Question What memory would be best for i7-6800k?

TweakTweakerson

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Apr 28, 2014
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CPU: i7-6800k
Mobo: ASUS x99 Deluxe II
GPU: EVGA GTX 1080

Old Ram: 32GB G. Skill Ripjaws V DDR4 3200MHz

So my question is as follows:

What is the best ram for my setup. I recently had 3 sticks of this ram die and when contacting the motherboard manufacture they said that the ram is not supported on my motherboard. I had a friend who worked with me at the time help me build and overclock the pc. Everything was stable and then 2 years later my ram took a dump. My friend who helped me IS very knowledgeable when it comes to overclocking computers but I don't know much about overclocking so I am coming here to find out what I should buy to replace this. He is no longer around to help me out. Asus said that this ram isn't compatible. I'm afraid if I just RMA my ram and continue using it that the same thing will happen. I talked to Intel as well and they said the memory should be between 2133 and 2400. Should I just be safe and get 2400 or would I be better getting a higher speed?
 

Karadjgne

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8 x DIMM, Max. 128GB, DDR4 3333(O.C.)/3300(O.C.)/3200(O.C.)/3000(O.C.)/2800(O.C.)/2666(O.C.)/2400(O.C.)/2133 MHz Non-ECC, Un-buffered Memory

If you go to asus support, look for the QVL, there's all kinds of g-skill 3200MHz or faster that's rated as supported. Whom ever at Asus told you the ram wasn't supported was full of ****. The QVL is qualified Vendor list, not qualified Ram list. Asus is not about to test every single model number of every single vendor, there's (I believe) over 4000 individual model numbers just in the Gskill Trident-Z series. Wanna go for everything just Gskill alone puts out?

Simply put, your ram is supported. As far as compatible? It's ddr4 and the asus x99-deluxe ii supports both single and dual rank DIMMs. It's compatible every which way til Sunday, and then some.

Of course Intel will say 2133 or 2400. That's the speeds Intel has officially certified in their cpus. They literally can't tell you any different or go against company policy.

RMA the ram through gskill. If it happens again, rma the mobo and the ram.
 
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TweakTweakerson

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Apr 28, 2014
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8 x DIMM, Max. 128GB, DDR4 3333(O.C.)/3300(O.C.)/3200(O.C.)/3000(O.C.)/2800(O.C.)/2666(O.C.)/2400(O.C.)/2133 MHz Non-ECC, Un-buffered Memory

If you go to asus support, look for the QVL, there's all kinds of g-skill 3200MHz or faster that's rated as supported. Whom ever at Asus told you the ram wasn't supported was full of ****. The QVL is qualified Vendor list, not qualified Ram list. Asus is not about to test every single model number of every single vendor, there's (I believe) over 4000 individual model numbers just in the Gskill Trident-Z series. Wanna go for everything just Gskill alone puts out?

Simply put, your ram is supported. As far as compatible? It's ddr4 and the asus x99-deluxe ii supports both single and dual rank DIMMs. It's compatible every which way til Sunday, and then some.

Of course Intel will say 2133 or 2400. That's the speeds Intel has officially certified in their cpus. They literally can't tell you any different or go against company policy.

RMA the ram through gskill. If it happens again, rma the mobo and the ram.

Thanks for your reply! I was thinking the same as you wrote but I started doubting myself. I will say that the last three letters of the part number for my ram are nowhere on that list however the rest of the part number was, so I was super confused. When I get the RMA's do I need to overclock my computer again to be able to run it. Asus had me dump the OC'ing and test every slot with the working ram stick so I no longer have an OC profile my friend set up. I was told not to use their Oc'ing program b/c it's not dependable. Also, should I just run the ram like it is and not use the XMP profile, as that might have caused the issue to begin with?

For reference the P/n of the ram is as follows: F4-3200C14Q-32GVK

(edited to add information)
 

Karadjgne

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Herald
Xmp is eXtreme Memory Profile. While Intel might have only certified 2133/2400, they aren't against the use of faster ram. That's upto the mobo vendor to say what speeds are supported, according to the chipset used. The x99 supports all of the above. The (OC) can and typically does mean 2 things. First, since the default speeds according to the jedec tables are set by the cpu (2133/2400/2666) if you have that speed ram, that's plug and play. No user intervention required. Faster ram, (OC), requires user intervention. You literally have to change bios settings to a higher level than factory default, which is overclocking. (OC)

Secondly, to support the faster speeds and higher demands that result, it's often necessary to overclock the cpu, just to give the memory controller more ability, allow for higher current settings, lower temps (faster ram = harder working cpu = higher temps) etc.

So (OC) can mean either or both of those or neither realistically, just push the XMP switch and call it a day.

Ram vendors who stick a 3200MHz sticker on the heatsink, use 3200 as part of the model number pretty much guarantee that the ram will run at that speed, either with an xmp profile or manually set values. Asus had you check 1 stick to determine whether or not the actual slot was an issue, or if possibly it's a cpu issue. If one stick works in all 8 slots, and none of the other 3 sticks work in any slot, the 3 ram sticks are bad. I've never seen 3x ram sticks go bad when they are either set in quad channel setup or 2x dual channel setup. 1 failure ok, happens. 2x failures on same channel is not unknown, but 3? That's odd. Which leaves 3x sticks with probably sequential serial numbers from the same batch, having multiple failures. Rma all 4 as a kit. Chances of a different batch having the same issue is exponentially slim, G.Skill has a lifetime warranty for a reason, they aren't afraid of their ram going bunk for the life of its use.

Omg. They told the truth. Software OC, like what's used in Turbo OC and Asus Suite, is garbage. It's a one size fits all overclock that changes the BCLK as well as the multiplier and various other settings you don't have a clue about. It's a sales gimmick, nothing more. How they can apply a non-thinking program to change cpu settings in your cpu or an i5 6600k the same way and get reliable, stable results after a 3 minute evaluation is beyond me. I'll say it again, garbage. They were right. 100%. If you are going to OC, it should be done manually, by you, through bios. Where you can change settings as needed for personal tastes, needs, cooling abilities, stability etc.

Asus had you dump the OC because OC is unpredictable, variable. Factory settings are guaranteed stable and reliable. Anyone will tell you if you have hardware issues, dump the OC first, factory settings give a solid place to start with.

If you had saved the OC in bios as a user profile (you have 10 possible profiles I think) then reset to factory defaults wouldn't erase anything. It'd be factory reset until you decide that the bios should use profile #2 or #3 or #10 at boot. Basically like making a bookmark, only you say whether the browser opens at Microsoft.com, your bookmark, blank page, some other website etc.
 
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