ethernet within their home networks. Whether it be used for media streaming from their file server to backing up data.
No, I haven't. I said it was easy to add a a multi-gig switch to your network. The speed of the router ports is irrelevant if all your multi-gig equipment is connected to the multi-gig switch.

Multi-gig routers are already here and two models have it.
When I looked a few months back, I couldn't find any. What consumer routers have more than 1 multi-gig port on them?

WiFi has had multi-gig for over a year now, so there is that.
Assume you mean WiGig which has terrible industry support (1 cellphone? I think from Asus) and no one uses it. The few routers that support it, don't have multi-gig ports. Who is going to connect their file server or whatever to their network with WiFi?

You are missing the point that people do need it.
I never said people don't need it.

Hardware prices for ethernet multi-gig are coming down fast, so arguing about cost is pointless.
If you want used SFP+ equipment, sure. If you want new RJ-45 based equipment, prices have gone nowhere. Netgear's 5 port switch (cheapest switch with at least 4 RJ-45 ports) was released at $400 in 2017. It was selling for $400 as recently as last month on Amazon, though it regularly fluctuates between $400 and $340. It hit about $345 in the summer of 2018 which is $5 lower than its current $350 price. Prices are not dropping at all.

And almost all of the newer motherboards have an integrated multi-gig ethernet port (2.5G, 5G, or 10G port, depending on the model) out of the box.
No, they do not. 9 out of 60 Z390 boards have a multi-gig port on Newegg, which is supposed to be the highend enthusiast boards. It's not much better on the AM4 side.

Multi-gig is the future, whether you like it or not.
Again, never said it wasn't.
 
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Feb 29, 2020
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It is very important to note that USB 4.0, HDMI 2.1 and DisplayPort 2.0 all have about the same throughput (approximately 40 gigabit). Ethernet is somewhat stuck at 10gBASE-T, 10 gigabit (because it is typically used over longer distances).

Having all this duplicate technology is a complete waste of time and just encourages dotard, foot-dragging types to hang on to obsolete technology.
Nearly. DP2.0 allows up to 77G ? But already using the Thunderbolt physical protocol (20G per unidirectional lane).

In fact I wonder if Tiger Lake or other USB4 Stuff will come with DP2.0. For Tiger Lake this would mean additional SerDes/DMA and 4 line out drivers instead of two - per TB4 port. I'm not sure if USB4 again allows for alternate Modes like that (DP2.0 77G) just like TB3 did allow for alternate Modes, or if it restricts to two lanes in each direction, total 40G transmit and 40G receive in order to be ready for optical transmission.
 

spongiemaster

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I run 10gb equipment in my home. I did the research leading up to those purchases. That's how I know you're wrong on pretty much every point you made. I said exactly where you were wrong, and you chose to not dispute a single point, because prices, availability, etc, are not opinions that can be debated, they're just facts.
 
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