[SOLVED] What mean VRM 8+8 phases parallel power design on GigaByte ?

Dec 6, 2021
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I saw Z690 UD DDR4 Gigabyte using VRM 16*+1+2

with sign * mean 8+8 phases parallel power design according to the information on the website .

then the question is what is the difference between parallel power design vs non parallel power design ?

because other brand motherboard only showing 16+1+2 phase without sign * like gigabyte motherboard.
 
I saw Z690 UD DDR4 Gigabyte using VRM 16*+1+2

with sign * mean 8+8 phases parallel power design according to the information on the website .

then the question is what is the difference between parallel power design vs non parallel power design ?

because other brand motherboard only showing 16+1+2 phase without sign * like gigabyte motherboard.
First thing to realize is that is marketing terminology so it could mean almost anything. That's why going to check for a good review of the board (like Buildzoid does) is the best way to know what it's really like in use.

But an "8+8" phase VRM USUALLY means it's 8 true phases with 2 current paths (2 hi-side/2 lo-side FET's, 2 inductors) for each phase. So the VRM has the power handling capability of a 16 phase VRM but with the voltage stability of an 8 phase VRM.

That means trying to hold an extremely low voltage to keep temperature down at an extreme overclock may be difficult (compared to 16 true phases) under heavy loads, e.g., Prime95, since voltage stability won't be so great. But it won't likely burn up either.

Many modern CPU's don't really mind that much when set up properly since they operate differently for energy efficiency. I know Ryzen CPU's are that way...don't know about Intel's latest.
 
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I saw Z690 UD DDR4 Gigabyte using VRM 16*+1+2

with sign * mean 8+8 phases parallel power design according to the information on the website .

then the question is what is the difference between parallel power design vs non parallel power design ?

because other brand motherboard only showing 16+1+2 phase without sign * like gigabyte motherboard.
First thing to realize is that is marketing terminology so it could mean almost anything. That's why going to check for a good review of the board (like Buildzoid does) is the best way to know what it's really like in use.

But an "8+8" phase VRM USUALLY means it's 8 true phases with 2 current paths (2 hi-side/2 lo-side FET's, 2 inductors) for each phase. So the VRM has the power handling capability of a 16 phase VRM but with the voltage stability of an 8 phase VRM.

That means trying to hold an extremely low voltage to keep temperature down at an extreme overclock may be difficult (compared to 16 true phases) under heavy loads, e.g., Prime95, since voltage stability won't be so great. But it won't likely burn up either.

Many modern CPU's don't really mind that much when set up properly since they operate differently for energy efficiency. I know Ryzen CPU's are that way...don't know about Intel's latest.
 
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