[SOLVED] What is "Total System power" in hwinfo software??????

Apr 6, 2021
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lol. that isn't helpful. slaps HWINFO for lacking meaningful explanations.
you can't even tell if each value has different meanings like my example. I assume they would have spelled that out then.
you could ask on their forums? or find another way to find what you are after
In my opinion Total system power is the power draw by all of the components combined (fan, display , cpu etc.)
I stressed cpu and checked battery discharge rate and total system power at the same time. Those values are nearly same not exact same but nearly same. These are images link:
image 1
image 2
image 3
image 4
 
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Colif

Win 10 Master
Moderator
is this a laptop?
I don't have that header and a short search shows it might be a laptop thing.


I am not sure what it measures, the current score looks too low to be total, but i could be wrong. My CPU alone uses more at idle.
 
Apr 6, 2021
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is this a laptop?
I don't have that header and a short search shows it might be a laptop thing.


I am not sure what it measures, the current score looks too low to be total, but i could be wrong. My CPU alone uses more at idle.
Yes this is a laptop. Using i5 1135g7 processor having tdp 28watt. So there may be a chance that it may be total power consumption including display, dimm, cpu etc. (but dont have actual idea what it is)
 

Colif

Win 10 Master
Moderator
No one is actually saying what it represents. I know when I start hwinfo it shows tooltips for all the values, so perhaps hover over value and see what it says it represents
For example:
 

Colif

Win 10 Master
Moderator
lol. that isn't helpful. slaps HWINFO for lacking meaningful explanations.
you can't even tell if each value has different meanings like my example. I assume they would have spelled that out then.
you could ask on their forums? or find another way to find what you are after
 
Apr 6, 2021
51
2
45
1
lol. that isn't helpful. slaps HWINFO for lacking meaningful explanations.
you can't even tell if each value has different meanings like my example. I assume they would have spelled that out then.
you could ask on their forums? or find another way to find what you are after
True, they should give proper explanation for every property.
Thanks for your responses.
I will check it by some another method and if found any proper answer then I will post it here.
Will you tell me some ques regarding tdp in this thread or I should start a new one???
 
Apr 6, 2021
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you can ask question about TDP, i see if I can answer it :)
11th gen i5 processor 1135g7 has its base clock 2.4Ghz @28watt tdp
For my laptop 1135g7 base clock is also 2.4Ghz. But what i checked in hwinfo POWER LIMIT 1 is 22watt for 28sec and PL2 is 51watt.
Is this PL1 22watt is tdp or it is power consumption??? Also what is the significance of this PL1 value and when it come into use????
I have seen some other laptop with same processor (1135g7) but having lesser base clock i.e 1.4Ghz. Their PL1 value is 15watt and PL2 value is 51watt. Is this mean they will produce less at the cost of performance????
 
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Colif

Win 10 Master
Moderator
PL1 is the effective long-term expected steady state power consumption of a processor. For all intents and purposes, the PL1 is usually defined as the TDP of a processor. So if the TDP is 80W, then PL1 is 80W.
PL2 is the short-term maximum power draw for a processor. This number is higher than PL1, and the processor goes into this state when a workload is applied, allowing the processor to use its turbo modes up to the maximum PL2 value. This means that if Intel has defined a processor with a series of turbo modes, they will only work when PL2 is the driving variable for maximum power consumption. Turbo does not work in PL1 mode.
https://www.anandtech.com/show/13544/why-intel-processors-draw-more-power-than-expected-tdp-turbo

if you use throttlestop the values in HWINFO might be wrong

Their PL1 value is 15watt and PL2 value is 51watt. Is this mean they will produce less at the cost of performance????
no, it means they run slower unless they need to turbo boost and then they can run up to 51 watts max power in turbo modes.
 
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Eximo

Titan
Ambassador
Pulling the current flowing out of the battery would be pretty easy in a laptop. Laptops predict charging rates which would require total system power consumption to compare to incoming power.

I'll see if I can find some of the commands, been a while since I've done this.

Powershell:

powercfg /batteryreport /output "C:\battery-report.html"

Hmm, my battery is at roughly 60% capability. Don't use the battery that often though.

And all the fun power stats (comes out as System Power Report):

powercfg /sleepstudy /output "C:\sleepstudy-report.html"

All there, logged somewhere. So further confirmation it is a real value. Going to poke around and see if I can find a way to get a live status.
 
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Reactions: Nikhilniks
Apr 6, 2021
51
2
45
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lol. that isn't helpful. slaps HWINFO for lacking meaningful explanations.
you can't even tell if each value has different meanings like my example. I assume they would have spelled that out then.
you could ask on their forums? or find another way to find what you are after
In my opinion Total system power is the power draw by all of the components combined (fan, display , cpu etc.)
I stressed cpu and checked battery discharge rate and total system power at the same time. Those values are nearly same not exact same but nearly same. These are images link:
image 1
image 2
image 3
image 4
 
Reactions: Krotow

Eximo

Titan
Ambassador
You are probably seeing conversion losses from ~20V down to 12V, 5V, 3.3V and ~2V->1.25V. That would account for the discrepancy.

Apparently the source code for Open Hardware Monitor has everything you need to generate this value yourself, but I don't want to put that much effort into it.
 
Reactions: Nikhilniks
Apr 6, 2021
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You are probably seeing conversion losses from ~20V down to 12V, 5V, 3.3V and ~2V->1.25V. That would account for the discrepancy.

Apparently the source code for Open Hardware Monitor has everything you need to generate this value yourself, but I don't want to put that much effort into it.
May be that would be a reason for discrepancy. But for aprox figure Total System Power is the value of total power consumption of my laptop.
 
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powercfg /batteryreport /output "C:\battery-report.html"
you have generated power report. You can also generate energy report. My laptop is shipped with MODERN STANDBY feature. and it is a connected standby. But my battery consumption is too high as compared to what MODERN STANDBY is made for. When i have generated sleepstudy report I have seen Nohwdrips.c10.unknown is running 99% of all the time. Can you tell me what is the reason? How can I also made Nohwdrips.c10.unknown at sleep? I have shared details with microsoft community but they have sent me very old procedure which are not working for now.
 

Colif

Win 10 Master
Moderator
PL1 is idle whereas PL2 is what it can max do under load.

yes, I see conversation moved on. I just thought i simplify difference.

no software monitor is perfect way to get accurate power measurements. hardware more accurate. I noticed that looking for a way to figure out your question.

Nohwdrips.c10.unknow
one fix is to run the power troubleshooter
settings/update & security/troubleshoot/additional troubelshooters/Power (it is in bottom section)
Method 2: Reset Power Plan.

Step 1: Click on the Start Menu and search for Command Prompt.
Step 2: Right Click on the Command Prompt and click on Run As Administrator.
Step 3: Now, type the following command and hit Enter.
  • powercfg –restoredefaultschemes
Step 4: Once you have entered the above command, exit from Command Prompt > Restart the PC once for the changes to take effect and check for the issue.
https://answers.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/forum/all/system-power-report-excessive-battery-drain-caused/5bcfef49-ea7b-4f47-bfe0-1f87e9642f45?auth=1

https://www.dell.com/support/contents/en-au/article/product-support/self-support-knowledgebase/battery-and-power/Battery
 
Reactions: Nikhilniks
Apr 6, 2021
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PL1 is idle whereas PL2 is what it can max do under load.

yes, I see conversation moved on. I just thought i simplify difference.

no software monitor is perfect way to get accurate power measurements. hardware more accurate. I noticed that looking for a way to figure out your question.


one fix is to run the power troubleshooter
settings/update & security/troubleshoot/additional troubelshooters/Power (it is in bottom section)
Method 2: Reset Power Plan.

Step 1: Click on the Start Menu and search for Command Prompt.
Step 2: Right Click on the Command Prompt and click on Run As Administrator.
Step 3: Now, type the following command and hit Enter.
  • powercfg –restoredefaultschemes
Step 4: Once you have entered the above command, exit from Command Prompt > Restart the PC once for the changes to take effect and check for the issue.
https://answers.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/forum/all/system-power-report-excessive-battery-drain-caused/5bcfef49-ea7b-4f47-bfe0-1f87e9642f45?auth=1

https://www.dell.com/support/contents/en-au/article/product-support/self-support-knowledgebase/battery-and-power/Battery
I will comment on PL1 and PL2 after reading full post you have shared.
(And this is bcoz i really wanted to know why some laptop having same processor produces less heat than other laptop which produces more heat having same processor)
For now regarding troubleshooting nowhwdrips.c10.unknown
I have tried most of the methods. What you have sent that too:
These are steps what i have tried:
  1. Reset Power plan
  2. Turned of fast startup
  3. installed recovery image
  4. Installed a fresh copy of windows 10 from Microsoft website
  5. Always disconnect devices and turned on airplane mode
  6. And many more
These steps wont worked. Have you any other??????????
There is only one culprit i.e Nohwdrips.c10.unknown is always running and using most of the battery
 
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Colif

Win 10 Master
Moderator
No Hardware drips = No Hardware Deepest Runtime idle platform state


Powering down the SoC
When all the individual host controllers, CPUs, and GPUs on the SoC have been powered down, Windows will determine if it is safe to power down the entire SoC itself. The SoC vendor provides a power engine plug-in (PEP) to tell Windows when all of the state on the SoC has been saved so that the SoC is ready to enter a low-power mode. For Intel based SoCs, the PEP is provided inbox.

Each SoC vendor has a different implementation of a SoC-wide low-power state. These states are typically either clock-gated or power-gated states in which memory contents are preserved in self-refresh and the system can be awakened by a programmable timer and a small number of GPIO pins that consume very little power. Windows refers to the lowest SoC power state as deepest runtime idle platform state (DRIPS).

The DRIPS state always has the following characteristics:

  • DRIPS is the lowest power consumption state for the SoC in which memory is preserved in a self-refresh mode.
  • DRIPS allows the SoC to wake on events from networking, radio, and input devices.
  • No CPU code is allowed to run during the DRIPS state.
  • When the SoC is in the DRIPS state, the platform is consuming the least amount of power possible during sleep (with the exception of variances in power consumption caused by networking and radio devices).
https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/windows-hardware/design/device-experiences/prepare-hardware-for-modern-standby
I think its intentional for that process to be highest user in sleep.

fun thread, already learned tdp doesn't mean much in cpu that are constantly boosting, it only counts for idle loads. that is only half the story.
 
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Colif

Win 10 Master
Moderator
what are you trying to achieve anyway?

Try updating Intel Management Engine Interface, it might help if you getting battery drain while sleeping

does it mention that process only once in sleep report? I found results where its more than once, just curious.
 
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Apr 6, 2021
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what are you trying to achieve anyway?

Try updating Intel Management Engine Interface, it might help if you getting battery drain while sleeping

does it mention that process only once in sleep report? I found results where its more than once, just curious.
I want to decrease the battery consumption in modern standby. My battery consumption is too high in sleep.
Power Consumption
 

Colif

Win 10 Master
Moderator
what is down below those totals?

I ask as there can be more than 1 process active 97% of time, see link

so if i can get a list of the processes, I can dig into what they all are. It won't be today as its late and I am getting tired.
 
Apr 6, 2021
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fun thread, already learned tdp doesn't mean much in cpu that are constantly boosting, it only counts for idle temps. that is only half the story.
In my opinion TDP is at base clock. When processor is using its clock upto its base clock (ex 1135g7 base@2.4Ghz TDP@28watt and if a task is using speed only upto 2.4Ghz) then the heat will be equal to its TDP (i.e 28watt). In case CPU is at idle and temps are at idle, in that condation frequency will be lower than 2.4Ghz and hence TDP will be much lower (i.e much lower than 28watt).
 

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