Question What motherboard should I get to go with an AMD Ryzen 9 5900x and running Windows 11

The_Outlander

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Jan 12, 2013
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I've been doing research on what motherboard to get, but it seems that the more I learn the less certain I become.

My tentative build so far is:

cpu:
AMD Ryzen 9 5900X 3.7 GHz 12-Core Processor

memory:
Corsair Vengeance LPX 32 GB (2 x 16 GB) DDR4-3600 CL18 Memory

video card: some variant of the RX 6700 XT I haven't really nailed it down yet.

case:
Corsair 4000D Airflow ATX Mid Tower Case

power supply:
Corsair RM850x (2021) 850 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply

ssd:
Samsung 980 Pro 2 TB M.2-2280 PCIe 4.0 X4 NVME Solid State Drive


As for the motherboard, I was at first leaning towards the ASUS TUF B550-PLUS, but then as I did research I started to wonder whether the VRM is adequate for a 5900X and thought maybe I should pay a bit more for the GIGABYTE B550 AORUS PRO AC instead, but I don't want to spend extra money if I don't have to.

I want my build to be solid and long lived, I don't want too much trouble with updating the BIOS and I don't want any TPM issues with Windows. Should I buy the ASUS TUF or the GIGABYTE or another board entirely?
 
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Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
So, what is your budget?


Obviously everybody always wants the best board out there while paying for an entry level product, but that is just as obviously not realistic. So, what IS realistic is finding the best board option that has the most features, the best VRM configuration and the highest probable long term quality, within the fiscal envelope you are willing to realistically work within.


So, what is the most money you are willing to spend on a motherboard and still feel like you didn't spend more than you could realistically afford to spend.
 
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The_Outlander

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So, what is your budget?


Obviously everybody always wants the best board out there while paying for an entry level product, but that is just as obviously not realistic. So, what IS realistic is finding the best board option that has the most features, the best VRM configuration and the highest probable long term quality, within the fiscal envelope you are willing to realistically work within.


So, what is the most money you are willing to spend on a motherboard and still feel like you didn't spend more than you could realistically afford to spend.
$1500-$1700 is what I'm shooting for overall. I don't want to spend much more than $200 on a motherboard.
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
These are some of the best AM4 boards under 200 dollars. Dr. Mos 50A 14+2 VRM configuration. 2.5GB LAN. AX wireless. ALC1220 audio codec.


PCPartPicker Part List

Motherboard: ASRock B550 Taichi Razer Edition ATX AM4 Motherboard ($199.99 @ Newegg)
Total: $199.99
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2022-11-25 23:00 EST-0500



However, if you want to save a few bucks the ASUS B550-F Gaming is a good choice too. It only has a 12+2 VRM configuration, also using Dr. Mos 50A, but unlike the Taichi and Taichi Razor edition, none of which are "True phase", the B550-F uses a Triple-output VRM which based on a recent deep-dive by Der8aer is a better option than using a doubler, like the Taichi boards (And MANY other boards across all product stacks) do. True phase is the best, but those boards are significantly more expensive. Aside from true phase you want triple or double output phase type more than those using a doubler because the use of a doubler introduces some signal delay AND cuts the PWM frequency in half.

This might somewhat undermine the benefit of having a 14+2 VRM that uses doublers as compared to a 12+2 that uses twin-output or triple-output.

Another very good option, and one that I have on my test bench right now, is the Gigabyte X570S AORUS ELITE AX. It uses twin-output and has an even better 12+2 than the B550-F due to it's 60A stages.

PCPartPicker Part List

Motherboard: Gigabyte X570S AORUS ELITE AX ATX AM4 Motherboard ($189.99 @ Newegg)
Total: $189.99
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2022-11-25 23:25 EST-0500


Any of these three would be good choices and I don't think you can find a better AM4 B550 or X570 board than one of these for less than 200 bucks, new.
 
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.... Should I buy the ASUS TUF or the GIGABYTE or another board entirely?
I'm not sure why you think the TUF B550 gaming plus wouldn't be adequate. It's got a paralleled 8 phase VRM (4 true phases with two complete current paths for each phase) constructed with 8 x 50A DrMOS power stages for 400A current handling capability. They are also covered with a massive heatsink to keep the power stages cool during heavy use.

I have the mATX version of the board and it comfortably handles my PBO'd 5800x in any all-core workload. By comfortable I mean the VRM is barely heating up with maximum temps 40-45C (measured with an IR thermometer) during long handbrake video encodes. I'd have no qualms running a 5950x on it even if temperature during a long encoding should get to 100C plus but I seriously doubt it would come close to it.

I agree to avoid Gigabyte, but if you're hard over for more VRM then an Asus ROG B550 Strix - F would be good, or MSI B550 Tomahawk. They are examples of VRM design overkill: you could operate them with their heatsinks removed even with a PBO'd 5950X.
 
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Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
Stay away from Gigabyte. They make good hardware, but their BIOS is buggy. ASUS generally has the best BIOSes but they are a bad value for the prices they charge.
I agree to avoid Gigabyte
This is BS. I have five recent Gigabyte boards in use (And several others on the test bench dating back to AM3+ and Z170 days that all work fine still as well) just in my home and shop and I have no problems with the BIOS in any of them. At all.

I also have several Gigabyte boards from recent and current Intel and AMD generations in use on client machines for at least five customers, and have no problems on any of those machines either.

ALL, ALL motherboard manufacturers these days (And by "these days" I mean for like the last ten years) tend to have issues with their early BIOS revisions which is why updating the BIOS on any board that is less than ten years old should be treated practically like a driver update and be kept up to date when new versions are released. Often, and this goes for everybody, a lot of new hardware won't even work regardless of the fact that, for example, the board is only a year old and you put a graphics card in it that was just released, without first updating the BIOS.

So making blanket statements like their BIOS are buggy, at best shows you have little knowledge of the subject, and at worst is plainly irresponsible. Factually, it has no merit whatsoever.

And as far as ASUS having the better "anything", that's laughable, especially when it comes to customer support. They used to be far and away the best motherboard manufacturer but that ship sailed five or six years ago.
 

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